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Resources > News > Archived News & Resources from the e-Newsletter - March 2017

Archived News & Resources from the e-Newsletter - March 2017

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The Atkinson Centre weekly e-Newsletter is issued every Thursday afternoon.
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News

CA: Liberals plan to spend $195M on research into child care in Canada
Source: CTV News, March 29, 2017

Excerpt: "To figure out how, and to learn what is and isn't working when it comes to child care in Canada, the Liberal government will spend $195 million in the coming years on research to close data gaps on child care. The money, coming out of funds promised in this month's budget, could potentially create 40,000 subsidized spaces for low and modest-income families over the next three years, and help more parents enter the workforce."

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CA: Would a universal childcare system in Canada pay for itself?
Source: Global News, March 28, 2017

Excerpt: "Pierre Fortin, of the Université du Québec à Montréal, said his research found that the Quebec program did cover its costs — and then some — once several forms of government revenue and savings are taken into account. According to Fortin’s study, in 2008, the Quebec program cost $1.2 billion and resulted in gross revenue and savings of $2.1 billion for the government."

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CA: Liberal's 18-month parental leave a disservice to women, says critic
Source: The Current, March 27, 2017

Excerpt: "The Liberal government has followed through with a 2015 promise to deliver an 18-month parental leave package — giving families the option of taking an extra six months off. But some critics are asking whether the extended leave option helps or hinders new parents, especially new mothers."

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CA: Another perk for parents from budget 2017: flexible work arrangements
Source: Global News, March 27, 2017

Excerpt: "There is a lot in the latest federal budget for Canadian parents, including more funding for childcare and a proposal to extend parental leave to 18 months. But there’s another, little-noticed measure that those balancing work and family will cheer: Allowing federally-regulated workers to request flexible work arrangements from their employers."

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CA: Budget 2017 needs more for children and families
Source: CUPE, March 27, 2017

Excerpt: "The $500 million for child care announced in Budget 2016 for 2017-2018 only increases 10 per cent to $550 million by 2021-2022. More significant increases will only be seen as of 2022-2023, well after the next federal election."

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CA: The new Liberal budget will send money for ‘children’ right to the wealthy and the bureaucrats
Source: National Post, March 27, 2017

Excerpt: "Currently only about 15 per cent of Canadian children 0-5 are in daycare centres. Statistics Canada reports that higher-income families are more likely to use this arrangement. Taxpayers are funding higher-income families with huge subsidies for institutional child care at the expense of lower income families — including single parents — who prioritize parental child care."

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BC: B.C.'s working poor: Affordable child care key to lifting families out of poverty
Source: Vancouver Sun, March 27, 2017

Excerpt: "According to the coalition of child care providers pushing for the $10-a-day plan, Canada ranks last among developed countries for child care spending, and B.C. is worse than the Canadian average for high fees, few regulated spaces, and low government funding. As a result, many mothers don’t work, or choose to work only part-time."

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MB: Feds and Assembly of Manitoba Chiefs Work toward Child Care Solution
Source: NetNewsLedger, March 28, 2017

Excerpt: "This federal government has committed to listening and ensuring indigenous families are involved in the necessary transformation of how our children are protected in our communities. Despite political pressures, putting more money into the Manitoba Child & the Family Service (CFS) industry is not a viable option because the system is financially incentivized to apprehend children and keep them maintained away from their family."

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MB: Unclear how federal child care promises will translate to Manitoba: province
Source: CTV News, March 23, 2017

Excerpt: "The Manitoba Child Care Association said the promise is just a drop in the bucket compared to the growing need for licensed child care spaces in the province. "We have close to 15,000 names on our online child care registry, so the demand for child care right across the country is through the roof,” said Pat Wege, the association’s executive director."

