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News

ON: Change to Ontario Cabinet Increases Focus on Child Care
Source: Government of Ontario, August 24, 2016

Excerpt: "Indira Naidoo-Harris, MPP for Halton, becomes Associate Minister of Education (Early Years and Child Care). She will lead the government's efforts, in partnership with the Minister of Education, to build a high-quality, accessible and affordable early years and child care system that supports choice and flexibility for parents and promotes healthy development for children."

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CA: Kids Are Getting Too Much Screen Time – And it’s Affecting Their Development
Source: National Post, August 23, 2016

Excerpt: "The consequences of reduced attachment and impeded social interaction are wide-ranging and troubling to researchers like Swingle, particularly as problems have begun to present themselves among toddlers. “What we’re seeing with this group is that they’re attaching to objects instead of peers and parents,” she says. “They don’t respond to parental calls as much. When we talk about straight discipline and obedience, they’re not responding to parents as much. They tantrum without their devices. They don’t know how to self-occupy or play – and play is learning at that age.”"

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CA: Families Seeking Flexible Daycare Options Turn to Visiting Au Pairs
Source: CBC News, August 16, 2016

Excerpt: "Her two boys, aged three and five, needed full-time care, a chauffeur to various activities and an energetic playmate. So she turned to the internet to find their next caregiver and joined a growing number of Canadians seeking new ways to manage what can be frustratingly hard-to-find child care — by hiring an au pair."

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CA: The Movement to Bring Back ‘Risky’ Play for Children
Source: Globe & Mail, August 10, 2016

Excerpt: "Norwegian researcher Ellen Sandseter, one of the world’s leading advocates for risky play, defines it as any activity that is thrilling or exciting and involves some possibility of physical injury. In the nearly 10 years since Sandseter began examining the subject, multiple studies have linked risky play to a raft of benefits, including better balance and co-ordination, as well as improved creativity and social skills."

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BC: Looking for Daycare in Vancouver? Good Luck
Source: CBC News, August 22, 2016

Excerpt: "Major licensed childcare facilities in Vancouver already have 2,000 to 3,000 children on their wait list, according to Westcoast Child Care Resource Centre, a resource for early childcare educators and parents in the City of Vancouver. "There is only enough space for 20 to 25 per cent of children that need it," said executive director Pam Preston. "The reverse of that is, 75 to 80 per cent of children who need it cannot find it in the licensed, regulated market," she said."

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BC: B.C. Parents Petition for Outdoor Preschools
Source: CBC News, August 10, 2016

Excerpt: ""The benefits for physical wellbeing for oneself, mental cognitive wellbeing for oneself, as well as for the benefits of learning experience — experiential learning — all of these are benefits of being outdoors." The outdoor school has been popular in many Scandinavian countries for years, he said, and is increasing in popularity here too."

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MB: Child Care Shortage in Manitoba
Source: CBC News, August 23, 2016

Excerpt: "Most facilities have a waiting list, and there’s also an online registry parents can sign up for – both can be very long. "There's more than 14 thousand names on the online registry, for a little over 34 thousand spaces here in Manitoba," said Pat Wege, executive director of the Manitoba Child Care Association."

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MB: Why Manitoba Needs to Invest in its Children
Source: The Battlefords News-Optimist, August 18, 2016

Excerpt: "Poverty, limited education, historical trauma and colonization - to name just a few factors - can be linked to Manitoba's high rates of infant mortality and kids in care. And it all puts children at risk for other negative health and social outcomes. Clearly this is morally unacceptable. But what's less often discussed is that failing the province's children also puts Manitoba in economic jeopardy. Unless something is done to turn around the troublesome rates of infant mortality and the disturbing number of children taken into care each year, Manitoba will lag in economic productivity."

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NL: Full-Day Kindergarten Ready to Roll Out Across N.L.
Source: CBC News, August 25, 2016

Excerpt: "Kindergarten students in Newfoundland and Labrador will mark a historic milestone on Sept. 7, when they begin attending full-day classes, province wide, for the first time."

