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Deepening Knowledge.

Language Arts/English

 

Lesson Plans

My Own Blanket
(Grades K-4) Subject Strands: Language Arts, Social Studies, Visual Arts, Math.

The Tipi, The Circle Model, The Powwow: Blackfoot Nation Lesson Plan
(Grades 1-6; Level Primary/Junior) Subject Strands: Language, Social Studies.

Four Directions Learning Activity:  Cree Nation Lesson Plan
(Grades 1-6; Level Primary/Junior) Subject Strands: Language, Social Studies.

Mi'kmaq Creation Story: Mi'kmaq Nation Lesson Plan 
(Grades 1-6; Level Primary/Junior) Subject Strands: Language Arts, Drama, Social Studies, Science, Health.

Who Am I?
(Grades 4-6) Subject Strands: Language Arts, Social Studies, Visual Arts.

First Nations In The Media
(Grade 6) Subject Strands: Social Studies - Heritage and Citizenship, Language Arts - Media Literacy.

Collecting Oral History
(Any Grade) Subject Strands: Language Arts, Social Studies.

A Critical Challenge Approach to Aboriginal Art
(Any Grade) Subject Strands: Social Studies, Visual Arts, Language Arts.

Circle Traditions - Talking Circles
Grade 1; Primary. Students learn the significance of talking circles for Aboriginal people. They participate in classroom talking circles focused on curriculum-related issues or other issues relevant to them. Talking Circles, Interconnectedness, Equality, Inclusiveness.

Respect
Grade 1; Primary. Students develop an understanding of the Aboriginal belief in the importance of respecting oneself, others, and all things. Creation, Knowledge, Wisdom, Sacred objects.

Treaties
Grade 1; Primary. Students learn that promises come in different forms and that it is important to keep promises. Treaties, Agreements, Federal Government, Promises.

Responsibility
Grade 1; Primary. Students learn about how Aboriginal peoples demonstrate responsibility for themselves, others, and the environment around them. Students make connections to similar ways in which they demonstrate responsibility. Rights, Property, Shared Environment, Heritage and Citizenship.

Naming Ceremony
Grade 2; Primary. Students learn about names and naming traditions, and examine how these and other aspects of culture and community are passed on through the generations. Heritage, Traditions, Celebrations, Families, Cultures.

Seventh-Generation Stewardship
Grade 3; Primary. Students use the Aboriginal concept of seventh-generation stewardship as a framework for exploring their responsibilities for the land, animals, air, and water for future generations. Urban, Rural, Natural Environment, Water.

What Settlers Learned From Aboriginal People - Food Preservation
Grade 3; Primary. Students research how food was preserved and stored by early settlers and Aboriginal people, and share the information in a feature article for a children’s magazine. Early Settlement, Medicinal Plants, Transportation, Hunters, Gatherers, Food Preservation.

What Settlers Learned From Aboriginal People - Technology
Grade 3; Primary. Students research how food was preserved and stored by early settlers and Aboriginal people, and share the information in a feature article for a children’s magazine. Tools, Technologies, Inventions, Survival.

Comparing Media Text - Who Says?
Grade 4; Junior. Students analyse and compare two media texts, one with an Aboriginal perspective and one with a non-Aboriginal perspective.
Perceptions, Texts, Perspectives, Point of View, Audience, Influence, Message.

Aboriginal Heros
Grade 5; Junior. Students research an Aboriginal hero and write that person’s biography. Achievement, Contribution, Recognition, Non-Fiction.

Creation Stories - Where We All Come From
Grade 5; Junior. Students read and compare creation stories from various cultures. In groups, they prepare a story for a reader’s theatre presentation. Origin, Creator, Legends, Myths, Oral Tradition, Beliefs.

Stereotypes - Learning To Unlearn
Grade 5; Junior. Students learn to dispel stereotypes of Aboriginal people and use appropriate vocabulary with regard to Aboriginal people and their culture. Worldview, Perception, Fact, Stereotype, Vocabulary.

Talking Circles
Grade 5; Junior. Students discuss a work of literature, using an Aboriginal talking circle. Equality, Talking Piece, Speaker, Listener.

Aboriginal Poetry
Grade 7; Intermediate. Students examine a poem written by an Aboriginal poet and prepare and deliver an oral presentation of the poem. Sensitivity, Cultural differences, Communicate.

