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Curriculum Studies & Teacher Development Program (CSTD)


 

The Curriculum Studies and Teacher Development Program of study leads to University of Toronto M.Ed., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees. The CSTD program is a forum for systematic reflection on the substance (subject matter, courses, programs of study), purposes, and practices used for bringing about learning in educational settings. Of concern are such fundamental issues as: what should be studied? Why? By whom? In what ways? And in what settings? Reflection upon such issues involves an interplay among the major components of education: subject matter, learning, teaching, and the larger social, political, and economic contexts as well as the immediate instructional situation. CSTD Program course offerings and guided research opportunities reflect the diverse interests of faculty in a range of areas.

CSTD Program - Research Areas

Curriculum Theories, Perspectives and Contexts
Curriculum Subject Matter and Teaching/Learning Processes
Diverse Student Populations and Curriculum Equity

CSTD Program - Faculty / Research Interests

CSTD Program - Degrees

♦ M.Ed.
♦ M.A.
♦ Ed.D.(suspended)
♦ Ph.D (Full-time and Flexible-Time options)

CSTD Program - Admission Requirements

CSTD Student Resources

♦ Comprehensive Exam Guidelines
♦ CSTD Program - Tips for Doctoral Applications (Examples and Criteria for submitting a sample of writing)
♦ CSTD Program Course Descriptions
♦ CSTD Program - Research Methods Courses



 

CSTD Program - Research Areas

Curriculum Studies and Teacher Development Program course offerings and research reflect the diverse skills and interests of a strong faculty and cover several broad categories of study.


Curriculum Theories, Perspectives and Contexts — include broad orientations and diverse settings for research in curriculum, schooling, teaching/learning, educational change to educational change:

  • Curriculum and Program Development, Implementation, and Evaluation
  • School and District Policy, Environments, Change and Reform
  • Assessment and Evaluation
  • Teacher Professional Learning, Teachers as Change Agents
  • Teachers' Work, Lives, Narratives, Beliefs and Knowledge
  • Holistic Education, Imagination, and Spirituality
  • Feminist and/or Queer Theories in Education
  • Cultural Studies and Critical Theory in Education
  • Dialogic and Social Constructivist Approaches to Curriculum
  • Education in Non-school Settings
  • Distance Education and On-line Learning Environments
  • Knowledge Media/Technology, Knowledge Building and Innovation
  • Education in Non-school and Adult Settings
  • Comparative Education and Education in International Settings

Curriculum Subject Matter and Teaching/Learning Processes — includes subject area content and/or pedagogical approaches:

  • Pedagogy, Instructional Design and Student Assessment
  • Student and/or Teacher Problem Solving and Critical Thinking
  • Arts and Aesthetic Education
  • Drama/Theatre Pedagogy
  • Health and Physical Education
  • Science and/or Technology Education
  • Mathematics Education
  • English Language, Children's Literature, and Literacy Education
  • Democratic Citizenship, Global Perspectives, and Social Sciences Education
  • Conflict/Peace Education
  • Critical and Social Justice Pedagogies

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Diverse Student Populations and Curriculum Equity — include challenges and issues in constructing and delivering curriculum for particular diverse students and/or for social change:

  • Adaptive Instruction and Inclusive Classrooms
  • French-Language Minority Education
  • Educating Immigrant and English as a Second Language Students
  • Gender and Education
  • Sexuality and Anti-Homophobia Education
  • Anti-Racist, Multicultural and Anti-discriminatory Education
  • Students' Identity Construction
  • Urban Youth
  • Early Childhood Education
  • Gifted Learners

Diversity and Equity Challenges in Curriculum — challenges in constructing and delivering curriculum for diverse students:

  • Special Education, Adaptive Instruction and Inclusive Classrooms
  • Franco-Ontarian and French-language Minority Education
  • Educating Immigrant and English as a Second Language Students
  • Gender and Girls' Education
  • Sexuality and Anti-homophobia Education
  • Equity Teaching, Anti-racist, Multicultural and Anti-discriminatory Education

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CSTD Program - Degrees

Master of Education (M.Ed.)

