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Resources > News > Archived News & Resources from the e-Newsletter - February 2017

Archived News & Resources from the e-Newsletter - February 2017

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News

ON: Advocates push for licensing of home daycares
Source: Toronto Star, February 25, 2017

Excerpt: "In licensed child care settings, Ontario’s Early Years and Child Care Act prescribes everything from staff training and physical safety to nutrition and program goals. But there are licensed spots for barely 20 per cent of children under age 4 in the province. And in cities like Toronto, the average monthly cost is about $1,400 for one child. It means parents who can’t find or afford licensed care are forced to rely on what children’s aid workers call the “grey area” of unlicensed home daycares."

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ON: New rules threaten already-stressed Toronto daycare options
Source: The Globe and Mail, February 24, 2017

Excerpt: "The provincial government is expanding the duty of school boards to provide before- and after-school programs for students from kindergarten to Grade 6 where there is sufficient demand – a politically astute move for Premier Kathleen Wynne, who is facing an election next year. But the changes come with a strict deadline and no financial supports."

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ON: Living wage for Durham region pegged at $17 an hour
Source: Toronto Star, February 23, 2017

Excerpt: "Based on a model developed by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives that includes Statistics Canada data along with local focus groups and polling, the report concludes a family of four would need an annual combined employment income of $67,261 to afford a modest standard of life."

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CA: Standing up for Canada’s kids: We need a children’s commissioner
Source: The Globe and Mail, February 27, 2017

Excerpt: "One of the campaign promises of Justin Trudeau’s Liberals was to create an “Office of the Commissioner for Children and Young Persons in Canada.” They even have legislation written; after all, Marc Garneau (now the Transport Minister) tabled private member’s bills on this issue both in 2009 and 2012 when he was in opposition."

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BC: Parents push back against decision to close two daycares in Vancouver schools
Source: The Globe & Mail, February 23, 2017

Excerpt: "Daycares at two French-language schools in Vancouver have been given notice and may have to close to make room for classroom space, disappointing parents who hoped a court decision last year would resolve long-standing overcrowding concerns."

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AB: Childcare for immigrant children means their parents can attend ESL classes
Source: The Advocate, February 24, 2017

Excerpt: "Although the focus is allowing more parents to attend ESL classes, Elliot sees other positive side-effects: immigrant kids also learning a new language by mixing with English-speaking kids at the daycare. And other non-immigrant kids are getting early exposure to other races and cultures, presumably expanding tolerance."

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NS: Early childhood educators feel ‘devalued’ by Gallant government
Source: Global News, February 24, 2017

Excerpt: "Early childhood educators and directors say they feel “devalued” by the Gallant government after the province failed to provide funding to Early Childhood Care and Education New Brunswick (ECCENB). The association’s grant funding hasn’t been approved for the 2017-2018 fiscal year, resulting in 14 layoffs since January and the announced closure of ECCENB’s office. ECCENB represents industry professionals and provides professional development to educators."

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US: Pre-K is the greatest, most cost-efficient impact on our future workforce that Texas lawmakers can make
Source: The Dallas Morning News, February 27, 2017

Excerpt: "Investing in early learning is in everyone's interest, not only because of the moral imperative to support every child, but also due to the tremendous taxpayer savings in incarceration and social safety net costs if students succeed. Further, early investments have the best chance of equipping people with the ability to earn living wages."

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US: Parents fight for higher wages for childcare workers (video)
Source: CBS News, February 23, 2017

Excerpt: "A group of parents is fighting for higher wages for workers at one of the nation’s largest early childhood education companies. According to government data from 2015, childcare workers make an average of $9.77 an hour. That’s only 68 cents more than the earnings of fast food employees and some others in the food and beverage industry. It is 83 cents less than what retail workers earn."

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US: Ivanka Trump Just Proposed A New Childcare Plan—What Do You Think?
Source: Women’s Health, February 23, 2017

Excerpt: "Specifically, it would allow individuals with an income under $250,000 or couples who earn less than $500,000 to deduct all childcare costs from their income taxes. Lower-income families without tax liability would get an earned income tax credit as an alternative rebate for their childcare expenses, according to Fortune. If enacted, the tax break could cost a whopping $500 billion dollars over the course of the next decade, Bloomberg reports—a tough sell to Congress."

