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Resources > News > Archived News & Resources from the e-Newsletter - October 2016

Archived News & Resources from the e-Newsletter - October 2016

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News

ON: “I’m More Than ‘Just’ an ECE”: Decent Work from the Perspective of Ontario’s Early Childhood Workforce
Source: AECEO, October 26, 2016

Description: "A new report from the Association of Early Childhood Educators Ontario highlights issues faced by the workforce. The report – “I’m more than ‘just’ an ECE”: Decent work from the perspective of Ontario's early childhood workforce – reports on consultations with educators and child care staff across Ontario. Through this project we have identified that there is a widening ‘early childhood professionalization gap,’ whereby the expectations of early childhood educators are increasing while wages and working conditions are stagnant."

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ON: Put Diaper Change Tables in Men’s Bathrooms, Ontario Dad’s Group Pleads After Changing Kids on Floor
Source: National Post, October 21, 2016

Excerpt: "With more fathers shouldering a greater share of the child-care load, a London, Ont., men’s group is lobbying local businesses to make diaper duty easier for dads. Dad Club London, a support network for fathers, created a petition asking family-friendly establishments to install change tables in men’s washrooms. For father of two Jeremy McCall, coming across a baby station in a men’s bathroom is a rare thing."

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CA: Should You Keep a Late-Birthday Child Back from Starting School?
Source: The Globe and Mail, October 27, 2016

Excerpt: "Charles Pascal, a professor of human development and applied psychology at OISE (the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education), says that one of the benefits of having children in kindergarten earlier is that if there is a developmental issue, it is more likely to be identified early, allowing parents and educators to take action earlier."

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CA: It's About Time We Give Parental Leave a Much-Needed Facelift
Source: Winnipeg Free Press, October 21, 2016

Excerpt: "If children truly matter, and if Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is to follow through on his claims to be a feminist, we know he will do the right thing. Namely, lower eligibility criteria for maternity- and parental-leave benefits to match Quebec at 186 hours. Children need parents with income security. The federal government’s proposed policy changes will not provide this basic security. It will have zero benefit for more than one-third of Canadian children."

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BC: UVic Students and Faculty Want After-School Daycare Cuts Put into Time Out
Source: CBC News, October 25, 2016

Excerpt: "A University of Victoria grad student says he and his wife might not be able to finish their degrees because of coming changes to child care on campus. Jonathan Faerber is among several students and faculty who are upset an after-school care program at the university for their kids is being cut. The school plans to cut the after-school care program, which has 45 spots for children six to 12 years old, in order to create 40 spaces for full-day daycare for children three to five years old."

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BC: Williams Lake Kindergarten Has Great Outdoors for Classroom
Source: CBC News, October 23, 2016

Excerpt: "A new kindergarten class in Williams Lake is seeing some real success in the classroom, its teacher says, although the class isn't a room at all. Sylvia Swift is teaching the school district's first "nature kindergarten" which keeps kids outside all day to add a natural element to the lessons. Kids don't sit at desks: instead, they sit on stumps. They go on walks and look for what's changing in the environment; they read and they build with wood among other activities."

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AB: It Takes a Village
Source: Alberta Views Magazine, September 19, 2016

Excerpt: "The case for universal publicly funded daycare is not an easy sell. “Universal” means available to everyone. Publicly funded means no parental fees for any program, since even modest fees can discourage enrolment by lower-income families. But as University of Calgary population health researchers Lindsay McLaren and Lynn McIntyre note, “There is a powerful logic to directing efforts and resources to those who need them most.”"

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NU: Nunavut Adopts Finland's Baby Box Program to Reduce Infant Mortality
Source: CBC News, October 26, 2016

Excerpt: "Nunavut is giving out more than 800 baby boxes to parents of newborns in an attempt to reduce the territory's high rate of infant mortality. The territory's birth rate is the highest in Canada and about 850 babies are expected to be born in Nunavut in 2016-17. Nunavut also has the highest rate of infant mortality in the country, with a rate five times higher than the national average."