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QC: Budget 2017-2018: The Québec Economic Plan
Source: Government of Quebec, March 28, 2017

Excerpt: "In order to enhance support for Québec families, the Québec Economic Plan provides for an additional investment of close to $130 million over six years for family services. $20 million will be allocated to the Ministère de la Famille for 2016-2017 to provide community-based financial assistance, including $10 million, which will be drawn from available budget funds over the year. Funding of $7.4 million will also be granted to the Ministère de la Famille for 2016-2017.  These sums will be drawn directly from availabilities during the year. Further more, additional appropriations of $20 million per year for the period from 2017-2018 to 2021-2022 will be granted to the Ministère de la Famille."

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NL: Speech from the Throne - The Way Forward to Greater Prosperity
Source: Government of Newfoundland and Labrador, March 28, 2017

Excerpt: "Indicative of our Government's commitment to early learning and child care, we will increase child care subsidies available to low income families throughout the province by increasing the income threshold eligibility requirement. Our Government will also look to increase the Early Learning and Child Care Supplement for qualifying early childhood educators."

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PE: Changes proposed for P.E.I. child care registry
Source: CBC News, March 27, 2017

Excerpt: "The Early Childhood Development Association says it's working on a funding proposal for the provincial government for money to make the registry more user-friendly, and to help pay for more training opportunities for daycare directors on how to navigate the online tool."

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PE: P.E.I. daycare owner hoping billions from Ottawa funds more infant spaces
Source: CBC News, March 23, 2017

Excerpt: "But in an e-mail to CBC, a spokesperson for P.E.I.'s early learning department said access to child care spaces for infants is an issue that needs addressing. "PEI does well in terms of access to child care for 2-5 year olds. But infant care is a challenge here like most other places," the e-mail said."

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DE: Germany Is Taking Away Kindergarteners' Toys to Curb Future Addiction
Source: The Atlantic, March 28, 2017

Excerpt: "The rules of the toy-free kindergarten are simple: For a period of three months, all the toys are removed, leaving only furniture and things like blankets and pillows. The teachers meet with the children and the parents before the toy-free time starts so they know what to expect, but once the project begins the teachers observe, rather than direct, the children’s play. They let the children learn how to deal with their own boredom and frustration."

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Budget 2017 – Building a Strong Middle Class
Source: Government of Canada, March 22, 2017

Excerpts: "To ensure that Canadian families have better access to high-quality, affordable child care, the Government is working with the provinces and territories to develop a National Framework on Early Learning and Child Care, focusing on best practices and new approaches to best serve families."

"In addition, a distinct Indigenous Framework on Early Learning and Child Care, will be created in cooperation with Indigenous partners. The distinct Indigenous framework will reflect the unique cultures and needs of First Nations, Inuit and Métis children across Canada."

Also see:

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CA: Should Canada extend its maternity leave to 18 months?
Source: Global News, March 19,2017

Excerpt: "Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has been toying with the idea of extending parental leave and benefits from the current 12 to 18 months. The Liberals’ proposal would stretch the current overall amount of benefits over a longer period of time, resulting in smaller paycheques for moms and dads taking time off work."

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AB: Budget 2017
Source: Government of Alberta, March 16, 2017

Excerpt: "The expense budget for Children’s Services is $1 .4 billion in 2017 -18. The ministry was established to create an increased focus on ensuring that children in Alberta are provided with the services and supports they need to thrive in healthy families and healthy communities. Budget 2017 provides stable funding for the child intervention system, early intervention services, child care and the Alberta Child Benefit."

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SK: Meeting the Challenge - Provincial Budget 2017-2018
Source: Government of Saskatchewan, March 21, 2017

Excerpt: "The current capital plan provides $2.1 million for the planning of two new major school capital projects in Weyburn and Rosthern and continues to support four ongoing major capital projects in addition to the joint-use bundles of nine schools in Regina, Saskatoon, Warman and Martensville. These joint-use schools will be ready for students for the 2017 school year and will add much needed capacity – up to 11,100 students and 810 child care spaces – to these communities."

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SK: Daycare spaces still a struggle in Regina
Source: Global News, March 16, 2017

Excerpt: "They’re having to call family members or find friends that have day homes to put their children there until they can get into a licensed centre."