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US: Schools Use Mindfulness to Reform Student Behavior
Source: Huffington Post, February 22, 2017

Excerpt: "Stress can be especially detrimental to children, whose stress-response systems are not fully developed. This makes their brains and bodies more vulnerable to the effects of stress, especially for those in underserved communities who are exposed to violence, abuse, neglect and instability."

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ON: Ontario Investing in Northern First Nation Communities
Source: Government of Ontario, February 21, 2017

Excerpt: "Ontario is investing in infrastructure and economic development in First Nation communities in Northern Ontario, to identify new business opportunities, boost economic growth and provide safe child care spaces."

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ON: 'Seamless transition': Ontario gives $3.6M to create daycare spaces at 5 northern schools
Source: CBC News, February 16, 2017

Excerpt: "The Ministry of Education is giving the Keewatin-Patricia District School Board and the Kenora District Services Board, in northwestern Ontario, $3.6-million to create state of the art child care spaces at five schools."

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BC: Balanced Budget 2017
Source: Government of British Columbia, February 21, 2017

Excerpt: "To increase accessibility of child care, $20 million of that investment in 2017-18 will support the creation of up to 2,000 new, additional, child care spaces. These spaces are in addition to government’s current goal of creating 13,000 new licensed child care spaces between 2014 and 2020, announced as part of the B.C. Early Years Strategy."

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QC: Toward free early childhood education for all?
Source: Montreal Gazette, February 21, 2017

Excerpt: "The commissioners could have just pushed for a reinvestment. Instead they make a strong case for a revolution that starts with the premise: why does society take responsibility for educating children starting at age 5 (or, increasingly, age 4) but, for the most part, leaves the development of babies and toddlers to chance?"

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NT: N.W.T.'s early childhood development action plan gets an update
Source: CBC News, February 21, 2017

Excerpt: "Young children across the N.W.T. are lagging behind the rest of Canada in their development. Outside of Yellowknife, the contrast is even starker. The "Early Development Instrument" developed at McMaster University measured kids across five key areas like emotional maturity, language and cognitive development, and communication skills. In small communities, over 65 per cent of kids were behind in at least one of those areas last year."

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US: America Has Never Not Had a Childcare Problem
Source: Pacific Standard, February 18, 2017

Excerpt: "But America has always had a childcare problem. This is because women have always worked in ways that extend beyond their conventional roles as mothers. The persistent, but harmful, view that childcare is the primary responsibility of the mother has forced American women to develop numerous methods for caring for their children while they work."

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US: One in Six Texas Women Live in Poverty; Report Says Child-Care Changes Could Help
Source: KERA News, February 14, 2017

Excerpt: "Nonprofit leaders say one solution is more family-friendly policies at work — things like paid sick leave and paid family leave, dependent care reimbursement accounts and the option to telecommute. Another concept these researchers are pushing is public/private partnerships. An example would be the city or state working with corporations to subsidize or maybe even provide subsidized child care at work."

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UK: 'It’s time we gave the early years teachers the status, funding and tools they deserve'
Source: TES, February 16, 2017

Excerpt: "Report after report has pointed to the positive long-term impact that high-quality early years provision can have on children, especially when it comes to those from the most disadvantaged backgrounds. The sector is an incredibly complex one with a range of providers, including childminders, PVIs, nurseries and nursery classes in schools. All have a critical role to play, and this diversity allows parents to choose the setting that best fits their child’s needs."

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AU: If you don’t vaccinate your kids, Australia won’t pay for your child care
Source: The Denver Post, February 19, 2017

Excerpt: "Because of the policy, 200,000 more children received their vaccinations, according to Federal Health Minister Greg Hunt. Overall, the percent of fully immunized 5-year-olds rose to 93.2 percent from 92.6 percent. The new statistics also show there are non-vaccination hot spots, such as Adelaide and the Gold Coast hinterland."

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JM: Increased Funding for Early-Childhood Institutions
Source: Jamaica Information Service, February 21, 2017

Excerpt: "There is a 30 per cent increase in the 2017/18 budget for early-childhood institutions (ECIs), and resources are being set aside to help those institutions most urgently in need of assistance."