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US: Child Care Pay Lags at Bottom of Pay Scale, As Advocates Urge Higher Standards and Better Training
Source: Deseret News, August 21, 2016

Except: "The 2011 U.S. Census Bureau survey reports that over 23 percent of children under five are cared for by organized day care facilities, as opposed to in home care by friends or relatives. And child development experts are increasingly concerned about the quality of care this rising generation receives."

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US: Affordable Child Care: The Secret to a Better Economy
Source: The New York Times, August 19, 2016

Excerpt: "Of the 24 million children under 6 in the United States today, some 12 million need day care, because both parents work or a single parent is the breadwinner. Yet most working families can’t afford good care — if they can even find it in the first place. In 2006, a federal study gave a “high quality” rating to only 10 percent of the nation’s child care programs, and the proportion today is almost certainly smaller, since government financing for child care has declined in the past decade."

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US: When Children Are Diagnosed with a Sensory Disorder
Source: The Wall Street Journal, August 15, 2016

Excerpt: "Treatments at the STAR Institute are play-based and include parents. Children in sensory gyms are put in swings, nets or ball pits and exposed to different stimuli so they can learn to detect, regulate and interpret sensations and produce the appropriate motor and behavioral responses. “You try to give them sensation playing with them,” says Dr. Miller, who has degrees in occupational therapy and early-childhood special education. Most of her patients are between 3 and 7 years old."

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UK: Why Britain Said 'Yes' to Universal Preschool
Source: The Atlantic, August 23, 2016

Excerpt: "Any child in England who has turned 3 by Sept. 1 is guaranteed 15 hours a week of free childcare or preschool for 38 weeks a year, or 570 hours total, paid for by the national government. “We don’t think of it as socialism at all,” said the Oxford University professor Edward Melhuish, who studies child development and was instrumental in conducting the research that largely led to England’s current policies. “We think of it as common sense.”"

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NZ: New Zealand's Most Shameful Secret: 'We Have Normalised Child Poverty'

Source: The Guardian, August 16, 2016

Excerpt: "A third of New Zealand children, or 300,000, now live below the poverty line – 45,000 more than a year ago. Unicef’s definition of child poverty in New Zealand is children living in households who earn less than 60% of the median national income – NZ$28,000 a year, or NZ$550 a week. The fact that twice as many children now live below the poverty line than did in 1984 has become New Zealand’s most shameful statistic."

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ON: Ontario Helping Students with Special Needs Reach Their Full Potential
Source: Government of Ontario, August 8, 2016

Excerpt: "Today Ontario is announcing next steps to strengthen supports for students who are deaf or hard of hearing, blind or have low vision, deafblind, or have severe learning disabilities."

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ON: Ontario Keeping Children's Centres Safe and Accessible
Source: Government of Ontario, August 4, 2016

Excerpt: "Ontario is investing $16 million in more than 550 facility upgrades and repair projects at more than 140 community agencies across the province to help them better serve Ontario's children, youth and families."

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ON: Ontario Ending Fees for Child Care Wait Lists
Source: Government of Ontario, August 2, 2016

Excerpt: "Ontario has filed a regulation to end fees for child care wait lists to improve the accessibility of child care and make life easier for families. The ban will take effect September 1, 2016, and will prevent licensed child care centres and home child care agencies from charging fees or requiring deposits to join child care wait lists."

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ON: City of Toronto Tool Used for Child Care Endorsed by Scholars

Source: CanIndia.com, July 28, 2016

Excerpt: "The Toronto Children’s Services’ Assessment for Quality Improvement (AQI) tool is an accurate way to determine quality in early learning and child care settings, according to a recently published article in the scholarly journal Early Education and Development. The endorsement makes the AQI the only peer-reviewed and validated improvement tool for child care developed in Canada."