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NU: Nunavut MLA says lack of daycare hurts high school attendance
Source: Nunatsiaq Online, March 17, 2017

Excerpt: "The MLA said the lack of daycare spaces is what’s actually preventing young parents, who would normally attend Grade 10 to Grade 12, from going to school, which pulls down high school attendance figures. “Some high school students are young parents, and right now we only have one daycare in the community, and that’s always booked solid for GN employees, or whoever was on top of the priority list.”"

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YT: Yukon’s lack of foster parents means preschoolers are staying in group homes
Source: Yukon News, March 15, 2017

Excerpt: "Kids as young as three are staying in the territory’s group homes, sometimes living with older children, the News has learned. Group homes normally don’t house children younger than eight. But the health department now admits children as young as three are staying in group care."

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US: Julia, A Muppet with Autism, Joins The Cast Of 'Sesame Street'
Source: NPR, March 20, 2017

Excerpt: "For the first time in a decade, the classic children's television show Sesame Street will introduce a new Muppet on the air. Her name is Julia. She's a shy and winsome 4-year-old, with striking red hair and green eyes. Julia likes to paint and pick flowers. When Julia speaks, she often echoes what she's just heard her friends Abby and Elmo say. Julia has autism."

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US: Jennifer Garner urges Congress to fund early-childhood education: ‘A brain in poverty is up against it. I’m telling you.’
Source: The Washington Post, March 16, 2017

Excerpt: "When many of these children enter kindergarten, they don’t know their letters or numbers. They don’t know how to sit in a circle and listen to a story. They don’t know how to hold a book — they may have never even seen a book! That’s shocking, isn’t it? That 1 in 5 children in this country live in the kind of poverty that they could enter kindergarten never having seen a book."

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US: Feminists Need to Focus on Child Care
Source: The Indypendent, March 15, 2017

Excerpt: "A major issue that must be part of this agenda is child care, which should be understood as both a necessary social investment and an issue of labor rights for the many women working as child care providers. It has only been through the availability of child care many women have been able to stay in the paid labor force."

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US: What educators know about teaching young children — but policymakers ignore
Source: The Washington Post, March 15, 2017

Excerpt: "A recent survey of more than 1,000 of the nation’s educators of young children found that 80 percent of the respondents said that early childhood educators had not been included in the decision-making processes and policies that affect their work. This explains why in recent years policies affecting early childhood education have become disconnected from what is known about young children and how they learn."

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US: How should our kids play at recess? Alameda schools offer lessons
Source: San Francisco Chronicle, March 12, 2017

Excerpt: "Research resoundingly supports the idea that kids learn best if they have a chance to let loose. But there are few official standards guiding recess in public schools, and that free time can look starkly different, depending on the decisions of administrators, who have a legal and professional obligation to keep kids safe."

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ON: Upcoming changes to child-care rules create uncertainty for parents
Source: CBC News, March 10, 2017

Excerpt: "The new legislation stipulates that before-and-after-school programs that care for more than five children be licensed as child-care centres. Schools may provide up to three hours of care daily, without a licence, for children ages six and older."

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ON: What Toronto Can Learn About Childcare from Japan
Source: Torontoist, March 8, 2017

Excerpt: "In 2010, Yokohama had the longest waitlist for childcare of any city in Japan. With 1,522 children unable to secure a space at a licensed provider, Fumiko Hayashi, mayor of Japan’s second-largest city, set a target to eliminate the waitlist within three years. The strategy involved identifying new sites for childcare centres, improving communication with parents, and adjusting services to meet the needs of families."

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CA: Child care in Canada expected to get long-term funding in federal budget
Source: Global News, March 15, 2017

Excerpt: "Child care advocates have been told to expect a long-term funding commitment in next week’s budget, sources say, but some are already wondering whether it’s wise of the federal government to promise years of cash without first securing conditions from the provinces."

