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Consecutive Bachelor of Education & Technological Education Teacher Candidates

Newly Admitted Teacher Candidates
 

PROGRAM / COURSE DESCRIPTIONS

In this section:

Program Overview
Primary/Junior Program
Junior/Intermediate Program
Intermediate/Senior/Technological Education Program
Core Courses & Internship Descriptions 

 

Program Overview

The Bachelor of Education or Diploma in Technological Education and Ontario Teachers' Certificate of Qualification programs are offered in the following areas of specialization:

Elementary
(Practicum Placements for teacher candidates in the Primary/Junior and Junior/Intermediate programs will be in Elementary Schools)

Secondary
(Practicum Placements for teacher candidates in the Intermediate/Senior and Technological Education programs will be in Secondary Schools)

All programs consist of 7 components (listed below), for a total course weight of 5.0.  The following sections present the programs, course choices if applicable and course descriptions.  Candidates should read the section applicable to their program/area of specialization and refer to the course descriptions for course content, prerequisites, restrictions and the number of required hours in each course. Teacher candidates must successfully complete all 7 components of the program as outlined in the Calendar in order to be recommended for the Bachelor of Education degree or the Diploma in Technological Education and the Ontario Teachers' Certificate of Qualification.


PROGRAM COMPONENTS

  1. Curriculum and Instruction  (2.0 course weights)
  2. Teacher Education Seminar  (1.0 course weight)
  3. Psychological Foundations of Learning and Development  (0.5 course weight)
  4. School and Society  (0.5 course weight)
  5. Related Studies Course  (0.5 course weight)
  6. Practicum  (0.5 course weight)
  7. Internship  (0.0 course weight)

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The Primary Junior Program (P/J)


Our elementary program graduated over 500 teacher candidates last year. In order to make the program student-friendly and effective, we place teacher candidates into groupings called Options. The goal for each Option is to deliver a coherent and engaging program. The Option structure allows candidates to get to know their faculty team, be part of a learning community, and become well acquainted with a small group of teacher candidates. Most courses are taken with your Option classmates. The Option faculty team instructs candidates, advises candidates, supports them in the practica, responds to concerns, and helps candidates capitalize on their professional program experiences.

Make your Option selections NO LATER THAN THE EXPIRY OF OFFER DEADLINE INDICATED ON YOUR OFFER OF ADMISSION LETTER, as confirmation that you plan to register.

Information night will be April 9th to help you make your decisions. Note: If your offer arrives after the Information Meeting date, please contact the Option Coordinators directly if you need further information (contact information is on each individual option description page).

Option Selection and Candidate Information Webpage

Please note that Teacher candidates in the Elementary program may be allowed to have a French immersion placement as one of their practicum placements only if they:

  • successfully pass the French Proficiency Test and
  • are enrolled in the Related Studies course Teaching in French Immersion EDU5552 and
  • have satisfied SUPO that their level of French is sufficient to underake the placement (SUPO will consult with the instructor of EDU5552 - Teaching in French Immersion). 


    NOTE: Successful completion of a French Language Proficiency test is required for entry into this course. Those intending to take this course must register for and pass the proficiency test. More at: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/Teacher_Candidates/Newly_Admitted_Teacher_Candidates/Related_Studies_Course_Info.html#EDU5552H

 NOTE: Elementary Candidates who complete a French practicum will not be certified in French, nor will they be granted the FSL – Part 1 Qualification.  

Want to learn More about teaching French in Ontario?
A PDF OCT memo outlining Qualifications required for teaching in French can be found on the Ontario College of Teachers website.
 

 

Below are the components/courses required for the Primary/Junior program.  For more detailed descriptions of the courses refer to the course descriptions at the end of this site.

A.  CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION
The Primary/Junior Education course (EDU1420) is required of all Primary/Junior teacher candidates and consists of broad-based methodology in seven subject areas.  

B.  TEACHER EDUCATION SEMINAR
The Teacher Education Seminar course (EDU6000) is required of all teacher candidates and links the candidate's experiences across the program, emphasizes professional growth and provides specialized components for elementary candidates.  

C.  PSYCHOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT
The Psychological Foundations of Learning and Development course (EDU3506) is required of all teacher candidates and focuses on psychological principles of learning and development, key concepts such as intelligence and motivation, diversity among learners and interrelations among the learner, the family, the school, and society in relation to learning.  

D.  SCHOOL AND SOCIETY
The School and Society course (EDU3508) is required of all teacher candidates and emphasizes relationships among schools, classrooms, community and society; the diversity of classrooms; teachers' professional work; educational policy and the purposes of education.

E.  RELATED STUDIES
The elective Related Studies courses allow teacher candidates to pursue individual interests and deepen or broaden their knowledge and skills. One course with a weight of 0.5 is required. You will select your Related studies course on-line using the Student Web Service/ROSI in mid-august. Click here for potential course offerings and descriptions.
  
F.  PRACTICUM
The Practicum (EDU4010) is required of all teacher candidates and consists of two main components: (i) orientation to schools, with a focus on school culture and school community; and (ii) classroom practice.  Teacher candidates are assigned, during fall and winter Practicum sessions, to schools or other settings that have been approved by the Ontario College of Teachers. All students are required to have a satisfactory Vulnerable Sector Report upon entering the practicum component of the program.  Please review the School Board Requirements for Police Record Checks.
As you are expected to be at your assigned Practicum location for each day of the Practicum, you must ensure that you are free of any other time commitments during these periods.

While in the schools or other settings, you will have opportunities to observe and teach, possibly attend staff and departmental meetings, carry out supervisory duties and/or assist with administrative tasks, support extra-curricular activities in which you have a special interest and otherwise become acquainted with the full range of teachers' professional responsibilities.

The School-University Partnerships Office (SUPO) supervises assignments and evaluation procedures.  During the registration period, there are briefing sessions for all candidates.

You should be aware that Practicum placements are made by SUPO. Under no circumstances should candidates make their own arrangements with schools.  Practicum assignments will be made in the jurisdictions with which OISE has made partnership arrangements according to the option in which you are placed.  Details will be provided at the Elementary Option Information Night. (See the Elementary Option Selection Guide for details.)
 
We make every attempt to place teacher candidates close to their homes, however, due to circumstances beyond our control, you may be required to travel up to 1.5 hours to and from your Practicum school.

G.  INTERNSHIP
The Internship is the culminating field-based experience and is required of all teacher candidates. It allows candidates to deepen and broaden their skills and knowledge in terms of the Ontario College of Teachers' Standards of Practice for the teaching profession.

All questions about the Practicum or Internship should be directed to your Option Coordinator or the School-University Partnerships Office - Room 8-225, 252 Bloor Street West; Telephone 416-978-2202

 
ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 'STEP' PROGRAM
The Student Teaching Experience Program (STEP) is a compulsory part of the Primary/Junior and Junior/Intermediate programs.  STEP provides opportunities to observe and work with associate teachers during weeks that are not part of the Practicum or Internship sessions.  Depending on the option in which they are enrolled, candidates have different days or blocks of STEP.  STEP days are forerunners to the Practicum sessions in that candidates are in a classroom for a series of STEP days preceding a Practicum session in the same classroom.