Gestures and Movement in Aboriginal Dance
Grade 7; Intermediate. Students interpret gestures and movements used in Aboriginal dances, verify their interpretations through research, and create a presentation to show what they have learned. Sensitivity, Cultural differences, Oral communication.

Viewpoints in Aboriginal and Mainstream Media
Grade 7; Intermediate. Students analyse and compare Aboriginal and mainstream newspapers to determine the differences in their viewpoints. Different points of view, Interests, Perspectives.

The Red River Rebellion
Grade 8; Intermediate. Students explore the roles of key individuals and groups in the Red River Rebellion and the impact of the conflict on the development of western Canada. Causes, Results, Treaty #6.

Perspectives in Aboriginal Media
Grade 8; Intermediate. Students analyse and compare the perspectives in Aboriginal media texts. Messages, Evidence, Interpretations.

Media Portrayal of Aboriginal Peoples
Grade 11; Senior. Students research the ways Aboriginal peoples have been portrayed in the mainstream media such as film and television in the past, and compare these with portrayals in the Aboriginal and mainstream media today. Perspectives, Biases, Beliefs, Values, Identity.

 

Resources

Nelson Education and Literacy: Under One Sun & Circle Of Life

Lessons and content to incorproate Indigenous perspectives into classrooms, emphasizing literacy. Online tools and resources to engage students with material through a balanced literacy approach. Each lesson includes how it can be used to activate and encourage reconciliation in and through the classroom.

Under One Sun: NEW! Under One Sun invites Kindergarten – Grade 2 students and teachers to learn about, and learn from, Aboriginal history, culture, and perspectives. The series offers contemporary Aboriginal content with extensive support for teachers. The balanced literacy approach provides rich opportunities for modelled, shared, guided and independent reading. Under One Sun offers print and digital formats.

Circle of Life: The IEC (Indigenous Education Coalition) has partnered with Nelson Education to bring you and your students the Circle of Life series, levelled books for guided and independent reading in grades 1-6. This collection of narrative and nonfiction books offers unique content that engages your students, and deepens appreciation and understanding of Indigenous cultures and traditions.

 

Oyate Criteria for Evaluating Books

The Oyate website offers a comprehensive list of criteria for evaluating literature resources for use in classrooms, both within and without an Aboriginal Education context.  This list is a companion piece to the book "How To Tell The Difference: A Guide to Evalutating Children's Books for Anti-Indian Bias", which includes a list of criteria for evaluating anti-Indian bias on the book website.

Aboriginal Literatures in Canada: A Teacher's Resource Guide

By Renate Eigenbrod, Georgina Kakegamic and Josias Fiddler, 2003.

From the resource guide's Introduction (p.2):  "Aboriginal Literatures in Canada: A Teacher’s Resource Guide serves a double purpose: to encourage the teaching of Aboriginal literature in English high school curricula across the country because Aboriginal students deserve to be taught texts they can relate to and, because non-Aboriginal students should be educated about Aboriginal culture, history and contemporary life through the richness of Aboriginal writing with its innovative uses of the English language." 

American Indians in Children's Literature (AICL)

By Debbie Reese.

From the website: "American Indians in Children's Literature (AICL) provides critical perspectives and analysis of indigenous peoples in children's and young adult books, the school curriculum, popular culture, and society. Scroll down for links to book reviews, Native media, and more..."

Using First Nations Literature in the Classroom

From the website: "This unit consists of four sections. Each section begins with a chart that summarizes the objectives that will be covered in that particular section as well as what types of activities will be used to achieve the listed objectives. Following the summary chart, you will find a description of the activity, samples of how charts (templates) are to be completed and links to any templates."  The website suggests that these lesson plans can be adapted to literature from any culture, so long as the literary resources are available.  From Saskatchewan.

Red on Red: Native American Literary Separatism

by Craig S. Womack, 1999.

Our Fire Survives the Storm: A Cherokee Literary History

by Daniel Justice, 2006.

All My Relations: An Anthology of Contemporary Canadian Native Fiction

by Thomas King, 1990.

The Exile Book of Native Canadian Fiction and Drama

by Daniel David Moses, 2011.

An Anthology of Native Canadian Literature in English

by Daniel David Moses and Terrie Goldie, 2005.

Staging Coyote's Dream: An Anthology of First Nations Drama in English

by Monique Mojica and Ric Knowles, 2003.