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CA: What do working German women have that Canadians don’t? Lots of help from above
Source: The Globe and Mail, March 13, 2017

Excerpt: "A lot of younger women in Canada, in their 20s and 30s, are running into limits,” says Frances Woolley, a Carleton University professor who specializes in the economies of families and gender. “We’ve seen a cohort of women grow up in Canada who have not experienced the struggle to get out of the home and into the work force – instead, they’ve experienced the barriers and difficulties of balancing work and family, the difficulty of finding child care, the challenges of running a household while working, the gaps in pay between men and women."

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CA: Child-rearing isn’t just expensive, it’s individual
Source: The Journal, March 10, 2017

Excerpt: "An article in The Toronto Star this week challenged the federal government to undergo detailed research on how much it costs to raise a child in Canada before pledging to end child poverty or helping middle-class families. The value of this research wouldn’t just be in finding out how much it costs to raise a child in Canada — the value is also in pushing politicians to do their homework before making blanket promises."

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BC: Child-care investment should be a priority for British Columbia
Source: The Globe and Mail, March 8, 2017

Excerpt: "For anyone who believes that public infrastructure can produce economic benefits, as the vast majority of Canadians do, child care is a superior investment. It is in your economic interest to support a public system, whether you are young or old, man or woman, with children or without."

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MB: Province Announces New Early Years Education Initiative to Support Student Success in Literacy, Numeracy
Source: Government of Manitoba, March 14, 2017

Excerpt: "The minister confirmed the new Early Years Education Initiative will replace the Smaller Classes Initiative, affording school divisions greater flexibility and autonomy to direct funding in ways that will improve outcomes for students in the early years (kindergarten to Grade 3).  Beginning in the 2017-18 school year, school divisions may decide how to use the associated funding to improve outcomes within their unique student populations – either by covering operating costs in order to maintain the smaller classes, to invest in improvements to teacher capacity and student achievement, or some combination of the two."

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MB: Manitoba to reform child-care system, spend $6.2M to add more space
Source: CBC News, March 9, 2017

Excerpt: "The Manitoba government is investing more than $6 million to create up to 739 new licensed child-care spaces, while also promising to modernize the early-learning system."

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Activists, celebrities and governments call to end global gender pay gap
Source: UN Women, March 13, 2017

Excerpt: "On global average, women only make 77 cents for every dollar men earn. As a result, there’s a lifetime of income inequality between men and women and more women are retiring into poverty. The global gender pay gap is 23 per cent, and in some countries this gap is even bigger: over their lifetimes, women in Sweden and France can expect to earn 31 per cent less than men; this figure is 49 per cent for women in Germany and 75 per cent for women in Turkey. One of the main reasons for the gender pay gap is that women tend to be concentrated in different jobs than men, such as teaching, health care, or child-care, and these sectors are the ones that tend to be underpaid."

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US: To bridge achievement gap, Delaware needs more after-school programs
Source: Newsworks, Mach 8, 2017

Excerpt: "Delaware is sorely deficient in affordable after-school and summer learning programs, a problem that disproportionally affects the scholastic performance of children from low-income families."

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US: Better Compensation: A Necessary Component for a Strong Head Start Workforce
Source: New America, March 7, 2017

Excerpt: "Talk to child care center directors around the country and you will often hear a story that goes something like this: The center had a fabulous teacher who was passionate about working with young children and had a natural connection with them. The center director supported this teacher as she earned her bachelor’s degree, taking classes at night after long days with the children and studying on weekends. The director hoped that the teacher was gaining new knowledge and skills to make her even more effective in the classroom. But soon after earning her degree, the teacher, who now had greater access to higher paying job prospects, left to work in the local public school system."

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NZ: The changing preferences of parents and why leaders of the largest ECE groups are making the same decision
Source: LinkedIn, March 13, 2017

Excerpt: "Regional differences in funding and legislation provide different challenges - 20 hours free ECE for children in New Zealand vs no free child care in many places in North America, reporting criteria to regulators, and new teacher registration requirements in some States in Australia to name a few."

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ON: Solving Ontario’s child care crisis
Source: Toronto Star, March 8, 2017

Excerpt: "Affordable fees for parents. We should replace individual fee subsidies with a more modern approach. Ontario should fund child care programs directly and set a sliding fee scale that makes child care affordable for every family."