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The Junior/Intermediate Program (J/I)

Our elementary program graduates over 500 teacher candidates every year. In order to make the program student-friendly and effective, we place teacher candidates into groupings called Options. The goal for each Option is to deliver a coherent and engaging program. The Option structure allows candidates to get to know their faculty team, be part of a learning community, and become well acquainted with a small group of teacher candidates. Most courses are taken with Option classmates. The Option faculty team instructs candidates, advises candidates, supports them in the practica, responds to concerns, and helps candidates capitalize on their professional program experiences.

Please refer to the course descriptions for course content, prerequisites, co-requisites, restrictions and the number of hours required for each of the mandated courses within your program. 

Make your selections NO LATER THAN THE EXPIRY OF OFFER DEADLINE INDICATED ON YOUR OFFER OF ADMISSION LETTER, as confirmation that you plan to register.

Information night will be April 9th to help you make your decisions. Note: If your offer arrives after the Information Meeting date, please contact the Option Coordinators directly if you need further information (contact information is on each individual option description page).

Please note that Teacher candidates in the Elementary program may be allowed to have a French immersion placement as one of their practicum placements only if they:

(the below does not apply to those whose J/I teachable subject is French)

  • successfully pass the French Proficiency Test and
  • are enrolled in the Related Studies course Teaching in French Immersion EDU5552 and
  • have satisfied SUPO that their level of French is sufficient to underake the placement (SUPO will consult with the instructor of EDU5552 - Teaching in French Immersion). 


    NOTE: Successful completion of a French Language Proficiency test is required for entry into this course. Those intending to take this course must register for and pass the proficiency test.  More at: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/Teacher_Candidates/Newly_Admitted_Teacher_Candidates/Related_Studies_Course_Info.html#EDU5552H

 NOTE: Elementary Candidates who complete a French practicum will not be certified in French, nor will they be granted the FSL – Part 1 Qualification.  

 ► Option Selection and Candidate Information Webpage.

Below are the components/courses required for the Junior/Intermediate program.  For more detailed descriptions of the courses click on the underlined courses or refer to the course descriptions at the end of this site.


A.  CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION
The Junior/Intermediate Education course (EDU1450) is required of all J/I teacher candidates and consists of broad based methodology in seven subject areas.

As well, all Junior/Intermediate candidates must take one subject based Intermediate Curriculum and Instruction course.  You have already selected this course when you submitted your application to the Ontario Universities Application Centre for teacher education.

The list of Intermediate Curriculum and Instruction courses is as follows.

Course    Course
Number        Title    

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B.  TEACHER EDUCATION SEMINAR
The Teacher Education Seminar course (EDU6000) is required of all teacher candidates and links the candidate's experiences across the program, emphasizes professional growth and provides specialized components for elementary candidates. 

C.  PSYCHOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT
The Psychological Foundations of Learning and Development course (EDU3506) is required of all teacher candidates and focuses on psychological principles of learning and development, key concepts such as intelligence and motivation, diversity among learners and interrelations among the learner, the family, the school, and society in relation to learning.

D.  SCHOOL AND SOCIETY
The School and Society course (EDU3508) is required of all teacher candidates and emphasizes relationships among schools, classrooms, community and society; the diversity of classrooms; teachers' professional work; educational policy and the purposes of education.

E.  RELATED STUDIES
The elective Related Studies courses allow teacher candidates to pursue individual interests and deepen or broaden their knowledge and skills. One course with a weight of 0.5 is required. You will select your Related studies course August 20th (starting at 6 AM)  on-line using the Student Web Service/ROSI. Click here for potential course offerings and descriptions.
 

F.  PRACTICUM
The Practicum (EDU4010) is required of all teacher candidates and consists of two main components: (i) orientation to schools, with a focus on school culture and school community; and (ii) classroom practice.  Teacher candidates are assigned, during fall and winter Practicum sessions, to schools or other settings that have been approved by the Ontario College of Teachers. Please review the School Board Requirements for Police Record Checks information included in the offer of admission package.

As you are expected to be at your assigned Practicum location for each day of the Practicum, you must ensure that you are free of any other time commitments during these periods.

While in the schools or other settings, you will have opportunities to observe and teach, possibly attend staff and departmental meetings, carry out supervisory duties and/or assist with administrative tasks, support extra-curricular activities in which you have a special interest and otherwise become acquainted with the full range of teachers' professional responsibilities.

Assignments and evaluation procedures are supervised by the School-University Partnerships Office (SUPO).  During the registration period, there are briefing sessions for all candidates.  

You should be aware that Practicum placements are made by SUPO. Under no circumstances should candidates make their own arrangements with schools.  Practicum assignments will be made in the jurisdictions with which OISE has made partnership arrangements according to the option in which you are placed.  Details will be provided at the Elementary Option Information Night.

We make every attempt to place teacher candidates close to their homes, however, due to circumstances beyond our control, you may be required to travel up to 1.5 hours to and from your Practicum school.
 
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G.  INTERNSHIP
The Internship is the culminating field-based experience and is required of all teacher candidates. It allows candidates to deepen and broaden their skills and knowledge in terms of the Ontario College of Teachers' Standards of Practice for the teaching profession.

All questions about the Practicum or Internship should be directed to your Option coordinator or the School-University Partnerships Office - Room 8-225, 252 Bloor Street West; Telephone 416-978-2202.

ELEMENTARY EDUCATION 'STEP' PROGRAM
The Student Teaching Experience Program (STEP) is a compulsory part of the Primary/Junior and Junior/Intermediate programs.  STEP provides opportunities to observe and work with associate teachers during weeks that are not part of the Practicum or Internship sessions.  Depending on the option in which they are enrolled, candidates have different days or blocks of STEP.  STEP days are forerunners to the Practicum sessions in that candidates are in a classroom for a series of STEP days preceding a Practicum session in the same classroom.

The Intermediate/Senior and Technological Education Program

Secondary candidates take three of their courses in foundational cohort groupings (Teacher Education Seminar, Psychological Foundations of Learning and Development, and School and Society) which have specific themes or a regional focus (referred to as Secondary Program cohorts (SPs). SP cohorts normally have a coordinator(s) and operate in groups of approximately 30-35, 60, or 90.  SP cohorts normally work with partnering schools and/or school departments. In most cases, teacher candidates move outside of their SP cohort for their Curriculum and Instruction and Related Studies courses. 
Review the Secondary Program Information and Candidate Information website for more information and click on the Course Selection Form button when you are ready to submit your preferences of cohort. The link to this website can be found on the checklist page.

