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Additional Qualifications Online Application System

You may use this system to:

  • Apply for Additional Qualifications courses
    (Note that a valid email address and credit card are required)
  • Check the registration status of your application
  • Update your current contact information
ABOUT OISE
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    January 16
    Childhood policy expert Kerry McQuaig weighs in on east coast and cross-Canada daycare systems
    Childhood policy expert Kerry McQuaig of the Atkinson Centre for Society and Child Development at OISE discusses success of government-directed, partially funded daycare in P.E.I., as the Gallant government ponders changes to the childcare system. "Every three years we do a cross-Canada scan of where the different early-year systems are at and P.E.I. has overtaken Quebec," McQuaig said. Read more via CBC.
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    January 11
    OISE alums to receive Order of Canada for work in human rights and community engagement
    Alumni Karen Mock (MA '69, PhD '75) and Mary Pat Armstrong (MEd '82) have been appointed to the Order of Canada, Canada's highest civilian honour, for exceptional dedication and service in their communities. Congratulations to Dr. Mock and Ms. Armstrong for their outstanding work and this well deserved recognition. Read more.
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    January 09
    Prof. Charles Pascal discusses broader issue of ex-principal accused with test tampering
    The former principal accused of tampering with EQAO tests at an Ontario school could highlight a broader problem, as school leadership and staff feel pressure to perform. "Sometimes because of leadership and how the purpose of the testing is conveyed, people and individual teachers feel a pressure that they shouldn't be feeling," said professor Charles Pascal. Read more.
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    January 08
    Professor Kang Lee's research shows how children's lies are a good thing
    If you discover your child lying at age 2 or 3, you should celebrate. Research by Professor Kang Lee of the Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development has found that lying is not only normal; it's good for your brain. For parents, the findings present something of a paradox. We want our children to be clever enough to lie but morally disinclined to do so. Read more.
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    January 05
    Staff form group to learn about Indigenous history and teachings
    It was an inspiring lecture that prompted Lise Watson to start a group at OISE to learn more about Indigenous histories, cultures, traditions and teachings. Watson attended a talk by Jonathan Hamilton-Diabo, U of T's director of Indigenous Initiatives who co-chaired the university's Truth and Reconcilaiton steering committee. "He was saying, 'It's really up to non-Indigenous people to educate themselves. It's not up to us to teach you what you need to know,'" recalls Watson. "I really took that to heart."
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    January 05
    Dean Glen Jones weighs in on controversies with university boards
    In recent years, university boards have been under fire by critics on how they operate and govern - which varies widely depending on the institution. Dean Glen Jones provides his insight into best practices key to progress in our universities. Read more.
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    December 18
    Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development celebrate research projects at second annual gala
    The Department of Applied Psychology & Human Development (APHD) hosted the second annual Research Gala this Monday, December 11. The event, aimed at showcasing the active research occurring in the department, was attended by members of the OISE community including students, faculty and staff members, and OISE Dean Glen Jones. OISE's 12th floor was transformed into a research gallery, decorated with academic posters and interactive stations from APHD faculty and their labs. Read more.
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    December 13
    The prohibitive expense of math tutoring services is widening the achievement gap, says Professor Mary Reid
    Math tutoring services are becoming more popular as public schools struggle with poor math scores. The cost of these services, however, are prohibitively expensive for many families says Professor Mary Reid. "We're creating that divide between the haves and have nots and the achievement gap is widening because of that," she warns. Read more .
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    December 12
    Dr. Cecilia Morgan's new book explores remarkable history of Indigenous voyages from early Canada
    Professor Cecilia Morgan's new book entitled "Travellers Through Empire: Indigenous Voyages from Early Canada" provides surprising vantage points on First Nations travels between 1770 - 1914. Chronicling the emotional ties, contexts, and desires for agency, resistance, and negotiation that determined their diverse experiences, the book weaves together a fascinating account of Indigenous peoples in the heart of the British Empire. Read more.
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    December 11
    Professor Monica Heller awarded honorary doctorate by University of Bern
    Congratulations to OISE professor Monica Heller, who was recently awarded an honorary doctorate by the University of Bern, Switzerland. Professor Heller is internationally renowned for her research on the role of language in the construction of social difference and social inequality, especially francophone Canada, and comparative work in Western Europe. Read more.