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ON: Ontario to cap kindergarten classes, give teachers raise in tentative deal
Source: Toronto Star, February 14, 2017

Excerpt: "Ontario’s Liberal government has agreed to cap full-day kindergarten classes at 30, according to a copy of a tentative contract extension agreement with elementary teachers obtained by The Canadian Press. If ratified, elementary teachers will get a 4 per cent raise over two years."

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CA: Many Canadians too cash-strapped to raise children
Source: The Globe and Mail, February 15, 2017

Excerpt: "Daycare costs across the country have risen by 8 per cent since 2014 – more than three times the rate of inflation, according to a study released last year by the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives. In most big cities across the country, it is fairly common to spend $1,000 a month on a licensed daycare spot, says David Macdonald, an economist who conducted the study. That number is even higher in Toronto."

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US: Should the government provide free childcare?
Source: True Jersey, February 15, 2017

Excerpt: "France, Sweden, and Denmark famously subsidize childcare for all their citizens, and there's a growing movement calling for the same in the United States. But childcare is expensive -- it's as costly as college, if you can even find a high-quality facility with room for your child. Opponents point out subsidized childcare requires many Europeans to pay higher taxes, argue it would create more government dependency. Everyone should just take care of their own kids."

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US: Why Every Child (and Mom) Can Benefit from Childcare — and How to Find It
Source: Popsugar, February 15, 2017

Excerpt: "Remember that old adage that raising a child "takes a village," famously used by Hillary Clinton in the title to her 1996 book? Well, it's true. Although we all know the bulk of child-raising responsibility falls on mom's and dad's shoulders, as it should, no couple, and certainly no mother, can do it alone. And moreover, no one should have to. Grandparents, aunts and uncles, friends, and neighbors are all great backup, but finding a good childcare program — even if you're a stay-at-home mom — is important, too."

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US: ‘Good for business’: Investing in child care pays off in the end
Source: WTOP, February 13, 2017

Excerpt: "The U.S. does not have universal paid maternity leave and is the only country among 41 nations that does not offer paid parental leave. And while more companies are implementing flexible work schedules, it isn’t the norm."

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US: What ‘Lucky’ Looks Like for Many Parents: A Patchwork Childcare Arrangement
Source: Pacific Standard, February 13, 2017

Excerpt: "Twelve million children under the age of five rely on childcare each day while their parent(s) work. Two of them are mine. New America’s groundbreaking Care Report illuminated the myriad challenges parents face in securing childcare, among them that demand is too high to meet the staggeringly low supply of high-quality centers. And when high demand meets low supply, as any Econ 101 student can tell you, the price skyrockets."

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US: Combining quality child care with preschool promotes social mobility across generations
Source: The Hill, February 9, 2017

Excerpt: "President Trump campaigned on a plan for making child care more affordable for American families. He also promised to make quality, early childhood education part of his education agenda. The new administration and new Congress would be well-advised to combine the two efforts into one comprehensive package to reduce inequality and promote social mobility across generations. The solution is child care subsidies to incentivize quality early childhood education from birth to age three — combined with greater access to quality preschool at age four."

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US: Is day care impossible?
Source: The Boston Globe, February 8, 2017

Excerpt: "To many new parents, the price tag for child care, a non-negotiable, multi-year expense, comes as a gut-wrenching shock. According to the Care Index, created by the think tank New America and Care.com, US parents pay, on average, nearly $800 per month for full-time, center-based care for children under 5. In Massachusetts, that cost is closer to $1,100 per month, about on par with the median state rent and fully a third of the median household income."

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AU: Baby steps towards a truly modern childcare system
Source: The Sydney Morning Herald, February 12, 2017

Excerpt: "Under the new system, the government will agree to pay only a fixed amount per hour of care, based on a new assessment of the "reasonable cost" of providing care. Based on a survey of actual costs, that amount has been set at $11.55 per hour of care. This should help to limit the crazy price increases."

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ON: Ontario Continuing to Provide Support for Child Care Professionals
Source: Government of Ontario, February 9, 2017

Excerpt: "As part of Ontario's commitment to supporting child care professionals, the program will receive ongoing, annual funding. This year, the province will provide: An ongoing wage enhancement, up to $2 per hour plus benefits, for eligible child care workers and home visitors in the licensed child care sector; An ongoing enhancement, up to $20 per day, for eligible home child care providers; A raise in the maximum hourly wage to be eligible for the wage enhancement - an increase of 1.5 per cent to $26.68 per hour. For home child care providers, the daily fees maximum will be $266.80 per day."