Please refer to the course description section for course content, prerequisites, restrictions and the number of hours required for each course. Ensure that you abide by any course restrictions or specific entry requirements.

For additional information you may also wish to attend the  Program information meeting, which will be held April 9th. Meeting details found at: http://www.oise.utoronto.ca/ite/BEd_DipTechEd/BEd_Secondary/Current_Cohort_Descriptions/
 
Note: If your offer arrives after the Information Meeting date, please contact Secondary Cohort Coordinators directly if you need further information (contact information is on each individual cohort description page).
 
This section explains the components/courses required for the Intermediate/Senior/Technological Education program.


A.  CURRICULUM AND INSTRUCTION
Two Intermediate/Senior Curriculum and Instruction courses are required of all I/S teacher candidates.  These courses are subject-specific for Intermediate/Senior candidates.  You have already selected these courses when you submitted your application to the Ontario Universities Application Centre for teacher education. They will automatically be printed on your individual timetable, which you will receive during registration in September.

NOTE: Teacher candidates in Music may enroll in only one of Music - Instrumental or Music - Vocal.

The list of Intermediate/Senior Curriculum and Instruction courses is as follows. (Click on the title to go to the course description)

Course          Course
Number          Title 
EDU1340   
Business Studies - Accounting
EDU1330    Business Studies - General
EDU1040    Computer Studies
EDU1070    Dramatic Arts
EDU1080    Economics
EDU1100    English
EDU1160    Family Studies
EDU1110    French as a Second Language   
EDU1440    Geography
EDU1250    Health and Physical Education
EDU1150    History
EDU1140    International Languages - German 
EDU1190    International Languages - Italian
EDU1310    International Languages - Spanish
EDU1220    Mathematics
EDU1230    Music - Instrumental
EDU1240    Music - Vocal
EDU1430    Philosophy
EDU1260    Politics
EDU1280    Religious Education
EDU1470    Science - Biology
EDU1480    Science - Chemistry
EDU1300    Science - General
EDU1490    Science - Physics
EDU1270    Social Sciences - General 
EDU1010    Visual Arts

Technological Studies     Note: both C&I courses listed below must be taken
ETS1010   
Principles and Methods of Teaching Technological Studies
ETS1040   Curriculum Development for Technological Studies

B.  TEACHER EDUCATION SEMINAR
The Teacher Education Seminar course (EDU6000) is required of all teacher candidates and links the candidate's experiences across the program, emphasizes professional growth and provides specialized components for secondary candidates.  


C.  PSYCHOLOGICAL FOUNDATIONS OF LEARNING AND DEVELOPMENT
The Psychological Foundations of Learning and Development course (EDU3506) is required of all teacher candidates and focuses on psychological principles of learning and development, key concepts like intelligence and motivation, diversity among learners and interrelations among the learner, the family, the school, and society in relation to learning.  

D.  SCHOOL AND SOCIETY
The School and Society course (EDU3508) is required of all teacher candidates and emphasizes relationships among schools, classrooms, community and society; the diversity of classrooms; teachers' professional work; educational policy and the purposes of education.
 
E.  RELATED STUDIES
The elective Related Studies courses allow teacher candidates to pursue individual interests and deepen or broaden their knowledge and skills. One course with a weight of 0.5 is required. You will select your Related studies course on-line using the Student Web Service/ROSI in mid-august. Click here for potential course offerings and descriptions.

F.  PRACTICUM
The Practicum (EDU4010) is required of all teacher candidates and consists of two main components: (i) orientation to schools, with a focus on school culture and school community; and (ii) classroom practice.  Teacher candidates are assigned, during fall and winter Practicum sessions, to schools or other settings approved by the Ontario College of Teachers.

As you are expected to be at your assigned Practicum location for each day of the Practicum, you must ensure that you are free of any other time commitments during these periods. Excessive work schedules sometimes prevent teacher candidates from contributing fully to the Practicum, especially with respect to extra-curricular programs.  Please review the School Board Requirements for Police Record Checks information. 

While in the schools or other settings, you will have opportunities to observe and teach, possibly attend staff and departmental meetings, carry out supervisory duties and/or assist with administrative tasks, support extra-curricular activities in which you have a special interest and otherwise become acquainted with the full range of teachers' professional responsibilities.

Assignments and evaluation procedures are supervised by the School-University Partnerships Office (SUPO).  During the registration period, there will be briefing sessions for all candidates.  You should be aware that all Practicum placements are made by SUPO.  Under no circumstances should candidates make their own arrangements with schools. We make every attempt to place teacher candidates close to their homes, however, due to circumstances beyond our control, you may be required to travel up to 1.5 hours to and from your Practicum school.

Placements will be made in the following boards in partnership with OISE and only in schools designated for OISE.
  • Dufferin-Peel Catholic District School Board
  • Durham District School Board
  • Durham Catholic District School Board
  • Halton District School Board
  • Halton Catholic District School Board
  • Hamilton-Wentworth District School Board
  • Hamilton-Wentworth Catholic District School Board
  • Peel District School Board
  • Simcoe County District School Board
  • Simcoe Muskoka Catholic School Board
  • Toronto District School Board
  • Toronto Catholic District School Board
  • York Region District School Board
  • York Catholic District School Board

G.  INTERNSHIP
The Internship is the culminating field-based experience and is required of all teacher candidates. It allows candidates to deepen and broaden their skills and knowledge in terms of the Ontario College of Teachers' Standards of Practice for the teaching profession.

All questions about the Practicum or Internship should be directed to your coordinator or the School-University Partnerships Office (SUPO).  Telephone 416-978-2202

Click for a list of the Related Studies Courses that are proposed for 2014-15 as well as enrollment information. You are required to take one of these courses as part of your program.  We regret that students are not allowed to take more than one of these.


Core Courses & Internship Descriptions (excluding related studies courses)

(LISTED IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER BY COURSE TITLE)

NOTE: COURSE WEIGHTS/HOURS
• one full course (1.0) equivalent to 72 contact hours
• one half course (0.5) equivalent to 36 contact hours

BUSINESS STUDIES  Intermediate/Senior


Business Studies- Accounting  EDU1340     (Course Weight 1.0)
This course focuses on evidence-based curriculum development, planning, and implementation in Accounting courses in Grades 11 and 12. The establishment and maintenance of an effective learning environment will be emphasized. Innovative instructional techniques and assessment and evaluation of student performance in Accounting will be explored. Other topics addressed include the use of technology in Accounting, selection and creation of resources for use in Accounting courses, and current issues and directions in the field of Accounting.
Prerequisites:  Three full university courses in Business subjects, with a minimum of one full course in Accounting.  Consideration will be given to equivalent field experience and related post-secondary education.