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CA: Day Care: Canada’s Silent Crisis
Source: Toronto Star, August 9, 2016

Excerpt: "The child care shortage in Canada is a silent crisis that leaves too many new parents stressed and scrambling, too many children without safe, nurturing places to learn and play, and, as the new finance department briefing note points out, this silent crisis leaves too many mothers on the sidelines of the labour market."

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CA: Fewer Canadian Mothers Work Outside Home than Other Rich Countries
Source: Globe & Mail, August 4, 2016

Excerpt: "“Canadian women with children are less involved in the labour market than women in many OECD countries,” said the partially redacted briefing note, obtained recently by The Canadian Press under the Access to Information Act. “In particular, prime-aged Canadian women with young children (aged less than six years) stand out as a group.” The document said the factors behind the participation rate of women in Canada with young children was connected to several interrelated factors, including education attainment, spouse’s income, labour market conditions, tax rates, child benefits and the availability of affordable child care."

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BC: Grandparent Caregivers: We Need More Support for Our Kids
Source: CBC News, August 8, 2016

Excerpt: "With over 11,000 families in B.C. headed by primary grandparent caregivers, the Parent Support Services Society of B.C. says the provincial government should provide grandparents with the same financial and social support foster parents receive."

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BC: 1,100 Parents Get a Boost from New Child Benefit

Source: The Northern View, August 3, 2016

Excerpt: "In Prince Rupert, there were 1,100 payments issued in July as part of the Canada Child Benefit, as reported by the Canada Revenue Agency. For a population of more than 13,000 residents with nearly 2,000 between the ages of six to 17, there is a significant number of families benefitting from the new tax-free income."

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AB: Dayhome Licensing Review Underway in Alberta
Source: CBC News, August 5, 2016

Excerpt: "The difference between a licensed and unlicensed day home is oversight by organizations like Child Development Dayhomes (CDD), one of dozens falling under the umbrella of the AFCCA, said Crowther, who is also an assistant director of the Calgary-based CDD. "We have a set of standards from the government that are followed," she said."

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MB: Manitoba to Maintain Programs for Low-Income Families

Source: CBC News, August 2, 2016

Excerpt: "Roughly one in three children in Manitoba live in poverty, according to Campaign 2000, a national coalition that seeks to build support for the 1989 House of Commons resolution to end child poverty. With the introduction of the CCB, 21,000 Manitoba children — or just over half — will be lifted above the low-income cut off."

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US: A Labor of Love (Not Money): How the Child Care Non-System Hurts its Own Workers
Source: New America, August 4, 2016

Excerpt: "Nearly 12 million children between birth and age five are cared for by two million adults working in child care centers and homes each day. The country relies on these early educators - an ethnically and racially diverse and almost entirely female group - to provide high-quality care and education to our country’s youngest children. And though there is significant demand for this highly skilled work, systems (or more accurately non-systems) for preparing, supporting, and compensating early childhood teachers are woefully inadequate."

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US: What Boston's Preschools Get Right
Source: The Atlantic, August 2, 2016

Excerpt: "Boston’s preschool program, called K1 locally, serves about 68 percent of the 4-year-olds likely to enroll in public kindergarten. And while it has been criticized by some for its slow growth, the program has won repeated recognition from experts in the field for its quality and has been validated by outside researchers for being student-centered, learning-focused, and developmentally appropriate."

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US: Early Childhood Education Gets Push from $1 Billion Federal Investment

Source: The Washington Post, August 1, 2016

Excerpt: "Numerous studies have shown that children who receive a high-quality early education are more likely to succeed economically and socially. It is particularly a boon to high-needs students, giving them a leg up in future educational achievement."

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US: What Babies Know About Physics and Foreign Languages
Source: The New York Times, July 30, 2016

Excerpt: "We take it for granted that young children “get into everything.” But new studies of “active learning” show that when children play with toys they are acting a lot like scientists doing experiments. Preschoolers prefer to play with the toys that will teach them the most, and they play with those toys in just the way that will give them the most information about how the world works."