The M.Ed. program of study (Option IV) consists of ten half-courses, at least five of which are 1000-level courses normally undertaken in the Curriculum Studies and Teacher Development Program, and may be taken on a full- or part-time basis. Students are required to complete CTL1000H.  Additional study may be required either within the degree program or prior to admission depending on previous experience and academic qualifications.  Applicants should refer to the OISE Graduate Admissions. Ordinarily, students who enter this program will have a minimum of one year of professional experience.

In the Statement of Purpose, applicants should state the reasons they wish to study curriculum at the graduate level. The chief academic interests, professional concerns, and career plans within curriculum should be discussed. The admissions committee reviews this Statement to determine the kind of curriculum problem or area of study in which an applicant is most interested. It also looks for signs of his or her intellectual maturity and ability to write.

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Master of Arts (M.A.)

The M.A. degree program is designed to provide academic study and research training related to curriculum studies. Applicants are accepted under the general regulations. Admission normally requires a four-year University of Toronto bachelor's degree, or its equivalent, in a relevant discipline or professional program completed with standing equivalent to a University of Toronto mid-B or better in the final year. Ordinarily, applicants will have at least one year of relevant, successful, professional experience prior to applying. Students who anticipate going on to further study at the Ph.D. level are advised to apply for enrolment in an M.A. rather than an M.Ed. degree program. (See Graduate Admissions) for other admission and program requirements.
In the Statement of Intent, applicants should state the reasons they wish to undertake a research-oriented program of study in curriculum. The chief academic interests and experience, professional concerns, and career plans related to an aspect of curriculum studies should be discussed. In order to identify their research interests in their Statement of Intent, applicants should visit the Curriculum Studies and Teacher Development Program web page (www.oise.utoronto.ca/depts/ctl/programs/curriculum.shtml). The Admissions Committee reviews this Statement to determine the kind of curriculum problem or area of study in which an applicant is most interested and to link them to faculty advisors.

The M.A. may be taken on a full- or part-time basis and consists of eight half-courses, at least four of which are normally undertaken in the Curriculum Studies and Teacher Development Program, and a thesis. Additional courses may be required of some applicants, depending on previous experience and academic qualifications. Students are required to successfully complete CTL1000H, and a course in research methods from the CSTD approved research methods course list

Note: Candidates are responsible for meeting deadlines to complete their course requirements, thesis committee formation and ethical review. All requirements for the degree must be completed within six years from first enrolment for part-time enrolment and within three years of first enrollment for full-time students.

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Doctor of Education [Ed.D. (discontinued in 2005)]

Please note: Curriculum Studies and Teacher Development Program has suspended admission to the Ed.D. as of September 2005. Following the approval of a new set of Ed.D. program guidelines, the Curriculum Studies and Teacher Development Program will resume accepting applications to a reformulated Ed.D. Program.

The following description pertains to the former Ed.D. program.

The Ed.D. degree program is intended for established practitioners in positions which involve responsibility for curriculum design and implementation. A University of Toronto M.Ed. or M.A. in education or its equivalent from a recognized university, in the same area of specialization proposed at the doctoral level, completed with an average grade equivalent to a University of Toronto B+ or better is required. Further documentation may be required to establish equivalence. Ordinarily, applicants will have a minimum of three years professional experience in education prior to applying. Admission is contingent upon satisfactory completion of a Qualifying Research Paper (QRP) or a master's thesis. An applicant's admission will be confirmed, however, only when the QRP or master's thesis is judged to be of sufficiently high quality to warrant admission. (See the OISE Graduate Admissions for program requirements.)