Business Studies - General EDU1330 (Course Weight 1.0)
This course is designed to prepare teachers of Business in Grades 9-12. It focuses on evidence-based curriculum development, planning, and implementation for a range of Business Courses. Innovative instructional techniques and assessment approaches for teaching a variety of Business Studies curricula at all secondary grade levels will be examined. Other topics addressed include the use of technology, selection and creation of resources for business courses, and current issues and directions in business education.
Prerequisites:  Three full university courses in Business subjects.  Consideration will be given to equivalent field experience and related post-secondary education.
 
 

Computer Studies  Intermediate/Senior  EDU1040 (Course Weight 1.0)
This course focuses on discourses in education and culture around computers and technology, in which teachers produce curricula and spaces where diverse student populations can engage in the production of computing knowledge.  Knowledge of computing is built by students, teachers, communities, cultures, and globally through relationships and everyday and social/cultural experiences.  Preservice teachers, in taking up multiple orientations and pedagogical approaches to the teaching of computers, will explore issues around computer use in secondary schools - e.g. privacy, pornography, relationships, and censorship in cyberspace, conceptual/imaginative interpretations and limitations in computerized environments, and problem-oriented and case study approaches to computing.  Facilities are provided for hands-on experience with computers.
Prerequisites:    Three full post-secondary courses in computing, or approved field experience.


Curriculum Development for Technological Studies  ETS1040 (Course Weight 1.0)
This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of curriculum development for Broad-Based Technology programs in secondary schools.  The course uses a constructivist approach to promote integrated learning and broad-based technology approaches through activities that lead to the development of unit plans, a course of study, a project outline, a student learning module and a course portfolio. Thematic and project-based strategies are used to address the learning expectations outlined in curriculum guidelines and policy documents and provide a variety of student learning styles, teaching approaches, and assessment and evaluation strategies.  Shop safety and workplace safety are themes infused throughout the course. 


Dramatic Arts Intermediate EDU1071 (Course Weight .5)
Drama as a means of personal development and as a learning technique. The philosophy and practice of drama in education; the possibilities for conceptual development and expansion of the imagination through the art of drama; the exploration of sensory awareness, movement improvisation, speech, and oral interpretation.

Dramatic Arts  Intermediate/Senior  EDU1070 (Course Weight 1.0)
This course focuses on the philosophy and practice of drama in education with a particular focus on the cognitive, social, and artistic development of the older child and adolescent through both curricular and extracurricular programs.  Teaching techniques introduce students to the use of movement and voice, as well as developing an awareness of and practice in drama as an art form.  Activities are wide-ranging in their approaches to improvisation, textual analysis, interpretation, scripting.  Students will plan individual lessons and units as well as consider the purpose and design of a variety of assessment methods.
Prerequisites:    Three full university courses in Drama, or approved field experience.

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Economics  Intermediate/Senior  EDU1080 (Course Weight 1.0)
This course introduces candidates to the methodologies and issues relevant to teachers of economics in Ontario.  Instructional strategies, assessment techniques and curriculum designs that respect the combined role of teachers and learners are examined.  Special emphasis will be placed on the use of Information Technology and other media to link theory with practice and foster critical thinking.  Course delivery methods include interactive sessions, mini-lectures, demonstrations, individual and team presentations, guest speakers and field studies.  Practical assignments challenge candidates to apply educational pedagogy to classroom realities.  Candidates are encouraged to develop a personal professional philosophy about teaching economics, based on critical and reflective practice.
Prerequisites:     Three full university courses in Economics. 
 

English Intermediate  EDU1101 (Course Weight 0.5)
This course engages students in the practices, resources and theories of English/Language Arts to prepare them for teaching in the intermediate grades (Grades 7-10).  Explorations of written, visual and virtual texts such as literature, media, and technology define the content.  Since language is fundamental to thinking and learning, students engage in reading, writing, viewing, talking and representing strategies as the practical grounding for understanding and reflecting on English/Language Arts practices, and for creating sound language curricula.  The content, methodologies, evaluation and skill requirements of the course will be linked to Ontario Ministry of Education and Training guidelines.
Prerequisites:    Three full university courses in English.
 

English  Intermediate/Senior  EDU1100 (Course Weight 1.0)
This course engages students in the practices, resources and theories of English/Language Arts to prepare for English teaching at I/S levels.  Written, visual and virtual texts such as literature, media and technology define the content.  Topics include teaching textual forms, writing processes, classroom language and media/technology.  Students will read, write, view, talk and represent their understanding of textuality to reflect on English/Language Arts practices and theories, as preparation for informed curriculum planning and implementation.  The content, methodologies, evaluation and skill requirements in English/Language Arts will be linked to Ontario Ministry of Education and Training guidelines.
Prerequisites:    Three full university courses in English.


Family Studies  Intermediate/Senior  EDU1160 (Course Weight 1.0)
This course explores the principles and practices in Family Studies in Ontario.  As a foundation for lesson and curriculum design, students will examine personal experience, professional practice, and current research, encompassing the evolving nature of the field, including integrated curriculum; alternative perspectives on teaching and learning; approaches to community-building, and inclusion of diverse learners; assessment and evaluation strategies; management and safety issues; utilization of technology; reciprocal school, community, and societal impact.  Assignments will require students to prepare practical applications and to apply educational pedagogy to classroom realities. Students are encouraged to develop a personal philosophy about teaching Family Studies, based on critical and reflective practice.
Prerequisites:    Three full university courses in Family Studies. (PDF)

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French as a Second Language  Intermediate  EDU1111 (Course Weight 0.5)
This course will help teacher candidates develop the skills, knowledge and dispositions expected of beginning core French teachers at the Intermediate level (Grades 7-10).  The course will focus on 1) methods and techniques to facilitate the teaching/learning of listening, speaking, reading and writing as interrelated processes; 2) integrating grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, culture, language awareness, learning strategies, media and technology and a variety of assessment strategies into lesson plans and long-term teaching units which reflect current Ministry of Education and Training guidelines; 3) methods and techniques for teaching in extended and immersion French programs.  Candidates will be involved in reflective and active learning.  This course is offered in French.
Prerequisites:    Five full university courses in French and demonstrated proficiency in speaking and writing the language.   

 French as a Second Language  Intermediate/Senior  EDU1110 (Course Weight 1.0)
This course will help teacher candidates develop the skills, knowledge, and professionalism expected of beginning core French teachers at the Intermediate and Senior levels. We will focus on:
1) methods and techniques to facilitate the teaching/learning of listening, speaking, reading and writing as interrelated processes;
2) integrating grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, culture, language awareness, learning strategies, media, technology, literature, and a variety of assessment strategies into lesson plans and long-term teaching units which reflect current Ministry of Education guidelines;
3) electronic conferencing to support a collegial learning environment;
4) the creation of a professional portfolio.
Candidates will be involved in reflective and active learning.  This course is offered in French.
Prerequisites:    Five full university courses in French and demonstrated proficiency in speaking and writing the language.   