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ON: Kids and parents hold 'play in' protest at city hall over accessible child care
Source: City News, February 7, 2017

Excerpt: "A group of pint-sized protesters took their cry for accessible child care right to the mayor’s office on Tuesday. About a dozen pre-schoolers and their parents held a peaceful (and adorable) “play in” outside John Tory’s office over the noon hour to push for more affordable and accessible child care and recreation services."

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ON: Tory: City will continue to fund child care occupancy grants in 2017
Source: CP24, February 6, 2017

Excerpt: "Mayor John Tory announced Monday that the city intends to reverse a controversial budget proposal that, if approved, would have eliminated an operating grant that subsidizes costs for 350 child-care centres in the city. Speaking at the John A. Leslie Childcare Centre in Scarborough this morning, Tory said the city has now decided it will continue to fund the occupancy grants in 2017. “This $1.13 million investment in 2017 will mean that the parents of more than 8,000 children in Toronto will not see their fees go up on account of any change to those occupancy grants,” Tory said."

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ON: Secrecy and uncertainty surround unlicensed home daycare
Source: Toronto Star, February 5, 2017

Excerpt: "With the abysmal shortage of licensed child care in Toronto — there are licensed spots for barely 28 per cent of kids under age 4 — and costs often topping $2,000 a month, parents like Styles and Moore are scrambling for quality care in a fiercely tight market. They say parents shouldn’t have to rely on unlicensed daycare because they can’t find or afford licensed care."

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CA: Feds' advisers call for higher retirement age and, possibly, national child care
Source: CTV News, February 6, 2017

Excerpt: "The report also proposed boosting the economy by raising labour-force participation for women with children through the possible creation of a subsidized national child-care program similar to the Quebec model."

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CA: $2.6 million in funding awarded to 12 diabetes projects across Canada
Source: Lawson Foundation, February 2, 2017

Excerpt: "The newly funded projects seek to strengthen the delivery of these programs and services by translating knowledge into clinical practice and community programming. They will pilot new community-based interventions, expand existing evidence-based programs, and create tools, resources and training to engage and support children and youth, parents, health professionals, teachers and school staff, community representatives and policy makers. All projects include an evaluation component and a plan for sharing results and learning."

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BC: High daycare costs keeping too many parents out of job market
Source: Vancouver Courier, February 2, 2017

Excerpt: "Child care in B.C. outside Vancouver typically costs between $50 and $100 per day – about $1,000 per month. It is higher in Vancouver – about $1,200 to $1,300 per month, said Emily Mlieczko, executive director of the Early Childhood Educators of BC. A typical annual rate for a toddler in B.C. is $11,100. Subsidized at $10 per day, the average annual rate for daycare for a toddler would be just $2,600."

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BC: Day care troubles? Survey on the way for Tri-City parents
Source: Tri City News, February 2, 2017

Excerpt: "At 68%, the Tri-Cities has the highest labour force participation rate in Metro Vancouver, and the number of daycare spaces has stayed virtually stagnant since 2014, according to the Tri-Cities Child Care Resource and Referral — just a 1.5% increase in capacity, or 97, spaces for a total of 6,604 in the entire region."

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AB: Pregnancy discrimination persists in the workplace, Edmonton researcher says
Source: CBC News, February 3, 2017

Excerpt: "For example, Kapur noted that parental leave in Canada is still being recognized as extended maternity leave, which reinforces the stereotype that women should be the primary caregivers. She also pointed to labour force participation rates in Canada, which tend to be lower for women with young children. That suggests child-care responsibilities still largely fall on women."

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NB: Listening Getting Things and Done - 2017-2018 Budget
Source: Government of New Brunswick, February 7, 2017

Excerpt: "Understanding the importance of early childhood education in the years before kindergarten and the struggle many families face over the cost of daycare, our government will increase the amount it provides to New Brunswickers to help pay for the cost of daycare. By January 1, 2018, in keeping with our platform commitment, we will have doubled the budget of the daycare assistance program."