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ON: Kids with late birthdays can wait a year for kindergarten if needed, Toronto school board says
Source: The Globe and Mail, March 7, 2017

Excerpt: "Holding children back another year can be agonizing for parents, and has financial implications as families are forced to look for alternative care. In Toronto, an extra year of daycare could cost about $1,100 a month. Late-birthday children in Ontario are as young as three when they start full-day kindergarten, and may not be fully toilet trained or have the capacity to communicate clearly."

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ON: K-W MPP's bill to fund not-for-profit child care fails to pass second reading
Source: CBC News, March 3, 2017

Excerpt: "A bill to have the province fund exclusively not-for-profit child care spaces proposed by Kitchener-Waterloo MPP Catherine Fife has been quashed at Queen's Park."

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CA: The real cost of raising children
Source: Political Options, March 7, 2017

Excerpt: "Accurate estimates of the cost of raising children are relevant for other public policy purposes too. Federal, provincial and territorial governments are currently developing a national child care policy framework with common principles such as affordability, so a realistic overall cost assessment is fundamental to determining what affordability means. When child and family service agencies place children in foster care, provincial and territorial governments must provide adequate funds to compensate foster parents for the costs of raising these children."

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CA: Who is minding the gap?
Source: The Globe and Mail, March 6, 2017

Excerpt: "Several factors explain the pay differences. One is that women are more likely to work part time than men, in many cases because they take on child-care and elder-care responsibilities. They are also more likely to experience work interruptions in their careers."

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CA: How day camps became summertime day care
Source: MacLean’s, March 6, 2017

Excerpt: "Even day care should be public, Gregory argues. “If the States or Canada said, ‘We’re going to extend public education down to [age] zero or one or two,’ you’d see a baby boom,” she says. Quebec’s universal low-fee day-care program, which began in 1997, has led to more women joining the workforce and encourages them to start bigger families, according to Pierre Fortin, an economics professor at Université de Montreal. “A dollar invested in preschool education,” he says, “has a higher return than an investment in any other year of education.”"

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CA: Taking stock of toddlers’ tall tales
Source: The Globe and Mail, March 1, 2017

Excerpt: "Research out of Dr. Kang Lee’s lab at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education has shown that 30 per cent of two year olds will lie about a transgression. That goes up to half by the age of three, and then 80 per cent or more after the age of four."

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MB: Province Announces New Licensed Community-Based Child-Care Spaces, Releases Plans for Modernization of Early Learning and Child-Care System
Source: Government of Manitoba, March 9, 2017

Excerpt: "The Manitoba government is committing $6,181,500 for 15 community-based capital projects that will create up to 739 new licensed child-care spaces and is launching new measures to increase the efficiency of the licensed early learning and child-care system by addressing regulatory barriers for operators, Families Minister Scott Fielding announced today."

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All children deserve a Head Start
Source: The Hill, March 6, 2017

Excerpt: "Early childhood interventions level the playing field for underprivileged children. And they do so at a bargain price. In the United States, disadvantaged children who participate in Head Start -- the early childhood development program -- enter kindergarten with bigger vocabularies and better foundational skills. That cuts the achievement gap between them and their more fortunate peers by 45 percent. The program also slashes child mortality."

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US: A Day Without Child Care Workers
Source: Huffington Post, March 7, 2017

Excerpt: "Access to high-quality, affordable child care is unarguably one of the most critical policy needs to support gender equity in the workplace. While gender roles are shifting, routine child care duties still fall heavily on mothers, meaning that access to child care can greatly benefits working mothers. Currently, over 8 million mothers rely on their child care providers in order to go to work and provide for their families."

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US: President Trump, an Unlikely Champion of Affordable Child Care
Source: The New York Times, March 2, 2017

Excerpt: "The issue has been something of a political orphan in recent years. Feminist organizers have focused more on equal pay and paid parental leave, while education reformers have rarely emphasized the period between birth and pre-K enrollment — even though those years are crucial for cognitive development. President Barack Obama’s 2015 plan to increase existing child-care tax credits to a maximum of $3,000 a child from $1,050 went nowhere."