NOTE: A PDF OCT memo outlining Qualifications required for teaching in French as a Second Language programs in English-language district school boards/school authorities and for teaching in schools and classes of French-language district school boards/school authorities can be found on the Ontario College of Teachers website

 

Geography  Intermediate  EDU1441(Course Weight 0.5)
This course facilitates the development of understandings and strategies for using the concepts and skills of geography to help students learn.  Particular emphasis will be given to the learning needs of young adolescents.  Candidates design and develop lessons and curriculum materials that are appropriate for diverse learners, and for teaching different kinds of geographic social science content, both across the curriculum and as a separate subject (Grades 7-10).
Prerequisites:    Three full university courses in Geography. 
 

Geography  Intermediate/Senior 
EDU1440 (Course Weight 1.0)
This course facilitates the development of understandings and strategies for using the concepts and skills of geography to help students learn.  Candidates develop lessons and curriculum materials that are appropriate for diverse learners and for teaching different kinds of geographic social science content, including international and cross-cultural material.  Consideration is given to issues related to current curriculum reform.  The course includes inquiry models, field study, the application of technology in learning, feedback-oriented assessment, and a variety of instructional techniques.  Assignments involve practical applications and critical reflection.
Prerequisites:    Three full university courses in Geography.
 

German - See International Languages
 


Health and Physical Education  Intermediate  EDU1251 (Course Weight 0.5)
This course of study prepares future teachers to design and deliver contemporary Intermediate level (grades 7-10) Health and Physical Education programs.  It is consistent with the national and provincial trend towards de-emphasizing competitive team sports and focuses on wellness and the process of guiding youngsters to develop the knowledge, skills and attitudes that lead one to become physically active for a lifetime.  Participants relate social, cultural, economic and political factors to teaching and student learning and their ability to work collaboratively within the school setting, systems and the community.

Health and Physical Education  Intermediate/Senior  EDU1250 (Course Weight 1.0)
This course of study prepares future teachers to design and deliver contemporary Intermediate/Senior level (grades 7-12) Health and Physical Education programs.  Teacher candidates will experience effective methods to teach movement patterns, motor skills, and team concepts so that their students will enjoy success in physical activities throughout their lifetime.  They will learn to deliver active living health concepts through various teaching methods so their future students will develop better decision-making abilities with regard to their own health.  Participants will understand and employ various teaching approaches, which acknowledge both the unique growth of individual students and also the sequential stages of learning.  Participants will also explore, practice, and evaluate safe action while teaching, coaching, and supervising physical and health education activities.
Prerequisites:    Three full university courses in Health and Physical Education.  Consideration may be given to equivalent field experience.

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History  Intermediate  EDU1151 (Course Weight 0.5)
This course has a dual focus.  First, it prepares candidates to deal with the value, issues, and challenges of teaching Intermediate History.  Second, it helps candidates develop a repertoire of diverse teaching and assessment methods appropriate for Intermediate students )Grades 7-10).  Course activities focus on Canadian History (as prescribed by the provincial guidelines), but links will be made to other histories, and to other subjects.  Course methods involve lectures, demonstrations, interactive sessions, small group activities, and field study. Assignments promote the connection of theory and practice through practical applications of the methods studied, and through reflections on practice.
Prerequisites:    Three full university courses in History.


History  Intermediate/Senior 
EDU1150 (Course Weight 1.0)
This course will introduce candidates to the methodologies and issues relevant to teaching History in Ontario in the Intermediate and Senior divisions (grades 7-12).  A variety of teaching/learning strategies, assessment techniques and approaches to curriculum design will be explored.  Adapting the History program to meet the needs of a diverse student body will be highlighted.  The course will also introduce candidates to new directions for reshaping the History curriculum.  Course methods include demonstrations, interactive sessions, small group activities and field studies.  Assignments will require candidates to develop practical applications and to link theory and practice.
Prerequisites:   Three full university courses in History.
 


INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGES  Intermediate/Senior (Course Weight 1.0)
German         EDU1140
Italian             EDU1190
Spanish        EDU1310
These courses will help teacher candidates develop the skills, knowledge and dispositions expected of beginning teachers of International Languages.  Although the emphasis will be on school programs at the Intermediate and Senior levels, the courses will also expose students to community-based programs for Intermediate level learners.  Courses focus on:  1) methods and techniques to facilitate the teaching/learning of listening, speaking, reading and writing as interrelated processes; 2) integrating grammar, vocabulary, pronunciation, culture, language awareness, learning strategies, media and technology, literature and a variety of assessment strategies into lesson plans and long-term teaching units which reflect current Ministry of Education and Training guidelines; 3) multi-level classes. Candidates will be involved in reflective and active learning.
Prerequisites:    Five full university courses in the target language and proficiency in speaking and writing the language.  Students must register for and successfully pass a proficiency test. 
    
Internship

The Internship is the culminating field-based experience and is required of all teacher candidates. It allows candidates to deepen and broaden their skills and knowledge in terms of the Ontario College of Teachers' Standards of Practice for the teaching profession.
NOTE: Course number and course weight are not applicable to the Internship. 


Italian - See International Languages


Junior/Intermediate 
EDU1450 (Course Weight 1.5)
The Junior/Intermediate curriculum course will enable teacher candidates to understand and apply the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for designing and constructing effective programs that meet the diverse needs and interests of every student.  Teacher candidates will examine instructional approaches and perspectives appropriate for teaching students in the Junior/Intermediate divisions (grades 4-10) in Ontario schools, aligned with the Ontario Ministry of Education and Training curriculum guidelines.  Emphasis will be placed on a high level of participation in course activities, including seminars, discussions, workshops, demonstrations, fieldwork, reflective practice, research, and group assignments.  Classroom organization and management, assessment and evaluation, and information technology will be integral components of curriculum studies.  Teacher candidates will participate in field experiences with partner schools throughout the year in order to facilitate the interrelationship of practice and theory. The components of this course are: 

  • Elementary Language Arts
    The language arts component is part of the broader Curriculum and Instruction course that enables candidates to understand and apply the knowledge skills and attitudes necessary for designing and constructing effective programs to meet the diverse needs of every student. In the Language Arts course candidates explore many issues of literacy development using the Ontario Curriculum and the Standards of Practice as a framework and examine instructional approaches and perspectives. Candidates engage with research, key theories and major authors in the area, gain knowledge of balanced literacy programming, utilize various methods of assessing progress in Language Arts, have experience working with a variety of teaching techniques to promote growth in reading, writing and oral and visual communication, gain skill in integrating language arts with other subject areas. Candidates are continually encouraged to relate teaching practice to relevant research and theory.
 
  • Elementary Mathematics
    The mathematics component is part of the broader Curriculum and Instruction course that enables candidates to understand and apply the knowledge skills and attitudes necessary for designing and constructing effective programs to meet the diverse needs of every student. Candidates will be exposed to a study of mathematics as a discipline that involves investigating, verifying, exploring, explaining discovering, conjecturing and describing. Candidates will be encouraged to actively engage in reflective thought through use of manipulatives, discussion and problem-solving as well as through examination of effective instructional and assessment practices, and curriculum documents and materials.