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NT: Fully funding junior kindergarten? Not this fall, says N.W.T. gov't
Source: CBC News, February 2, 2017

Excerpt: "Regular MLAs are disappointed the N.W.T.'s government promise to fully fund the expansion of junior kindergarten won't apply to the coming 2017-2018 school year. The funding model unveiled on Wednesday, if approved by a majority of MLAs, could still force school boards in the territory to reallocate money from their own budgets to help pay for the expansion."

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US: How to Close a Gender Gap: Let Employees Control Their Schedules
Source: The New York Times, February 7, 2017

Excerpt: "The main reason for the gender gaps at work — why women are paid less, why they’re less likely to reach the top levels of companies, and why they’re more likely to stop working after having children — is employers’ expectation that people spend long hours at their desks, research has shown. It’s especially difficult for women because they have disproportionate responsibility for caregiving."

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US: Think big, start early: New effort to close gender gap in science starts in preschool
Source: CBS News, February 3, 2017

Excerpt: "The stakes for early intervention are high: new research shows that, in the U.S., girls become affected by gender stereotypes about their intellectual abilities by age 6. The study, published this week the journal Science, showed that at age 5, boys and girls were equally likely to choose their own gender as “really, really smart.” But girls age 6 and 7 were significantly less likely than boys to associate high intelligence with their own gender."

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Resources

Low-cost, no-cost materials
Source: Science of Early Child Development, March 1, 2017

Excerpt: "Stones are a classic example of a low-cost or no-cost (found, recycled/reusable) material that is naturally occurring, timeless, and easy to collect. There are many ways to use these types of materials, which makes them particularly valuable as play items. Think of all the possibilities: sorting, counting, piling, pretending!"

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Employment Insurance Special Benefits Consultations - Release of Summary Findings
Source: Government of Canada, February 28, 2017

Excerpt: "Overall, the most common challenges experienced while on maternity or parental leave are regarding financial hardships, restrictions in the qualification criteria for those self-employed or on contract, and difficulties finding childcare. When asked about their challenges while being in maternity or parental leave, the most common challenges mentioned are related to finances, especially among those with single income families, twins, and multiple births; difficulties finding suitable and affordable childcare; and problems qualifying for EI benefits while being self-employed or working on contract."

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Pedagogical Knowledge and the Changing Nature of the Teaching Profession
Source: OECD, February 21, 2017

Excerpt: " This publication presents research and ideas from multiple perspectives on pedagogical knowledge - the knowledge of teaching and learning - and the changing nature of the teaching profession. It provides a modern account of teachers’ professional competence, and how this relates to student learning. The report looks at knowledge dynamics in the teaching profession and investigates how teachers’ knowledge can be measured. It provides precious insights into 21st century demands on teacher knowledge."

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Best Start in Life: Early Childhood Development for Sustainable Development
Source: The SDG Academy, February 17, 2017

Excerpt: "The SDG Academy was launched in September 2016 with the goal of becoming the worlds best curation and creation site for educational content on the SDGs. The SDG Academy is housed at the SDSN Association and is the flagship education initiative of the SDSN. The work of the SDG Academy began as SDSNedu, an online effort that created Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) for selected SDGs."

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Father involvement in the UK: trends in the new millennium
Source: FamiliesAndSocieties, February 2, 2017

Excerpt: "This report examines recent changes in father involvement in the UK by analysing the 2000 and 2015 UK Time-Use surveys and compares the patterns with findings from similar analyses for France, Italy and Sweden. The analyses show that fathers in the UK spent more time doing childcare in 2015 compared to 2000 but they spent less total time together with their children. Compared to fathers in France and Sweden, the levels of father involvement in the UK were relatively low. The UK stands out from the other three countries by stronger educational gradients of father involvement on weekends, suggesting cumulative disadvantages of children who grow up in low-educated families."

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State Early Care and Education Updates 2016
Source: National Women’s Law Center, January 26, 2017

Excerpt: "In 2016, a number of states increased funding for preschool programs, made policy changes to comply with the federal Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act of 2014 (which reauthorized the major federal child care program), or took other steps to expand or improve early care and education opportunities for children and families. Yet few states made the significant new investments necessary to meet the important goals of the CCDBG Act of 2014, which aims to ensure the health and safety of children in child care, improve the quality of care, and make it easier for families to access and retain child care assistance. And several states made cuts that will further limit families’ access to affordable, high-quality early care and education."