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AU: The childcare worker who earns more cleaning the centre than looking after the kids
Source: The Sydney Morning Herald, March 7, 2017

Excerpt: "Smith, who has a degree in early childhood education, earns $26 an hour. She lives with her border collie Boots in a Hobart house that has a $200,000 mortgage and an even bigger need for renovations. After tax, each week, she clears just less than $810. To make ends meet, she cleans the centre for three hours a night. That's her second job. It pays $26.58 an hour."

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Resources

Education Indicators in Canada, biannual
Source: Statistics Canada, March 29, 2017

Excerpt: "These indicators provide useful insights on education in Canada. For example, data show that from 2004/2005 to 2014/2015, the proportion of full-time elementary/secondary teachers under the age of 30 decreased, while the comparable proportion of teachers 60 years of age or older increased. This is in line with what has been observed in Canada more generally, namely that the Canadian population is aging and that the older generation is increasingly postponing retirement. During this same time period, the percentage of male full-time teachers continued to decrease steadily."

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Infographic: Women, Caregiving and Work in Canada
Source: Vanier Institute, March 28, 2017

Excerpt: "Women reported experiencing a variety of employment impacts as a result of their caregiving responsibilities: 30% reported missing at least one full day of work; 6.4% retired early, quit or lost their paid job; and 4.7% turned down a job offer or promotion."

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Kids Who Suffer Hunger in First Years Lag Behind Their Peers in School
Source: NPR, March 23, 2017

Excerpt: "The new study, published in the latest issue of the journal Child Development, suggests that such early experience of hunger in the family is likely to make those children less ready for kindergarten than their classmates who came from homes with enough to eat. It shows that kids who experienced food insecurity in their first five years of life are more likely to be lagging behind in social, emotional and to some degree, cognitive skills when they begin kindergarten."

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Pedagogical Knowledge and the Changing Nature of the Teaching Profession
Source: OECD, February 21, 2017

Excerpt: "Highly qualified and competent teachers are fundamental for equitable and effective education systems. Teachers today are facing higher and more complex expectations to  help students reach their full potential and become valuable members of 21st century society. The nature and variety of these demands imply that teachers, more than ever before, must be professionals who make decisions based on a robust and updated knowledge base."

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Exploring The Future of Parent Education
Source: Lyle S. Hallman Foundation, March 21, 2017

Excerpt: "There is a lot of guesswork in parenting and when I need answers I come to places like the Early Years Centre. I learn from other moms and the people who work there. The other day, I watched a mom handle a conflict between our two kids. She got down on the floor with them, spoke so patiently and the problem was settled peacefully. I learned a lot from watching her and have started doing what she does."

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Associations between breastfeeding and select health outcomes for off-reserve First Nations, Métis, and Inuit children in Canada
Source: Statistics Canada, March 20, 2017

Excerpt: "Past research has shown that breastfeeding is related to positive health outcomes among infants and children, but less is known about the possible benefits of breastfeeding among specific groups of Aboriginal children. Today, a new study fills this gap by examining the relationship between breastfeeding and the prevalence of asthma/chronic bronchitis and chronic ear infections among First Nations children living off reserve, Métis children and Inuit children."

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The Dual Nature of Early-Life Experience on Somatosensory Processing in the Human Infant Brain
Source: Current Biology, March 16, 2017

Excerpt: "The results of our study have important clinical implications for infants cared for in NICUs and for those aiming to improve their neurodevelopmental outcomes. Current efforts aim to minimize the number and intensity of painful procedures, especially through non-pharmacological pain management. Concurrently, family-centered initiatives and therapeutic interventions may remedy the relative paucity of supportive tactile experiences, a common problem in referral center NICUs, where geography, socioeconomic conditions, and support systems impact parents’ direct involvement with their infants."