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    December 05
    Professor Kathleen Gallagher brings the 'radical hopes' of youth to the stage
    This weekend, Professor Kathleen Gallagher brings the radical hopes of youth to the stage. Her new play, "Towards Youth" brings together the voices of youth and teachers from around the world and asks: "As democracies thin out everywhere, how are our young people faring, and how are they teaching us a better way forward?" It premieres this weekend at Crow's Theatre in Toronto. It's free, but tickets are required. Get yours today.
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    December 04
    Dr. Eve Tuck named Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Methodologies with Youth and Communities
    In Canada and around the world, committing truth and reconciliation with regard to how settler societies have abused and disrespected Indigenous communities, requires community-led research approaches that reflect Indigenous ways of knowing and acting. In her recently announced position as Canada Research Chair in Indigenous Methodologies with Youth and Communities, OISE Professor Eve Tuck will provide significant leadership at this important time. Read more.
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    December 01
    Should the TDSB phase out specialty programs? Prof. Esther Geva comments.
    Should the Toronto public schools phase out specialty programs? Prof. Esther Geva weighs in on the trend towards integrating learners: "You don't want to put kids into boxes, you want them to learn from each other." Read more via Globe and Mail.
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    November 27
    Trustees have voted to end police officers serving in Toronto public schools. Alum Gita Rao Madan discusses next steps.
    In 2008, the Toronto District School Board and Toronto Police Service agreed to place police officers in select high schools around the city. The result was a program where some Black and Brown students said they felt targeted, harassed and intimidated, and where some undocumented students reportedly feared for their safety. OISE graduate Gita Rao Madan discusses next steps now that the program is over.
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    November 27
    Professor Bonnie Burstow argues against the use of electroconvulsive therapy on CTV News
    Professor Bonnie Burstow disputes the safety and effectiveness of electroconvulsive therapy on CTV News. Watch.
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    November 23
    Drs. Carol Campbell and Michael Fullan co-author discussion paper for Ontario's student assessment review
    The independent review of Ontario's educational assessment and reporting practices is now underway. Check out this new discussion paper co-authored by Professors Carol Campbell and Michael Fullan, Education Advisors to the Premier and Minister of Education. Read more.
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    November 22
    Is unabashed embrace of free speech the best option for universities? That's oversimplifying the problem, says Professor Creso Sá
    On-going controversies around free speech on campus have sparked much commentary recently. Aside from the customary assortment of op-eds on the issue from both insiders and outsiders to academia, the Globe and Mail felt urged to publish an editorial with the self-explanatory title: Why an unabashed embrace of free speech is the best option for our universities. That is a facile conclusion for two main reasons. Read more.
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    November 17
    Charles Pascal comments on the issue of academic freedom in ongoing Ontario college strike
    It doesn't come with a dollar figure attached, and is something striking college teachers argue is in the best interests of all students. But what do placards demanding "Academic freedom now!" actually mean, and why has the principle been a major stumbling block since faculty at the province's 24 colleges went on strike five weeks ago? Dr. Charles Pascal weighs in. Read more via Toronto Star.
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    November 13
    Doctoral student Edmund Adam writes opinion piece on the dangers of group-think on university campuses
    This past August, a group of professors from Harvard, Princeton and Yale universities published a statement advising students in the U.S. to keep an open mind and reject "the vice of conformism." When Edmund Adams first read this statement, he hoped it would rekindle debates on free speech and the mission of universities and colleges as institutions of democracy, and how they should respond in a period of unsettled times for higher education and the broader society supporting it. Read more via University Affairs.
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    October 31
    College strikes has echoes of the past: Toronto Star op-ed by Dr. Charles Pascal
    Dr. Charles Pascal was a college president in 1984 when faculty voted overwhelmingly for a strike because they felt they were treated as lemmings, victims of top-down management styles that eschewed proper faculty involvement in decision-making. In this new op-ed, Dr. Pascal weighs in on the current college strike. Read more via Toronto Star.
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    October 25
    Recent immigrant parents in Canada at greater risk of mental health issues; kids more likely to suffer learning setbacks, OISE studies find
    Canadian immigrant parents, refugees, women and minorities are at greater risk of mental health issues and socioeconomic challenges, with their children more likely to suffer learning setbacks before kindergarten, a pair of studies by researchers at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education at the University of Toronto have shown. Read more.