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Study: Women in Canada: The girl child
Source: Statistics Canada, February 22, 2017

Excerpt: "There were about 3.4 million girls aged 17 and under in Canada on July 1, 2016, accounting for about one-fifth of Canada's female population. Today, Statistics Canada releases a new chapter, "The Girl Child," from the publication Women in Canada: A Gender-based Statistical Report. This chapter describes the demographic characteristics of girls in Canada, and presents several topics related to their well-being, such as their living arrangements, socioeconomic conditions, health and education."

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To continue to grow
Source: Commission sur l’éducation à la petite enfance, February 21, 2017

Excerpt: "Early childhood (birth to age 4) educational services should be free, just like school. Since early childhood educational services are the first step on the child’s educational path and should be formally integrated into the preschool and school educational continuum, we believe they should be covered by the same broad principles of universal and free access that apply to schooling."

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Engaging Alberta Municipal Level Governments in Support of Early Learning and Care
Source: The Muttart Foundation, December 2016

Excerpt: "Through its review of the role of municipalities in early learning and care, this paper aims both to present information on municipal models in Alberta and other Canadian provinces and to raise questions and generate discussion on the possible roles Alberta municipal level governments might play, and the responsibilities they might take on, to advance early learning and care in Alberta with a focus on the greater public management, planning and delivery of child care services."

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One year of high-quality early education improves outcomes for low-income infants, toddlers
Source: Science Daily, February 8, 2017

Excerpt: "Infants and toddlers from low-income families who attended a high-quality center-based early education program did better in language and social skills after only one year than children who do not attend the program, research shows. The program, included specific components that may contribute to the positive development of children from low-income families."

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A Profile of Poverty in Edmonton: Update 2017
Source: Edmonton Social Planning Council, February 9, 2017

Excerpt: "Viewed through a social policy lens, the new Alberta Child Benefit and the new Canada Child Benefit (which adds to and replaces several poorly‐targeted programs) are child poverty game changers. Starting in July 2016, an Alberta family with two children making $30,000 annually will receive $4,300 more per year from the federal and provincial governments."

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Economic Issues for Women in Texas 2017
Source: Dallas Women's Foundation, February 13, 2017

Excerpt: "Economic Issues for Women in Texas examines the economic status of women as well as the critical building blocks - education, health insurance, child care and housing - necessary for women to achieve economic security. The study looks at policies and practices at the state level, and identifies areas of opportunity where innovation and investment can help women and their families move from surviving to thriving."

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A Safety Net That Works: Improving Federal Programs for Low-Income Americans
Source: American Enterprise Institute, February 8, 2017

Excerpt: "Research also shows that child care costs can be a barrier to employment and that assistance can help mothers work, which is essential for many low-income families and supports broader economic growth. Studies find that child care subsidies reduce out-of-pocket child care costs, and lower costs make employment more attractive. Research finds a range of effects, but most suggest that child care assistance increases maternal employment anywhere from 5 to 21 percent among single mothers, depending on the subsidy’s size."

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What it's like to be a parent in a war zone (video)
Source: TED, February 2016

Description: "How do parents protect their children and help them feel secure again when their homes are ripped apart by war? In this warm-hearted talk, psychologist Aala El-Khani shares her work supporting — and learning from — refugee families affected by the civil war in Syria. She asks: How can we help these loving parents give their kids the warm, secure parenting they most need?"

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Tapping Economic Potential Through Broader Workforce Participation
Source: Government of Canada, Advisory Council on Economic Growth, February 6, 2017

Excerpt: "A different approach could be the creation of a universal subsidized childcare program, which not only ensures that quality of service is measured but also makes it possible to distribute benefits on a progressive scale. If such a model were to be considered on a national level, the Quebec system is an obvious case study. While the system has been lauded for its apparent ability to increase female workforce participation, increased generosity of the Canada Child Benefit could reduce the labour force participation of second earners as household disposable income rises with higher benefits. This is less likely to be a problem among the lowest-income households. Tapping economic potential through broader workforce participation rates, has been criticized for being insufficiently progressive in delivery. If the aim is to remove the financial barriers faced by low-income parents in particular, the progressiveness of a national childcare program will be a crucial element."