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US: Why Child Care Preferences of Parents--Not Politicians--Should Prevail
Source: Forbes, October 26, 2016

Excerpt: "American households today look starkly different from generations past. While in 1975 more than half of children were cared for by a full-time, stay-at-home parent, today that number is less than one-third. What’s more, the Pew Research Center recently found that only 23 percent of working mothers would choose to work full-time if they had the choice."

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AU: The Billions We Spend on Childcare is Failing Women, the Economy and Children
Source: The Sydney Morning Herald, October 25, 2016

Excerpt: "The cost of childcare for Australian families is well above the average among the advanced country members of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development we're often compared with. Out-of-pocket childcare costs absorb 27 per cent of average wages here, compared with the OECD average of 17 per cent, a 2014 Productivity Commission report said. And that's despite rising government subsidies."

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IN: Delhi Government to Open Early Childhood Education Centres
Source: The Times of India, October 20, 2016

Excerpt: ""We are setting up Early Childhood Care & Education Centres in Delhi. Our government is very much serious about this project. We need almost 3,000 ECCE centres," Sisodia said. He said that these 3,000 centres, once opened, would prepare about 2.5-300,000 children for schools over three years."

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Vast Majority of Toronto Parents Can’t Afford Daycare
Source: Toronto Star, October 18, 2016

Excerpt: "If nothing is done to address Toronto’s ruinously high cost of daycare, there is no point in adding many more spaces, a ground-breaking city report warns. Three-quarters of city families can’t afford licensed child care, according to the report, the first of its kind to quantify parent demand and affordability."

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ON: Ontario Bringing More Child Care to Families in Simcoe and York Regions
Source: Government of Ontario, October 20, 2016

Excerpt: "Ontario is creating 211 new licensed child care spaces in Simcoe and York regions, increasing the availability of safe, high-quality, child care for local families, and promoting early learning and development."

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ON: Toronto Daycare: A System in Trouble (video)
Source: Global News, October 18, 2016

Description: "In part one of our daycare series, we explore the role of the ECE (Early Childhood Educator). Many in the daycare system believe the sector is underpaid. This, combined with a heavy workload and part-time or split shifts is making many ECEs reconsider their career choice."

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SK: U of S Childcare Spaces Reach 200 With New Centre
Source: CBC News, October 17, 2016

Excerpt: "This new standalone child care centre has space for 90 kids, from six months to six years old."

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US: The Anti-Helicopter Parent’s Plea: Let Kids Play!
Source: The New York Times, October 19, 2016

Excerpt: "Research suggests that students with controlling “helicopter” parents are less flexible and more vulnerable, anxious and self-conscious, as well as more likely to be medicated for anxiety or depression. Similarly, children whose time is highly structured — crammed with lessons and adult-supervised activities — may have more difficulty developing their own “executive function” capabilities, the ability to devise their own plans and carry them out. Conversely, the more time children spend in free play, the better they develop these capabilities."

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US: Rhetoric vs. Reality: Child Care
Source: Center for American Progress, October 19, 2016

Excerpt: "The outdated notion that early care and education is simply babysitting undermines the important work that child care workers do every day. The early childhood workforce takes on the responsibility of caring for children at a critical stage in their development, when children undergo tremendous physical growth and develop key cognitive and social-emotional skills. Research shows that high-quality learning environments enhance child development, and that a skilled and well-educated workforce is integral to program quality. Sensitive and responsive caregiving from a provider who engages in nurturing interactions with children and creates developmentally appropriate learning opportunities in the classroom requires a great deal of knowledge and experience."

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US: 'Satellite Babies' Are a Sad Fallout of the High Cost of Child Care
Source: She Knows, October 15, 2016

Excerpt: "Researchers have found some benefit in young children living in another country with their grandparents, including language immersion, but the story also highlighted the heartbreak of the parents who send their young children away (one thing that stuck with me was the mother who said that she cried for a month after she sent her daughter to China.)"