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Kindergartners Enter More Ready in Math and Literacy, Researchers Say
Source: Education Week, March 7, 2017

Excerpt: "Daphna Bassok at the University of Virginia and Scott Latham of Stanford University looked at teacher assessments of the skills of their kindergarten students in 1998 and in 2010."

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Provincial report #1
Source: Ontario Child Health Study, March 2017

Excerpt: "This report includes results on students’ self-perceptions of mental health difficulties, the use of mental health services, and perspectives on accessing help.  We also include teacher and principal perspectives on barriers to addressing student mental health."

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Behavioural problems in children linked to poor sleep, says a study
Source: Hindustan Times, March 12, 2017

Excerpt: "Children between age three and seven who do not get enough sleep are more likely to have problems with attention, emotional control and peer relationships, says a study. “We found that children who get an insufficient amount of sleep in their pre-school and early school-age years have a higher risk of poor neuro-behavioral function at around age 7,” said lead researcher Elsie Taveras from the MassGeneral Hospital for Children in the US."

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Report Card 2017
Source: Children's Rights Alliance, February 22, 2017

Excerpt: "The Government is awarded an overall 'D+' grade in Report Card 2017, reflecting a barely acceptable performance to date with little or no positive impact on children. However, it must be remembered that this Government has only been in power since May 2016. While the highest grade in Report Card 2017 is a 'B' for Subsidised and School-Age Childcare, the lowest grades have been awarded for Child and Family Homelessness and Traveller and Roma Children, both receiving an 'E'. The Children's Rights Alliance acknowledges the important groundwork that has been carried out in a number of areas but it is clear that much more must be done. We look forward to seeing greater progress over the coming year."

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Outsideplay.ca
Source: outsideplay.ca, March 9, 2017

Excerpt: "An online tool to help parents and caregivers gain the confidence to allow their kids to engage in more outdoor play."

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Estimating the Cost of Raising Children: Setting the Agenda for Canada
Source: Campaign 2000, March 7, 2017

Excerpt: "Arguments on the need for childcare continue to be framed around women’s, rather than couples’, labour force participation, even though in two-parent families most children who have an employed mother also have an employed father, and children of same-sex couples may have two employed mothers or two employed fathers."

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Study finds disruptive children do not inspire similar behavior in their siblings
Source: Medical Xpress, March 6, 2017

Excerpt: "The research, conducted in collaboration with Dr. Jennifer Jenkins and colleagues at the University of Toronto and funded by the Canadian Institute for Health Research, examines the role of sibling training on disruptive behavior during early childhood and concludes that disruptive behavior produces greater disparity—rather than resemblance—among siblings."

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Global Report on Equity Early Childhood
Source: Consultative Group on Early Childhood Care and Development, c/o International Step by Step Association, 2016

Excerpt” "ECCE’s effectiveness as a tool for equity is moderated by the extent to which it is viewed as a public, as opposed to a private, responsibility. This perspective will be reflected in how ECCE is delivered and overseen, and ultimately whom it serves."

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Family Socioeconomic Status Moderates Associations Between Television Viewing and School Readiness Skills.
Source: Ovid Insights, February 24, 2017

Excerpt: "Television viewing is negatively associated with children’s school readiness skills, and this association increased as family income decreased. Active efforts to reinforce AAP guidelines to limit the amount of television children watch should be made, especially for children from middle- to lower-income families."

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Deprivation in early childhood can affect mental health in adulthood, according to landmark study
Source: Science Daily, February 23, 2017

Excerpt: "Experiencing severe deprivation and neglect in childhood can have a lasting psychological impact into early adulthood, according to a unique study which has followed the mental health of a group of children adopted from Romanian institutions to UK families in the 1990s."

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New study shows babbling is good for baby’s brain development
Source: Today’s Parent, February 21, 2017

Excerpt: "Early results show two-thirds of participating families improve. Children who started the program hearing an average of 8,000 words a day were averaging 12,000 a day when the coaching ended, Molina said. Brown University has begun an independent study to track whether the improvement was enough to make a difference once those children begin kindergarten."

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