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  • Elementary Science
    The science component is part of the broader Curriculum and Instruction course that enables candidates to understand and apply the knowledge skills and attitudes necessary for designing and constructing effective programs to meet the diverse needs of every student. Candidates actively participate in integrated, hands-on learning experiences to gain exposure to the teaching and learning strategies, assessment and evaluation strategies and planning processes that enable students to achieve desired expectations from the Ontario Curriculum. 
 
  • Elementary Social Studies
    The social studies component is part of the broader Curriculum and Instruction course that enables candidates to understand and apply the knowledge skills and attitudes necessary for designing and constructing effective programs to meet the diverse needs of every student. Using the Ontario Curriculum documents, candidates in Social Studies study human beings, their interactions and the various environments in which they find themselves with an emphasis on interpretation, equitable and inclusive approaches and integration across all curricula. 
 
  • Elementary Music
    The music component is part of the broader Curriculum and Instruction course that enables candidates to understand and apply the knowledge skills and attitudes necessary for designing and constructing effective programs to meet the diverse needs of every student. This introductory course in music education is designed to prepare the prospective classroom teacher with basic skills and knowledge necessary for providing successful music experience with elementary school children.
 
  • Elementary Health and Physical Education
    The health and physical education component is part of the broader Curriculum and Instruction course that enables candidates to understand and apply the knowledge skills and attitudes necessary for designing and constructing effective programs to meet the diverse needs of every student. This course is designed to offer beginning teachers opportunity to discover health and physical education through experience in all three strands of the curriculum: healthy living, fundamental movement skills and active participation.
 
  • Elementary Visual Arts
    The visual arts component is part of the broader Curriculum and Instruction course that enables candidates to understand and apply the knowledge skills and attitudes necessary for designing and constructing effective programs to meet the diverse needs of every student. This course is designed to provide candidates with some fundamental strategies and approaches for teaching visual arts through a series of hands-on art making and art appreciation sessions.
Mathematics  Intermediate  EDU1221
(Course Weight 0.5)
This course is designed to prepare participants to teach students mathematics at the Grade 7-10 level in a thoughtful and interactive way. Participants will explore a variety of teaching techniques, which are useful in teaching and assessing today's students as they experience the current mathematics curriculum.
Prerequisites:    Three full university courses in Mathematics.  It is recommended that candidates have studied the following areas at the secondary or post-secondary level: analytic geometry, calculus, linear algebra, statistics, and problem solving.


Mathematics  Intermediate/Senior  EDU1220
(Course Weight 1.0)
A consideration of mathematics education at the intermediate and senior levels, including discussion of objectives, teaching methods, instructional materials, testing and evaluation, and selected topics from the Ministry of Education and Training Guidelines.
Prerequisites:    Three full university courses in Mathematics.  It is recommended that candidates have studied the following areas at the secondary or post-secondary level: analytic geometry, calculus, linear algebra, statistics, and problem solving.


MUSIC INTERMEDIATE    Candidates may select only one of the following: EDU1231 or EDU1241.
(Course Weight 0.5) 


Music Instrumental Intermediate EDU1231
Prerequisites: Three full university courses in Instrumental Music or demonstrated proficiency in brass, winds and strings.
OR
Music Vocal Intermediate EDU1241
Prerequisites: Three full university courses in Music, or appropriate background. 

These courses investigate approaches to music learning, teaching, and assessment through vocal and instrumental performance, conducting, listening, analysis and creative problem solving; and incorporate personal experience with music and technology (MIDI) and media arts. Candidates will develop a repertoire of diverse teaching and assessment strategies appropriate for Ontario students in Grades 7-10.  Current music education philosophies, Ministry of Education and Training policy and best practices from the field will be the basis for the designing of curriculum lessons and units.  Assignments involve practical applications of methodology and frequent personal reflections on music teaching.

MUSIC INTERMEDIATE/SENIOR    Candidates may select only one of the following: EDU1230 or EDU1240.
(Course Weight 1.0)
 
Music Instrumental Intermediate/Senior EDU1230
Prerequisites: Three full university courses in Instrumental Music or demonstrated  proficiency in brass, winds and strings.
OR
Music Vocal Intermediate/Senior EDU1240
Prerequisites: Three full university courses in Music, or appropriate background. 

These courses investigate approaches to music learning, teaching, and assessment through vocal and instrumental performance, conducting, listening, analysis and creative problem solving; and personal experience with music and technology (MIDI) and media arts.  Candidates will develop a repertoire of diverse teaching and assessment strategies appropriate for Ontario students in grades 7-graduation.  Current music education philosophies, Ministry of Education and Training policy and best practices from the field will be the basis for the designing of curriculum lessons and units.  Assignments involve practical applications of methodology and frequent personal reflections on music teaching.

Philosophy Intermediate/Senior EDU1430
(Course Weight 1.0)
The purpose of the I/S Philosophy C&I course is to prepare teacher candidates to teach HZB3O (M as of 2011) and HZT4U courses in the Social Sciences and Humanities, Ontario Curriculum (2000; updated 2009) in secondary school contexts.  A range of teaching and learning strategies, assessment practices, and approaches to curriculum design will be introduced as they relate to philosophical thought.  Teacher candidates will also have an opportunity to explore, in an integrated delivery model, several topics and issues of particular relevance to the curriculum context in which they may work. Key topics, activities and learning outcomes will address strands in both Grades 11 and Grade 12 courses, including philosophy and everyday life, metaphysics, epistemology, logic, ethics, and research and inquiry skills. Course methods will include lectures, discussions, debates, small group activities, a library session, presentations on specific thinkers and foundational/reoccurring philosophical concepts and debates, and guest speakers from key areas of philosophical specialization. Some usage of IT will be put into application. Important critiques of the philosophical canon from postmodernism, feminism, and postcolonialism will be raised throughout.
Prerequisites:    Three full university courses in Philosophy. 




Politics Intermediate/Senior EDU1260
(Course Weight 1.0)
This course explores contrasting images of political education in democratic contexts with special attention to curriculum perspectives and instructional practices used in intermediate and senior Politics courses in secondary schools in Ontario.  A variety of learning methodologies, assessment approaches and curriculum design practices will be examined and developed.  Special attention will be given to issues and questions related to 'education for citizenship' as it is addressed in the intermediate Civics course, senior Politics courses, and across the curriculum.  Course methods include lectures, demonstrations, interactive sessions, small group activities, independent and group investigations, and field studies.  Assignments will require candidates to prepare practical applications for Politics courses and to think critically and reflectively about the links between theory and practice.
Prerequisites:    Three full university courses in Political Science. 