Staging Coyote's Dream: An Anthology of First Nations Drama in English, Vol. 2

by Monique Mojica and Richard Paul Knowles, 2009.

Living Our Language: Ojibwe Tales and Oral Histories

by Anton Truer, 2001.

Aboriginal Literature in Canada: A Teacher's Resource Guide

by Renate Eigenbrod, Georgina Kakegamic and Josias Fiddler 

Storytelling: The Art Of Knowledge

This series of lessons introduces students to traditional oral storytelling, focusing on the passing of knowledge and history.

Pursued by a Bear:  Talks, Moologues, and Tales

by Daniel David Moses, 2007.

Native Poetry in Canada: A Contemporary Anthology

by Jeanette C. Armstrong and Lalage Grauer, 2001.

IBC - Inuit Broadcasting Corporation

Video clips of IBC programs on Inuit life today.  Suitable for elementary to High School.

Inuit Legends

CDs of Inuit Legends produced by CBC North broadcasters and featuring stories such as Qallupalik - The Sea Creature and The Man from the Moon. Suitable for High School students.

Dene K'ee Gudeh

Dene K'ee Gudeh, "the Dene Language", is an app and website that aims to help people learn the Dene Zhatie language, also known as South Slavey.

Sunaunaa?

An app and educational game for learning Inuttitut, the Inuit dialect of Nunavik.

The Gift of Language and Culture

A website for Cree language education, with curriculum resources from nursery to grade 9.

The Fight to Revitalize Canada's Indigenous Languages

A 2010 article in University Affairs about endangered indigenous languages in Canada and various revitilization projects that intend to give voice to ancestral knowledge and connect children, youth, adults, and elders through cultural and linguistic programming.

Learning Anishnaabemowin

From the website: "We hope this website will serve as the official resource for the Ojibwe language creating a unique and reputable location that people throughout the world can access for learning the language, and the various dialects spoken throughout our region. This revitalization project will serve as a library of resources, including the archiving of not only our language, but also our elders through the audio and video segments throughout the site."

Mi’kmaq talking dictionary

From the website: "The talking dictionary project is developing an Internet resource for the Mi'gmaq/Mi’kmaq language. Each headword is recorded by a minimum of three speakers. Multiple speakers allow one to hear differences and variations in how a word is pronounced. Each recorded word is used in an accompanying phrase. This permits learners the opportunity to develop the difficult skill of distinguishing individual words when they are spoken in a phrase."

First Nation Literacy Blog

From the website: "We are dedicated to sharing current and interesting advancements in the area of education with all who are interested. Please Subscribe to our Blog to receive recent updates directly to your email whenever we post anything new."
 

English First Peoples - Teacher Resource Guides

From the website: "English First Peoples (EFP) is an exciting addition to the high school curriculum that offers students of all backgrounds the opportunity to explore First Peoples’ worldviews through literature, founded on the First Peoples Principles of Learning."

 

Historical Images and Maps of Mississauga

 

First Nation Literacy: Download Free Teacher's Guides

Presented by Ningwakwe Learning Press, download free student activies and teacher guides for use in your classroom. Choose from categories such as Culture & History, First Nation Issues, Literary & Reading, and more! 

Bringing Metis Children's Literature to Life

From the resource: " The mission of the Gabriel Dumont Institute (GDI) is two-fold: to promote the renewal and development of Metis culture through research, materials development, collection and distribution of those materials and the design, development and delivery of Metis-specific educational programs and services."

Legends Project: Legends of the Kwak'wala

CBC, May 18 2010. 

Legends Project: Legends of the Shuswap

CBC, January 21 2009.

Legends Project: Legends of the Old Massett Haida

CBC, February 10, 2009. 

American Indians in Children's Literature (AICL)

From the website:"Established in 2006, American Indians in Children's Literature (AICL) provides critical perspectives and analysis of indigenous peoples in children's and young adult books, the school curriculum, popular culture, and society. Scroll down for links to book reviews, Native media, and more."

Secwepemc Stories 

From the website: "The Secwepemc stories present a colourful world of animals transforming into people, of plants having human characteristics, and of the past becoming the future." 

Children's Stories 

CBC, December 6, 2016. An article suggesting three great children's books written by Indigenous authors (ages 3 and up; 4 and up; and 9-12).

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