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AU: Labor's Kate Ellis Urges Radical Overhaul of Childcare System
Source: The Guardian, October 19, 2016

Excerpt: "Ellis noted models for childcare overseas including systems in which: Early education is free and part of the school system (France); Childcare has caps on out-of-pocket costs (Denmark, Norway and parts of Canada); Children are guaranteed a minimum number of hours of free early education (New Zealand, UK); Children have a legal right to childcare places (Germany, Finland and Sweden); Ellis said there were “many possible models” for reform and Labor would undertake national consultation to develop a long-term plan."

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IE: Childcare Providers ‘Are Taking Out Loans Just to Pay Staff’
Source: The Irish Times, October 19, 2016

Excerpt: "Some childcare providers in the State are taking out bridging loans to pay their staff because their financial situations are so precarious, an Oireachtas committee has heard."

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ZA: Investing in Early Childhood Education Pays Off
Source: Mail & Guardian, October 14, 2016

Excerpt: "Investing more resources for the poorest children in the first four years of their lives is a low-cost solution that yields a higher rate of return for each dollar invested than interventions directed at older children and adults."

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ON: Ontario Bringing More Child Care to Waterloo Region Families
Source: Government of Ontario, October 12, 2016

Excerpt: "Ontario is creating 88 new licensed child care spaces in the Waterloo Region, increasing the availability of safe, high-quality, child care for local families. The five new child care rooms for infants, toddlers and pre-schoolers will be located in the new St. Boniface Catholic School, which is scheduled to open in 2019. The spaces will give more families the opportunity to transition from child care into full-day kindergarten at the same location."

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ON: Helping Families in Niagara Region with Quality Child Care
Source: Government of Ontario, October 11, 2016

Excerpt: "Today, Premier Kathleen Wynne visited the onsite child care centre at Glynn A. Green Public School in Fonthill, where the government supported a retrofit of existing rooms to help create more than 30 new licensed child care spaces for toddlers and pre-schoolers."

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CA: ‘Not Enough Spaces’: Families Share Child Care Wait-List Nightmares
Source: Global News, October 7, 2016

Excerpt: "Vancouver’s director of social policy, Mary Clare Zak, admitted there’s a “significant lack of spaces.” The city doesn’t have a centralized wait list, but says there are 32,000 kids waiting for a spot at one of 14-city-owned downtown facilities run by the Vancouver Society of Children’s Centres (VSOCC). The non-profit organization is the city’s single largest child-care operator."

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CA: ‘Total Gong Show’: Parents Reveal Flaws of Child-Care Subsidy System
Source: Global News, October 6, 2016

Excerpt: "As O’Loughlin and her husband learned, there are some limitations to subsidies, too. Only select centres accept them, for one. There’s also a limited number of subsidies available (26,059 in Toronto to be exact). And families might have to wait a long time to get one."

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AU: Learning to Deliver Opportunity
Source: The Mercury, October 7, 2016

Excerpt: "From birth to starting school, children’s brains develop more, and faster, than at any other time in their life, particularly from prenatal to three years of age. The early experiences of a child set the foundations for their ability to learn social, emotional, behavioural, thinking and communication skills. These experiences are influenced by genes (parents) and the environment."

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IE: Universal Childcare Payment to be Unveiled in Budget

Source: The Irish Times, October 11, 2016

Excerpt: "The universal payment will kick in when the joint net parental income rises over an income threshold of about €47,000 for a family with one child. The threshold will rise if there are more children. Those below that threshold will receive a greater subsidy the lower their income is. Ms Zappone received a total increase in her departmental budget of about €150 million, according to sources."

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ON: Release of Ontario's 2015-16 Financial Statements
Source: Government of Ontario, October 3, 2016

Excerpt: "In 2015-16, the government built on this success by: Increasing wages for early childhood educators and other child care professionals in licensed child care settings by providing a $1 per hour wage increase for eligible child care workers bringing the total wage increase up to $2 per hour, plus benefits."