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    October 24
    TDSB is right to reconsider specialty programs that leave too many behind, writes Prof. Rubén Gaztambide-Fernández
    In an op-ed to the Toronto Star, Professor Rubén Gaztambide-Fernández writes, "A school board as diverse as the TDSB cannot continue to support programs that disproportionately advantage a small and already privileged segment of the population." Read more.
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    October 24
    Prof. Roy Gillis elected to the CPA International Union of Psychological Science
    Congratulations to Professor Roy Gillis, who's been elected for a 4-year term on the Canadian Psychological Association International Union of Psychological Science.
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    October 24
    OISE study looks at effects of domestic violence on workplaces - by asking the abusers
    A new study from OISE and Western University finds that domestic violence perpetration extends into the workplace, and has negative safety and productivity costs. Yet, most employers lack the resources to help perpetrators. Read more.
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    October 13
    OISE's Robertson Program responds to TRC with Indigenous math education conference
    OISE's Robertson Program co-hosted a unique conference on Indigenous Knowledge and Mathematics Education in response to the TRC. Educators gathered in Treaty #3 to improve mathematics teaching within a framework of reconciliation and reciprocal learning. The conference aimed to celebrate and highlight the important work being done by educators in Northern Ontario to improve student learning, including those students that come from First Nation Communities. Read more.
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    October 12
    Fighting anti-black racism: Teaching kids to identify individual black people can reduce racial bias
    Many times, those who hold racially biased views of other people see them as all the same. Instead of thinking of them as specific individuals, they lump them into a group - seeing them as "those people." Now a global team of researchers, including OISE's Dr. Kang Lee and PhD candidate Miao K. Qian, suggests one way to reduce racial bias in kids is by teaching them to identify individual faces of those of other races. The study, published on Oct. 12 in the journal Child Development, is the first to show a lasting effect in reducing racial bias - and in kids young enough to not be too set in their ways. Read more.
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    October 11
    CREFO - OISE's Centre for Franco-Ontarian Studies - wins prestigious award
    Recently, OISE's Centre de recherches en éducation franco-ontarienne (CREFO) won the Prix du 3-juillet-1608, a prestigious award given by the Conseil supérieur de la langue française du Québec (CSLF)*. Each year, this event recognizes an organization that has distinguished itself through exemplary efforts to defend and promote French language and culture in North America, while also providing exceptional services to a specific French language collectivity as well as to the entire North American francophone community. This award is significant for CREFO members since it acknowledges the excellence of their work across Canada.
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    October 04
    Doctoral student Asima Vezina announced as Algoma University's new president and vice-chancellor
    Asima Vezina, longtime educator, will take over as Algoma University's new president and vice-chancellor later this month. Congratulations! Read more via Soo Today.
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    October 04
    OISE ranked 11th best educational institute in the world by Times Higher Education
    The 2018 Time Higher Education World University Rankings by Subject has placed the University of Toronto 11th in the world for education. Read more.
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    October 04
    What's HIBAR research and why do we need more of it? Professor Creso Sá explains.
    Can cooperative research known as Highly Integrative Basic and Responsive (HIBAR) research help us transform science and society? Co-author professor Creso Sá argues more academics should embrace cooperative research to address societal problems. Find out why in The Conversation.
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    September 29
    Professor George Dei honoured by U of T's African Alumni Association
    Professor George Dei has been recognized as a community influencer by the U of T African Alumni Association for his tireless work to ensure inclusion and empowerment in schools. Dr. Dei is a mentor to young scholars at OISE, and he is a strong proponent of African-focused schools in Toronto. Read more.
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    September 29
    Orange Shirt Day: OISE and U of T show support for residential school survivors
    A small sea of people wearing orange shirts gathered at OISE Friday as part of a national campaign to commemorate residential school survivors. "Our objective is for people to understand the true history of residential school survivors in Canada," said Jennifer Sylvester, an event organizer and first-year master's student at OISE. Read more via U of T News.