The Ed.D. program of study normally consists of eight half-courses, at least four of which must be undertaken in the Program. Additional courses may be required of some candidates. Students are expected to take CTL1000H if they did not complete it at the master's level, and one course in research methods from the CSTD approved research methods course list. This listing is available on the Curriculum Studies and Teacher Development Program web page
(www.oise.utoronto.ca/depts/ctl/programs/curriculum.shtml). Students must successfully complete a comprehensive examination . A thesis embodying the results of an original investigation, and a final oral examination on the content and implications of the thesis are also required. The Ed.D. program of study includes a minimum of one year of fulltime study but may be initiated on a full-time or part-time basis.
NOTE: Candidates are responsible for meeting deadlines to complete their course requirements, thesis committee formations and ethical reviews. All requirements for the degree must be completed within six years from first enrolment.

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Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

The Ph.D. is intended primarily as preparation for academic positions in universities, and demands a strong commitment to curriculum research. The Curriculum Studies and Teacher Development Program offers both a full-time and a flexible-time Ph.D. program option. Applicants must declare the option(s) for which they are interested in applying. (See the OISE Graduate Admissions for other admission and program requirements.)

Ph.D. Admission Requirements

Full time Ph.D. option:
Applicants are accepted under SGS general regulations. A University of Toronto master's degree in education or its equivalent from a recognized university, in the same area of specialization as proposed at the doctoral level, completed with an average grade equivalent to a University of Toronto B+ or better is required. Further documentation may be required to establish equivalence. Applicants will ordinarily have a minimum of two years professional experience prior to applying. All applicants are required to submit, along with the application:

Their master's thesis or a sample of single-authored scholarly writing. For information on writing samples review these 'tips' on doctoral applications.
A Statement of Intent describing their reasons for wishing to take the Program, previous qualifications and professional experiences, particular research or professional interests, and future career goals.
Two academic letters of reference, or one academic and one professional letter of reference.

Flexible time Ph.D. option:
In addition to the full-time admission requirements outlined above, applicants to the flexible-time Ph.D. should demonstrate that they are active professionals engaged in activities relevant to their proposed program of study.

Ph.D. Degree Requirements:

Full-time Ph.D. students must complete their degree within six years. Flexible-time Ph.D. students must complete their degree within eight years. Degree requirements for both programs are the same. The PhD program of study normally consists of seven half courses, at least four of which are ordinarily CTL 1000-level courses undertaken in the Program.  Students are also required to complete CTL1899H, the CSTD doctoral proseminar course. Additional courses may be required of some candidates. Students are expected to take CTL1000H if they did not complete it at the master's level, and one course in research methods from an approved course listing available for download here. Students must successfully complete a comprehensive examination. In addition, a thesis embodying the results of an original investigation, and a final oral examination on the content and implications of the thesis, are also required.

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CSTD Program - Admission Requirements

Although the minimum requirement for admission to a master's program is the equivalent of a University of Toronto bachelor's degree with standing equivalent to a University of Toronto mid-B, students normally need a higher academic standing to compete effectively with the large number of applicants to be considered each year. Given the limited number of students this department may accept into the majority of its programs, not all eligible students can be admitted.

All applicants must submit:

A Statement of Purpose, which is a carefully prepared short essay telling the admissions committee why the applicant wishes to undertake a graduate program in curriculum. Refer to the applicable degree for specified issues that should be addressed. The statement is an essential part of every application; an applicant who omits it will not be considered for admission. MA and PhD applicants are asked to include in their statement the names of one or more faculty members with whom they might like to do research.

Two letters of reference:
Master's Candidates: where possible one reference should be from a university professor who knows the applicant's current scholarship and/or professional work;
Doctoral Candidates: two academic letters of reference, or one academic and one professional letter of reference.

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CSTD Program - Tips For Doctoral Applications

Writing Samples include:
Thesis OR the following examples of a scholarly writing sample:

  • major paper
  • refereed article
  • refereed conference paper
  • conference proceedings publication
  • book chapter
  • research paper

Criteria for this writing sample include the following:

  • The sample must be single-authored
  • The writing sample must demonstrate quality writing - i.e., logical, clear and well written
  • The sample must be academically rigorous
  • It must be a theoretical or empirical study
  • It must demonstrate the ability to analyze and synthesize concepts, ideas and/or data
  • The sample must contain a solid bibliography

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Course Descriptions

CSTD Courses in 2012/2013 OISE Bulletin

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