 


Practicum    EDU4010
(Course Weight 0.5)
The Practicum consists of two main components:  (i) orientation to schools, with a focus on school culture and school community; and (ii) classroom practice related to the candidates specific program.  Teacher candidates are assigned, during fall and winter Practicum sessions, to schools or other settings approved by the Ontario College of Teachers, for a minimum of forty days of combined observation and practice related to these components.  As well, candidates may be involved in additional field activities connected to their program through the year.


Primary/Junior Education EDU1420
(Course Weight 2.0)
The Primary/Junior curriculum course will enable teacher candidates to understand and apply the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary for designing and constructing effective programs that meet the diverse needs and interests of every student.  Teacher candidates will examine instructional approaches and perspectives appropriate for teaching students in the Primary/Junior divisions (K-6) in Ontario schools, aligned with the Ontario Ministry of Education and Training curriculum guidelines.  Emphasis will be placed on a high level of participation in course activities, including seminars, discussions, workshops, demonstrations, fieldwork, reflective practice, research, and group assignments.  Classroom organization and management, assessment and evaluation, and information technology will be integral components of curriculum studies. Teacher candidates will participate in field experiences with partner schools throughout the year in order to facilitate the interrelationship of practice and theory. The components of this course are:

 
  • Elementary Language Arts
    The language arts component is part of the broader Curriculum and Instruction course that enables candidates to understand and apply the knowledge skills and attitudes necessary for designing and constructing effective programs to meet the diverse needs of every student. In the Language Arts course candidates explore many issues of literacy development using the Ontario Curriculum and the Standards of Practice as a framework and examine instructional approaches and perspectives. Candidates engage with research, key theories and major authors in the area, gain knowledge of balanced literacy programming, utilize various methods of assessing progress in Language Arts, have experience working with a variety of teaching techniques to promote growth in reading, writing and oral and visual communication, gain skill in integrating language arts with other subject areas. Candidates are continually encouraged to relate teaching practice to relevant research and theory.

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  • Elementary Mathematics
    The mathematics component is part of the broader Curriculum and Instruction course that enables candidates to understand and apply the knowledge skills and attitudes necessary for designing and constructing effective programs to meet the diverse needs of every student. Candidates will be exposed to a study of mathematics as a discipline that involves investigating, verifying, exploring, explaining discovering, conjecturing and describing. Candidates will be encouraged to actively engage in reflective thought through use of manipulatives, discussion and problem-solving as well as through examination of effective instructional and assessment practices, and curriculum documents and materials.
 
  • Elementary Science
    The science component is part of the broader Curriculum and Instruction course that enables candidates to understand and apply the knowledge skills and attitudes necessary for designing and constructing effective programs to meet the diverse needs of every student. Candidates actively participate in integrated, hands-on learning experiences to gain exposure to the teaching and learning strategies, assessment and evaluation strategies and planning processes that enable students to achieve desired expectations from the Ontario Curriculum. 
 
  • Elementary Social Studies
    The social studies component is part of the broader Curriculum and Instruction course that enables candidates to understand and apply the knowledge skills and attitudes necessary for designing and constructing effective programs to meet the diverse needs of every student. Using the Ontario Curriculum documents, candidates in Social Studies study human beings, their interactions and the various environments in which they find themselves with an emphasis on interpretation, equitable and inclusive approaches and integration across all curricula.
 
  • Elementary Music
    The music component is part of the broader Curriculum and Instruction course that enables candidates to understand and apply the knowledge skills and attitudes necessary for designing and constructing effective programs to meet the diverse needs of every student. This introductory course in music education is designed to prepare the prospective classroom teacher with basic skills and knowledge necessary for providing successful music experience with elementary school children.
 
  • Elementary Health and Physical Education
    The health and physical education component is part of the broader Curriculum and Instruction course that enables candidates to understand and apply the knowledge skills and attitudes necessary for designing and constructing effective programs to meet the diverse needs of every student. This course is designed to offer beginning teachers opportunity to discover health and physical education through experience in all three strands of the curriculum: healthy living, fundamental movement skills and active participation.
 
  • Elementary Visual Arts
    The visual arts component is part of the broader Curriculum and Instruction course that enables candidates to understand and apply the knowledge skills and attitudes necessary for designing and constructing effective programs to meet the diverse needs of every student. This course is designed to provide candidates with some fundamental strategies and approaches for teaching visual arts through a series of hands-on art making and art appreciation sessions.
     
Principles and Methods of Teaching Technological Studies ETS1010
(Course Weight 1.0)
This course is an introduction to the methodology and processes of facilitating learning in the Broad-Based Technological Education classroom. The course will provide opportunities to apply pre-instructional planning, instruction and classroom management skills, ongoing and post-instructional assessment and evaluation strategies. Emphasis is on course activities that will focus on teaching and learning theories, the dynamics of team and group learning, and the development of written and oral communication skills. Course activities include lesson planning, team practice teaching, report writing, seminar presentations, and the development of video and print student learning modules.


Psychological Foundations of Learning and Development EDU3506
(Course Weight 0.5)
This course focuses on the psychological principles of learning and development in childhood and adolescence, with particular emphasis on their relevance and application to schooling.  Its goal is to introduce students to key psychological concepts, such as intelligence and motivation, and their interrelations with the diverse developmental characteristics of the learner.  Students will also be encouraged to consider the independent and interactive roles of the student, the family, the school, and society in the learning process.


Religious Education Intermediate/Senior EDU1280
(Course Weight 1.0)
Primarily intended to prepare teachers of Religious Education in Roman Catholic secondary schools; the focus of the course is the discipline of Religious Education and not religious doctrine.  This course examines contemporary theories and issues of pedagogy, analyzes present guidelines and support materials, and addresses teaching models and assessment practices relevant to the field of Religious Education.
Prerequisites:    Five full university courses in Theology or Religious Studies.


School and Society    EDU3508
(Course Weight 0.5)
This course will help teacher candidates develop a critical awareness of the intersections among schools, classrooms, communities, and society within the changing context of the learning environment.  The course addresses the varieties of students who enter the classroom in terms of their diverse social origins, cultures, identities, and social status.  The course helps new teachers understand the ways in which their professional work (inside and beyond the classroom) helps prepare these diverse students to be active participants in a changing society.  It engages participants in an examination of the purposes of education, education policy, and of teachers' responsibility to work productively with school colleagues and other adults to achieve equitable access, experiences, and outcomes for all students.


Science - Biology Intermediate/Senior EDU1470
(Course Weight 1.0)
Designed to prepare teachers of Science in the Intermediate and Senior Divisions (Grades 7 to 10 Science and Grades 11 and 12 Biology), this course deals with the Overall and Specific Expectations of the Ontario Science Curriculum.  The course provides opportunities to develop a practical understanding of instructional methods and skills through unit and lesson planning in a variety of classroom contexts.  Furthermore, candidates will be introduced to safe laboratory work, the effective selection and use of resources, the integration of technology into teaching, a variety of assessment/evaluation strategies, and to integrate theoretical ideas and perspectives from the educational research literature with teaching and learning practices in schools.
Prerequisites:    Any five full university courses in Biology, Chemistry or Physics, with four of those in the area of Biology.