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AU: Reimagining NSW: Tackling Education Inequality with Early Intervention and Better Research
Source: The Conversation, August 3, 2016

Excerpt: "Investing in cognitive and non-cognitive skills in early childhood lead to higher wages and productivity, reduced crime, fewer teenage pregnancies and improved health outcomes. And the earlier the intervention, the larger the returns from every dollar spent."

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IE: Why We Need More Men Working in Our Creches
Source: The Irish Times, August 9, 2016

Excerpt: "Indeed, it could be argued that, for the early years workforce, gender imbalance is the least of their problems – but the dearth of men and the sector’s low status are not unconnected. Moloney agrees there are issues for both males and females, but she believes there are more for men who “have to break a glass ceiling”."

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Resources

Final Report and Recommendations of the Gender Wage Gap Strategy Steering Committee
Source: Government of Ontario, August 25, 2016

Excerpt: "It is unacceptable that the gender wage gap still exists. Progress on closing the gender wage gap has been slow and has stalled in recent years. From the consultations, it is clear that people in Ontario are ready for action. Given Ontario’s changing demographics and the need to attract and retain the most talented workforce, closing the gap makes good economic sense."

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Region of Waterloo Children’s Services: Early Learning and Child Care Service Plan - 2016-2020
Source: Region of Waterloo, August 2016

Excerpt: "High quality licensed early learning and child care comes at a significant financial cost to families. While Child Care Fee Subsidy may reduce the cost barrier for families who meet set income and other eligibility criteria, the high cost of child care remains the number one factor local parents reported they would change about their child care experience."

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Parents' Behaviours Key to Kids' Healthy Living, Ontario Survey Suggests
Source: CBC News, August23, 2016

Excerpt: ""Given the important role parents play in the lives of their children, we were keen to determine what types of parental behaviours were more likely to be associated with healthy living for their children. We learned that simple encouragement is not enough — active parental support is essential," she added. For example, Canadian guidelines suggest that kids between five and 17 years old get at least 60 minutes of moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activity per day. Only nine per cent of children do so."

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Report Shines Light on Poverty’s Role on Kids in CAS System

Source: Toronto Star, August 15, 2016

Excerpt: "On average, 15,625 Ontario children were in foster or group-home care in 2014-15. The latest figures indicate that only 2 per cent of children are removed from their home due to sexual abuse and 13 per cent for physical abuse. The rest are removed because of neglect, emotional maltreatment and exposure to violence between their parents or caregivers."

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Social Cognition in Preschoolers: Effect of Early Experience and Individual Differences
Source: Families and Societies, August 2, 2016

Excerpt: "This study aims at analysing the effect of early type of care (0-3 years of age), gender, migrant status and maternal education on the social cognition of 118 Italian preschoolers. All the measures were not parent- or teacher-reported, but assessed through direct observation of the children. Type of care in early infancy, migrant stratus and gender did not show a direct effect on social cognition, whereas maternal education showed a direct effect. Maternal education effect interacted with type of care, migrant status and gender."

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Annual Report 2015
Source: UNICEF, August 1, 2016

Excerpt: "The new global goals recognize the critical importance of promoting equity in access to child and maternal health care, proper nutrition, safe drinking water, birth registration, quality education and other essentials. By adopting the goals, the world’s governments committed to a pledge “that no one will be left behind ... and we will endeavour to reach the furthest behind first.”"

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Student Outcomes and Natural Schooling: Pathways from Evidence to Impact - Report 2016
Source: Plymouth University, July 14, 2016

Excerpt: "Studies of children in schoolyards/playgrounds found that children engage in more creative forms of play in the green areas. They also played more cooperatively (Dyment & Bell 2008). Play in nature is especially important for developing capacities for creativity, problem-solving, and intellectual development (Kellert 2005). According to the studies by Kellert (2005), nature is important to children’s development intellectually, emotionally, socially, spiritually and physically."

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