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CA: How Child Care Costs Compare in Canada (Hint: They’re Way More Than Tuition)
Source: Global News, October 3, 2016

Excerpt: "In Vancouver and Toronto, a year of daycare for your baby costs more than a year of university tuition fees to study law, engineering, pharmacy, nursing, business, education, arts, humanities, architecture, math or veterinary medicine."

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CA: When it Comes to Raising Children, Be a Gardener, Not a Carpenter (audio)
Source: CBC Radio, October 2, 2016

Excerpt: "When it comes to raising children, one thing there is no shortage of is advice. Experts tell us how to deal with sleep issues and potty training; how to raise toddlers who are disciplined, curious and capable; how to help children score A's at school; and how to turn teenagers into responsible, caring and independent adults."

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NU: Ample Nunavik Childcare Boosts Number of Women in Labour Force
Source: Nunatsiaq Online, September 29, 2016

Excerpt: "They also looked at the Quebec-subsidized daycare program that rolled out across the region in the 1990s. Since then, Nunavik has seen an unprecedented increase in the number of available child care places for children under five years of age, from 3.4 spaces per 100 children in 1990 to 66.2 per 100 children in 2007. Today, the region has more and less expensive child care spaces than any other Inuit region. That’s led to 7.8 percentage point increase in Inuit women’s participation in Nunavik’s labour force, CSLS researchers found, from 57.4 per cent in 1996 to 64.8 per cent in 2011."

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NU: Feds Eye Daycare in Iqaluit in Hopes of Retaining Employees

Source: CBC News, September 26, 2016

Excerpt: "The federal government is considering building a daycare in Iqaluit in the hopes of luring more employees and retaining the ones it has. Finding a place in one of the handful of daycares across the city can take years, forcing some families to leave town before a spot opens up."

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US: Why Parents Are Being Forced to Find Childcare Underground

Source: The Atlantic, October 3, 2016

Excerpt: "Due to state regulations, Nevarez cares for no more than four children unrelated to her at any given point. She charges $2.00 per hour per child in her community, regardless of what families make, to help keep the cost affordable. That means, at best, she’ll earn $8.00 an hour to care for four children. But if she takes toddlers from low-income families receiving a state subsidy to help them pay for care, she may make as little as $1.58 per hour per child. That’s $6.32 per hour for four kids (according to state rates for a toddler receiving 40 hours of childcare per week)."

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US: Do ‘Kindy Bootcamps’ Get Children Ready for School?
Source: The Conversation, September 28, 2016

Excerpt: "A recent surge in private companies offering “skill and drill” school-readiness programs has been likened to “kindy bootcamps” by the media. These programs typically run for one hour a week (with fees in the range of A$40 an hour) for small groups of around five children aged between two and five. The programs are often housed within companies that also offer tutoring to school-age children. They are not regulated or accredited, as child care, preschool and kindergarten full-time programs are. Parents with disposable incomes seem to be seeking out these add-on programs to ease their anxieties about their child’s future academic achievement and competitive entry into elite schools."

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Resources

Commission sur l'éducation à la petite enfance
Source: Institut du Nouveau Mond, October 21, 2016

Description: "Access presentations and oral recordings from the public hearings of experts in Montreal October 12-13, 2016, including Atkinson Centre’s own Fellow in Early Childhood Policy, Kerry McCuaig."

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EDI BC: 2016 Provincial Report
Source: Human Early Learning Partnership, October 26, 2016

Description: " Explore EDI vulnerability rates & trends for BC kids via our new interactive EDI BC 2016 Provincial Report."