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    September 28
    Megan Boler and Elizabeth Davis discuss the role of emotion research in contemporary politics
    In a new op-ed for the Toronto Star, professor Megan Boler and doctoral student Elizabeth Davis looks at the role of emotion and emotion research in contemporary politics. They conclude that scholars need to catch up with the more nefarious uses of emotion research. Read more via Toronto Star.
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    September 25
    Nova Scotia gets tough on students with strict school absenteeism policy
    School absenteeism has become a problem in Nova Scotia, prompting a tougher policy brought in by the ruling Liberal government. Professor Charles Pascal believes the problem of student absenteeism comes down to the root of the question: Why are you not coming to school? Pascal explains we should take a closer look at the schools and the relationship with parents. Listen on CBC's The Current.
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    September 21
    How I am learning to include Indigenous knowledge in the classroom
    There is a new duty felt by teachers at all levels of our education system to address the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) Calls to Action. For professor Kathleen Gallagher, she knew she had to make the process of understanding past truths and reconciliation a personal journey. In The Conversation, Dr. Gallagher describes her journey with Indigenous education - a humble path to a better Canada. Read more.
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    September 19
    Should we get rid of standardized testing?
    The results of standardized testing can help us understand some things, but they can also be misleading. If not designed properly, standardized tests can mislead students - for instance through confusing and unfamiliar cultural references. So what do these tests actually measure? And are they worthwhile? MT professor Arlo Kempf investigates. Watch at TED-Ed.
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    September 15
    Congratulations to SSHRC Impact Award finalist Dr. Jack Quarter
    Professor Jack Quarter is finalist of the prestigious SSHRC Impact Award which honours the highest achievements in Canada in research, research training, knowledge mobilization and outreach activities in the humanities and social sciences. Dr. Quarter is recognized as a champion of community partnership research on Canada's social economy. Congratulations Dr. Quarter!
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    September 12
    Kids praised for being smart are more likely to cheat, according to new research from Dr. Kang Lee and team
    If kids do well in a game or a task, parents and caregivers often praise them so they feel good about themselves. But, according to two new studies from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and co-authors in the U.S. and China - that praise can backfire in a big way. Kids who are praised for "being smart", or who are told they "have a reputation for being smart", are more likely to cheat, research has found. Read more.
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    September 08
    9 ways to create an inclusive classroom: Tips from OISE's experts
    OISE Professor Ann Lopez, winner of numerous multicultural education awards and distinctions, and Richard Messina, Principal of OISE's Dr. Eric Jackman Institute of Child Study (JICS) give 9 tips for teachers on how to create an environment that celebrates equality in an increasingly diverse world.
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    September 07
    Professor George Dei elected Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada
    Considered one of Canada's foremost scholars on race and anti-racism studies, Dr. George Dei has spent his academic life instilling more equity and social justice in the education system.
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    September 06
    Back to school: Top tips from OISE Dean, advice for students, teachers, parents
    Looking to start your school year off on the right foot? OISE Dean Glen Jones has two important tips that will help ensure your success. Pluscheck out helpful tips for teachers, students and parents from OISE's education experts.
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    August 31
    Trump tornado must not blow Canadian reconciliation off course, says Dean Glen Jones
    Media emphasis on the recent events in Charlottesville, Va., and Trump's igniting responses, risks diminishing the attention given to dealing with Canada's own racist colonial history, says Dean Glen Jones. Universities should not lose sight of the importance of the domestic reconciliation project and the need to address our own complex, multifaceted narrative of colonialism and racism, says Jones. Read more.
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    August 28
    OISE's Normand Labrie and Yollande Dweme Mbukuny Pitta helps plan Ontario's first French-language university
    Ontario is proposing to create a new French-language university, the first of its kind in the province, giving French-speaking students more opportunities to study in French. In consultation with the francophone community, the French-language University Planning Board has provided recommendations to the government for the creation of a French-language university in Central and Southwestern Ontario, governed by and for Francophones. Read more.
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    August 25
    Professors Carol Campbell and Michael Fullan re-appointed as education advisors to the Ontario Premier and Minister of Education
    The Government of Ontario has re-appointed OISE professors Carol Campbell and Michael Fullan as education advisors to the Ontario Premier and Minister of Education. They are recognized internationally for their research and leadership in public education. Congratulations!