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Street Play in Canada: street hockey, snow and sidewalks
Source: Playing Out, February 6, 2017

Excerpt: "Our StreetPLAY Pilot Project will see us working with the city’s permitting office, local councilors, residents’ associations and play co-ops throughout this year to establish a local permitting process for regularly scheduled street closures (full or partial). We’ll also be conducting a study with Toronto’s Ryerson University into the benefits and effectiveness of street play."

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AECEO Submission to Ministry of Education, Early Years Division’s Consultation on Early Years and Child Care Strategy
Source: AECEO, February 3, 2017

Excerpt: "Anchoring early years and child care programs in schools gives families consistent support for children birth to 3 in their community. The pedagogical continuity that we hope to see in the renewed approach to integrated early years and child care programs requires qualified early childhood educators to be part of every program. The professional benefits of seamless programs for children is, also, that EC professionals have the opportunity to engage with one another – and to really bring to life the theory and principles of Ontario’s Pedagogy for the Early Years, through their daily professional collaboration and dialogue which ultimately benefits children and families."

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Early Years and Child Care: Good for Equality, Good for the Economy – Unifor Submission to the Ontario Consultation on an Early Years and Child Care Strategy
Source: Unifor, February 3, 2017

Excerpt: "Investing in child care also has significant socio-economic benefits to society. Economists estimate that there is a seven dollar return for every dollar spent on early childhood education. This includes the creation of jobs, expanding the provincial tax base and boosting our local economies. Living wages for child care providers are spent in the community and help support a stable workforce. Access to programs also helps close the gender wage gap, where women are paid $0.735 for every $1 that men are paid."

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ZERO TO THREE Infant and Early Childhood Mental Health Policy Convening Report - Aligning Policy and Practice: Mental Health Assessment and Treatment of Infants, Young Children, and Families
Source: Zero to Three, February 3, 2017

Excerpt: "Although secure attachment helps build resilience, Dr. Gunnar cited studies showing that less supportive parenting; chronic early deprivation; and exposure to frequent, stressful experiences have serious conse¬quences for young children’s developing brains and stress systems. To ensure healthy development, science points toward a three-tiered approach: (1) universally available basic health services and early care and education; (2) broadly targeted interventions for children in poverty or with other broad risks (e.g., immigrants); and (3) narrowly targeted, specialized services for 10–15% of children who experience toxic stress levels to prevent the development of later problems."

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A Basic Income for Canadians: What would change?
Source: Metcalf Foundation, January 2017

Excerpt: "Larraine is a 34 year old lone parent mother. Her father lives in BC and her mother passed away two years ago. Larraine lives in an apartment in a Toronto suburb where she has been living for 9 years. She pays $1,400 a month for her two-bedroom suite. (This is 39% of her income; housing advocates say a family should pay no more than 30%.) Her children—Karen, 11, Joey who is 8, and Riley who is 7—go to school in the public system. She pays $6,000 a year to her cousin for child care. She reciprocates with free babysitting for her cousin as often as she can."

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Position Paper: The Role of Play in ECEC
Source: EECERA, January 25, 2017

Excerpt: "This is a position paper prepared by the members of the EECERA Special Interest Group “Rethinking Play”. The position paper focuses on the possible impact of the current international trends regarding the instrumentalisation of ECEC on play. The SIG members argue that, due to this standardised approach to ECEC deriving from a collective strive for high quality and performance amongst countries, the very concept of play defined as a spontaneous, creative, socio-cultural activity and also as children’s right can lose its meaning."

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Where are the Children? Healing the Legacy of the Residential Schools
Source: The Legacy of Hope Foundation

Excerpt: "Between 1831 and 1969, residential schools operated in Canada through arrangements between the Government of Canada and the Roman Catholic, Anglican, Methodist, United and Presbyterian churches. This partnership ended in 1969, with the Government of Canada taking over the management of residential schools and beginning to transfer control to Indian bands. The last federally-run residential school, Gordon Indian Residential School in Punnichy, Saskatchewan, closed in 1996. One common objective defined this period — the assimilation of Aboriginal children."

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