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Probe Research Poll Shows Huge Public Support for Child Care in Manitoba!
Source: Manitoba Child Care Association, October 25, 2016

Excerpt: "Three in four surveyed agree a universal child care system, where every child who needs a space gets one, ought to be a priority of the new Progressive Conservative government.  As of September 30, 2016 there are 15,273 children on the online registry wait list, an increase of over 3200 in the past 9 months.  The shortage of licensed child care creates significant anxiety for families, worried they will not have a reliable space when they need it.  A majority of Manitobans (58%) agree they are willing to pay a little more in taxes for a universal child care system."

http://mccahouse.org/probe-research-poll-shows-huge-public-support-child-care-manitoba/

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Child-Care Costs in Canada Among Highest in the World, OECD Says
Source: CBC News, October 21, 2016

Excerpt: "Canadian families spend almost one-quarter of their income on child care, a ratio that is much higher than in other parts of the world, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development says."

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Media and Young Minds
Source: Pediatrics, October 2016

Excerpt: "Infants, toddlers, and preschoolers are now growing up in environments saturated with a variety of traditional and new technologies, which they are adopting at increasing rates. Although there has been much hope for the educational potential of interactive media for young children, accompanied by fears about their overuse during this crucial period of rapid brain development, research in this area still remains limited. This policy statement reviews the existing literature on television, videos, and mobile/interactive technologies; their potential for educational benefit; and related health concerns for young children (0 to 5 years of age)."

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Are Parents Overrating the Quality of Child Care?
Source: NPR, October 17, 2016

Excerpt: "Our findings suggest that parents value and seek out quality child care and believe it benefits their child and themselves," says Gillian SteelFisher, research scientist and deputy director of the Harvard Opinion Research Program and the poll's academic leader. "However, we also found that parents face challenges related to the limited options they have for child care, the cost, and a lack of information about its quality."

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Teaching: An Act of Kindness? University of British Columbia Research Suggests Students Believe So
Source: Parent Herald, October 15, 2016

Excerpt: "In the recent study conducted by The University of British Columbia (UBC) and published in the Journal of Childhood Studies, findings showed that 42 percent of students from kindergarten to third grade believe that teaching is an "act of kindness." UBC's Okanagan campus assistant professor John Tyler Binfet explained most if not all young students are "attentive" to the kindness displayed by their teachers."

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The Best and Worst Places to be a Woman in Canada 2016 - The Gender Gap in Canada's 25 Biggest Cities
Source: Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives, October 13, 2016

Excerpt: "Some gaps are closing. Women in Canada now make up 48% of the labour force. They are as likely to have some form of post-secondary education as are men. They are more likely to have a university degree. Their lifespans are amongst the highest in the world. These are achievements of which we can be proud. These are achievements we can learn from. They point to our capacity to make better lives for ourselves, our children, our neighbors. Narrowing the gender gap will deliver dividends for all Canadians."

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Relations of Preschoolers' Visual-Motor and Object Manipulation Skills with Executive Function and Social Behavior
Source: Research Quarterly for Exercise and Sport, October 12, 2016

Excerpt: "Children's visual-motor integration and object manipulation skills in the fall have modest to moderate relations with executive function and social behaviors later in the preschool year. These findings have implications for early learning initiatives and school readiness."

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Examining Rhetorics of Play in Curricula in Five Provinces: Is Play at Risk in Canadian Kindergartens?
Source: Canadian Journal of Education, 2016

Excerpt: "In this article, school division and Ministry of Education–based early childhood consultants and university researchers respond to the question of whether play is at risk in kindergartens in five Canadian provinces by analyzing current and previous kindergarten curricula using Sutton-Smith’s framework of rhetorics of play. We find that play is integral to kindergarten curricula in Saskatchewan and Ontario, but only implicitly mentioned in the Alberta, British Columbia, and Manitoba curricula where support documents provide more support for play."

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Setting the Play Environment
Source: Science of Early Child Development, October 7, 2016

Excerpt: "A well accepted core value in early childhood care and education is that children come to understand the world through play and play-based learning. In fact, it has been said that play is the “work” of childhood. Curriculum, program philosophy, educator training, and the design and organization of classrooms and play materials are some of the factors that influence the opportunities that children have for meaningful play experiences."