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Science - Chemistry Intermediate/Senior EDU1480
(Course Weight 1.0)
Designed to prepare teachers of Science in the Intermediate and Senior Divisions (Grades 7 to 10 Science and Grades 11 and 12 Chemistry), this course deals with the Overall and Specific Expectations of the Ontario Science Curriculum.  The course provides opportunities to develop a practical understanding of instructional methods and skills through unit and lesson planning in a variety of classroom contexts.  Furthermore, candidates will be introduced to safe laboratory work, the effective selection and use of resources, the integration of technology into teaching, a variety of assessment/evaluation strategies, and to creating an inclusive and motivating learning environment.  Throughout the program, efforts are made to integrate theoretical ideas and perspectives from the educational research literature with teaching and learning practices in schools.
Prerequisites:    Any five full university courses in Biology, Chemistry or Physics, with four of those courses in the area of Chemistry.

Science - General Intermediate EDU1301
(Course Weight 0.5)
This course is designed to prepare teachers of science in the intermediate division (Grades 7-10).  It explores the teaching of selected units in all five strands from the Ontario Science and Technology Curriculum guideline.  Attention is paid to the skills of lesson planning, laboratory techniques, teaching strategies, and assessment and resources, through workshops, lectures and lab activities.
Prerequisites:    Three full university courses in Science.


Science - General Intermediate/Senior EDU1300
(Course Weight 1.0)
Designed to prepare teachers of Science in the Intermediate and Senior Divisions , this course deals with the Overall and Specific Expectations of the Ontario Science Curriculum.  The course provides opportunities to develop a practical understanding of instructional methods and skills through unit and lesson planning in a variety of classroom contexts.  Furthermore, candidates will be introduced to safe laboratory work, the effective selection and use of resources, the integration of technology into teaching, a variety of assessment/evaluation strategies, and to creating an inclusive and motivating learning environment. Throughout the program, efforts are made to integrate theoretical ideas and perspectives from the educational research literature with teaching and learning practices in schools.
Prerequisites:    Any five full university courses in Biology, Chemistry or Physics, with a minimum of 1 full course in each of Biology, Chemistry and Physics.

Science - Physics Intermediate/Senior EDU1490
(Course Weight 1.0)
Designed to prepare teachers of Science in the Intermediate and Senior Divisions (Grades 7 to 10 Science and Grades 11 and 12 Physics), this course deals with the overall and specific expectations of the Ontario Science Curriculum.  The course provides opportunities to develop a practical understanding of instructional methods and skills through unit and lesson planning in a variety of classroom contexts.  Furthermore, candidates will be introduced to safe laboratory work, the effective selection and use of resources, the integration of technology into teaching, a variety of assessment/evaluation strategies, and to creating an inclusive and motivating learning environment.  Throughout the program, efforts are made to integrate theoretical ideas and perspectives from the educational research literature with teaching and learning practices in schools.
Prerequisites:    Any five full university courses in Biology, Chemistry or Physics, with four of those courses in the area of Physics.

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Social Sciences - General Intermediate/Senior EDU1270 (former title: Individual and Society)
(Course Weight 1.0)
This course introduces candidates to the issues around and methodologies for teaching Social Science/Contemporary Studies courses in Ontario.  A range of teaching methodologies, assessment approaches, and curriculum designs will be examined and developed.  This course will also focus on issues and questions related to current curriculum reform efforts. Course methods include lectures, demonstrations, interactive sessions, small group activities, and field studies.  Assignments will require candidates to prepare practical applications and to link theory and practice. Special emphasis will be placed on the use of information technology and other media in the classroom in order to foster critical thinking.
Prerequisites:    Three full university courses in Psychology, Sociology or Anthropology.
 

Spanish - See International Languages

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Teacher Education Seminar  EDU6000
(Course Weight 1.0)
This course focuses on the connections among the candidates' professional courses, the Practicum, and their personal experiences.  The course provides opportunities for candidates to synthesize their learning in these areas in order to develop:  an understanding of the process of becoming a teacher; a personal identity as a teacher, and a foundation for continuing professional growth as an individual and as a member of the teaching community.

In the Primary/Junior and Junior/Intermediate programs, the Teacher Education Seminar will focus on individual and collaborative processes (e.g., portfolio assessment, action research, computer conferences) that promote an integrated and informed understanding of teaching and learning through a variety of lenses, such as equity and diversity.  Directed field experiences with contributions from educators in the partnership districts will be emphasized.

In the Intermediate/Senior and Technological Studies program, the Teacher Education Seminar provides a context and reinforcement for studies undertaken in the professional courses and the Practicum, including:  principles of assessment and evaluation; effective learning environments and classroom management; special education; Standards of Practice for the teaching profession; and approaches both for promoting diversity and equity in school programs, and for addressing discrimination.

Visual Arts Intermediate EDU1011
(Course Weight 0.5)
Lectures, seminars, studio workshops, action research, and guest speakers will enable candidates to expand their understanding and appreciation of visual arts experiences, and gain confidence in their ability to deliver appropriate and challenging studio, art history, critical thinking, and aesthetics activities at the senior elementary or junior secondary level (Grades 7 to 10).  Topics include:  art education philosophy; implementing Ontario Ministry of Education and Training curriculum policy and expectations; instructional methods and strategies; authentic    assessment and practical evaluation strategies; artistic growth and adolescent development; design concepts; curriculum integration; lesson and unit planning; health and safety practices; managing art materials and the classroom environment; and use of community resources.  
Prerequisites:    Three full university courses in Visual Arts or post-secondary equivalent.  NOTE:  Candidates must have studio-oriented experience.

Visual Arts Intermediate/Senior EDU1010
(Course Weight 1.0)
Lectures, seminars, studio workshops, action research, and guest speakers will enable candidates to expand their understanding and    appreciation of visual arts experiences, and gain confidence in their ability to deliver appropriate and challenging studio, art history, critical    thinking, and aesthetics activities at the secondary level.  Topics include:  art education philosophy; implementing Ontario Ministry of Education    and Training curriculum policy and expectations; instructional methods and strategies; authentic assessment and practical evaluation strategies; artistic growth and adolescent development; design concepts; media arts and technology; lesson and unit planning; health and safety practices; managing art materials and the classroom environment; use of community resources; and the teacher's personal artistic development.
Prerequisites:    Three full university courses in Visual Arts or post-secondary equivalent.   NOTE:  Candidates must have studio-oriented experience.

 

If you have any questions, please contact:
OISE Registrar's Office, Initial Teacher Education, Admitted Students Unit
Telephone: 416-978-4300 | Email: admitted@oise.utoronto.ca

 

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Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto, 252 Bloor Street West, Toronto, Ontario M5S 1V6 CANADA