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Deepening Knowledge.

Environmental Studies

 

Documents

Indigenous Environmental Education for Cultural Survival

From the document: "Aboriginal Peoples are facing a number of serious and complex environmental issues within their territories. Post-secondary environmental education programs in Canada have been slow to adopt curriculum and develop programs to meet the needs of Aboriginal students and their communities. This manuscript outlines necessary components of successful Indigenous environmental education programs at the post-secondary level based on the author’s participation in three such programs as a program developer/director, curriculum developer and instructor, the current literature, and, in addition, her experiences as an Anishinaabe student studying Western science."

Definitions of Traditional Knowledge

by the National Aboriginal Forestry Association

From the document: "This is a compilation of various definitions of ‘traditional knowledge’ and other terms that are often used in an overlapping or interchangeable manner. The intention of this compilation is to provide an impression of the diversity of ideas surrounding the terms, as well as to provide resources for parties to reach their own conceptions of traditional knowledge and its place in the forest sector."

Traditional Ecological Knowledge

Sourced from: A Teacher’s Guide for the Video Sila Alangotok—Inuit Observations on Climate Change

From the document: "To begin working with the knowledge held by indigenous communities, it is important to first understand what this knowledge is all about and the terms used to describe it."

Aboriginal Perspectives of Sustainable Development

Reprinted from: Education for a Sustainable Future: A Resource for Curriculum Developers, Teachers, and Administrators

From the document: "Indigenous people and their communities and other local communities have a vital role in environmental management and development because of their knowledge and traditional practices. States should recognize and fully support their identity, culture and interests, and enable their effective participation in the achievement of sustainable development. (The United Nations Conference on Environment and Development 1992, 1992)."

Teaching for Ecological Sustainablity

From the document: "With a renewed focus on environmental education in the Ontario curriculum, teachers are considering which learning experiences will be most effective both in engaging students and in fostering responsible environmental citizenship. Including indigenous perspectives is one way to meet this curriculum goal."

Lesson Plans - Forests for the Future

From the document: "Curriculum materials are available for public access downloading in pdf format. We actively encourage teachers and community members to review and use these materials. Please feel free to contact us. We are able to provide advice and information to facilitate the use of these materials. We also appreciate feedback on your experiences using these materials."

Videos

Alaska Native Perspectives on Earth and Climate

From the website: "This collection looks at Alaska’s unique geology and the impact of development and climate change using both [the traditional knowledge of Native peoples and ongoing scientific research], and features Alaska Native scientists who are working toward solutions."

Great set of resources including video presentations supplemented with support materials, discussion questions, as well as related national educational standards covered through these resources.

Climate Change in Great Bear Lake

"This short documentary was produced for the Déline Renewable Resources Council in collaboration with the elders of Déline, NT. It focuses on the elders' traditional ecological knowledge of the impacts of climate change on Great Bear Lake, Canada."

Sila Alangotok - Inuit Observations on Climate Change

"This video documents the impacts of climate change from an Inuvialuit perspective. On Banks Island in Canada's High Arctic, the residents of Sachs Harbour have witnessed dramatic changes to their landscape and their way of life. Exotic insects, fish and birds have arrived; the sea ice is thnner and farther from the community, carrying with it the seals upon which the people depend for food; the permafrost is melting, causing the foundations of the community's buildings to shift and an inland lake to drain into the ocean. In the fall, storms have become frequent and severe, making boating difficult. Thunder and lightning have been seen for the first time."

Supplementary Document: Teacher's Guide

Indigenous Perspectives on the Environment

This is a series of videos from a discussion about Indigenous perspectives on the environment as part of Indigenous Sovereignty Week. This event took place at the Ottawa Public Library on October 26th, 2009. Presenters include: Daryl Sainnawap (Kitchenuhmaykoosib Inninuwug), Clayton Thomas Muller (Indigenous Environment Network), Gitz Crazy Boy (Dene and Blackfoot Nations), Marilyn Poucachiche (Barrier Lake Algonquin).

Topics include: Indigenous rights, resource extraction, traditional governance, climate justice.

 

Websites

Alaska Native Knowledge Network

From the website: "This site provides documentation related to the ways in which Native people acquire and utilize knowledge related to the ecological system in which they are situated."

Alaska Native Perspectives on Earth and Climate

From the website: "This collection looks at Alaska’s unique geology and the impact of development and climate change using both [the traditional knowledge of Native peoples and ongoing scientific research], and features Alaska Native scientists who are working toward solutions."

Great set of resources including video presentations supplemented with support materials, discussion questions, as well as related national educational standards covered through these resources.

Water: The Sacred Relationship

From the website: "For generations, the relationship between Aboriginal people and the rest of Canada has been damaged. Can water be the common ground that begins to reconcile this relationship?"

Site contains videos and curriculum resources to teach about water from Aboriginal perspectives.

Project H.O.M.E (Helping Our Mother Earth)

A mural project and tool guide for educators and students.

Academic Resources

Books - Non-Fiction

Sacred Ecology: Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Resource Management

by Fikret Berkes (1999)

Sacred Ecology"Dr Berkes approaches traditional ecological knowledge as a knowledge-practice-belief complex. This complex considers four interrelated levels: local knowledge (species specific); resource management systems (integrating local knowledge with practice); social institutions (rules and codes of behavior); and world view (religion, ethics, and broadly defined belief systems)."

 

 

Documents

The Six Faces of Traditional Ecological Knowledge

From the document: "The First Nations of Canada have been active over the past three decades in negotiating natural resources co-management arrangements that would give them greater involvement in decision-making processes that are closer to their values and worldviews... Through a review of the literature on TEK, I identified six “faces” of TEK, i.e., factual observations, management systems, past and current land uses, ethics and values, culture and identity, and cosmology, as well as the particular challenges and opportunities that each face poses to the co-management of natural resources."

Videos

Traditional Knowledge

"Mr. Wend Wendland: Interview by Dr. Shlomit Yanisky-Ravid, Director, Comparative Legal Research Center at Ono Academic College"

Websites

The Nature and Utility of Traditional Ecological Knowledge

From the website: "Increasingly, the published scientific literature and the convening of conferences and workshops reflects the growing awareness that there is a legitimate field of environmental expertise known as traditional ecological knowledge. The comprehensiveness of the taxonomic system suggests that the extent of traditional knowledge may be quite profound, and that, indeed, taxonomy is important (as in the biological sciences) as the basis for building extensive systems of knowing about nature."

Current Issues

Chemical Valley - Aamjiwnaang First Nation

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