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Child Obesity Not Linked to Daycare: Study
Source: Global News, October 11, 2016

Excerpt: "While several previous observational studies have suggested children in daycare may be more likely to gain too much weight than similar kids cared for by parents at home, the current study looked at data on more than 10,000 youngsters and found no such connection."

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McGill Researcher Looks at How Children Perceive Lies
Source: CBC News, October 10, 2016

Excerpt: "Parents have a huge influence on how children think about lying, especially in their younger years, Talwar said. Is it good to tell kids to never tell a lie? While Talwar acknowledged there are different schools of thought on the subject, she said it depends on what a child can absorb according to their age. For young children, seeing truth and lies as black and white is easiest to handle."

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Early Childcare, Maternal Education and Family Origins: Differences in Cognitive and Linguistic Outcomes throughout Childhood
Source: RCIS, October 10, 2016

Excerpt: "Centre-based care in early childhood has been associated with better scores on linguistic and cognitive tests at later times. Nevertheless, there is no consensus about the stability of these effects across the preschool and primary school stages. Furthermore, no data about the effects of early care have been reported from the Italian context. Our study analysed the effects of early childcare, maternal education and parental origin (native versus foreign) on the cognitive and linguistic outcomes of pre-schoolers and pupils."

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Analyzing Early Child Development, Influential Conditions, And Future Impacts: Prospects of a German Newborn Cohort Study
Source: 7th Space, October 8, 2016

Excerpt: "The paper provides an overview of a German cohort study of newborns which includes a representative sample of about 3500 infants and their mothers. The aims, challenges, and solutions concerning the large-scale assessment of early child capacities and skills as well as the measurements of learning environments that impact early developmental progress are presented and discussed."
 

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Main Breadwinner Women in Hungary and Their Work-family Balance Related Coping Strategies
Source: Intersections East European Journal of Society and Politics, October 6, 2016

Excerpt: "In this study, being the first Hungarian qualitative study devoted to this subject, we focus on the work-life balance situation of Hungarian women acting as main breadwinners within their family. The empirical base of our study consisted of 22 in-depth interviews conducted with Hungarian mothers of dependent children younger than 14, living in (heterosexual) couple households, who bring in at least 60% of the total household earnings. We examined how the main breadwinner role might affect the gender norm expectations acquired during socialisation, the division of domestic labour and child care duties between the partners, as well as the internal power relations of the couple."

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Early Childhood: Fostering the Vitality of Francophone Minority Communities
Source: Office of the Commissioner of Official Languages, October 3, 2016

Excerpt: "This report presents an overview of early childhood in Francophone communities in order to identify key issues and opportunities. It also contains recommendations addressed to the Government of Canada, given the federal government’s commitment under Part VII of the Official Languages Act and the resulting obligations of federal institutions."

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Ending Extreme Poverty: A Focus on Children
Source: UNICEF, October 3, 2016

Excerpt: "Ending Extreme Poverty: A Focus on Children – a briefing note from the World Bank Group and UNICEF - finds that children in developing countries are more than twice as likely as adults to live in extreme poverty. In 2013, 19.5 per cent of children in developing countries were living in households that survived on an average of US$1.90 a day or less per person, compared to just 9.2 per cent of adults. Globally, almost 385 million children were living in extreme poverty."

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Making Education Count for Development - Data Collection and Availability in Six PISA for Development Countries
Source: OECD, September 28, 2016

Excerpt: "This report reviews the collection, availability and quality of system-level data and metadata on education from countries participating in the PISA for Development project: Cambodia, Ecuador, Guatemala, Paraguay, Senegal and Zambia. PISA for Development aims to increase low income countries’ use of PISA assessments for monitoring progress towards national goals for improving education and for analysing the factors associated with student learning outcomes, particularly among poor and marginalised populations. The project also helps track progress towards the international education targets defined in the Education 2030 Framework for Action, which the international community adopted in 2015 as the strategy for achieving the Education Sustainable Development Goal (SDG)."

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