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Resources > News > Archived News & Resources from the e-Newsletter - January 2017

Archived News & Resources from the e-Newsletter - January 2017

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News

ON: Parents urge Toronto city council not to slash child care grants
Source: Global News, February 1, 2017

Excerpt: "Earlier this month, Mayor John Tory announced the city would invest $3 million to create 300 new child care subsidies. Funding the new subsidies by using occupancy grant money means 300 families get off the wait list, while the struggle just gets harder of the 18,000 families that are still waiting."

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ON: Step by step, schools push to get kids walking
Source: Toronto Star, January 30, 2017

Excerpt: "People are walking, in twos and threes and big noisy groups. Wrapped in scarves, zipped into puffy jackets. Kids and parents, grandparents and babysitters, collecting friends along the way. Not only that, it’s apparently a daily occurrence at this elementary school of 600."

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BC: Advocates call for more affordable, licensed daycares following death of toddler
Source: CBC News, January 29, 2017

Excerpt: "Gregson says finding a licensed space is hard for many parents, made all the more difficult by the high cost for care. "If you're a parent and you're looking to put your two-year-old and four-year-old in child care anywhere in metro Vancouver, you could expect to pay ... $2,200 a month," she said, adding that licensed spaces are a pipe dream for many low-income earners."

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BC: Subsidized daycare can pay for itself, study finds
Source: Business Vancouver, January 27, 2017

Excerpt: "Child care in B.C. outside Vancouver typically costs between $50 and $100 per day – about $1,000 per month. It is higher in Vancouver – about $1,200 to $1,300 per month, said Emily Mlieczko, executive director of the Early Childhood Educators of BC. A typical annual rate for a toddler in B.C. is $11,100. Subsidized at $10 per day, the average annual rate for daycare for a toddler would be just $2,600."

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QC: Equipping children with the digital literacy skills they need
Source: Montreal Gazette, January 26, 2017

Excerpt: "How can we help all children achieve excellent digital literacy? First, pay attention to basic literacy skills, talking and reading to children from birth, choosing books that engage your child and invite conversation. Electronic books can be introduced to preschoolers, especially good-quality books that contain supports for the adult reader and for the child learner (the Encyclopedia on Early Child Development has information on how to choose these books)."

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US: Make no mistake, immigration order harms children
Source: Philly.com, February 1, 2017

Excerpt: "In the last four months of 2016, 6,341 refugee children under the age of 14 arrived in the U.S. from Iran, Iraq, Syria, Sudan, Libya, and Somalia. These children represent less than 0.1 percent of the more than 10 million formally recognized refugee children around the world, most of whom live in low- or middle-income nations. Yet, the U.S. resettlement program is the largest in the world, and these children are among the most vulnerable. They include girls who have been victims of or are at risk for sexual violence, children separated from their families, and children with special medical needs."

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US: Being the Voice in Your Child’s Head
Source: The New York Times, January 30, 2017

Excerpt: "Many of the ongoing negotiations and even the battles of child-rearing are scripted for us, rolled into the daily experience of this most daily job; you get up every morning as a parent and start over with a child who is one day older than the child you had yesterday. We set limits, that’s what parents do, and children push at them, according to their temperaments and their circumstances and their peer groups."

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US: A women’s agenda for the Donald Trump era
Source: Newsday, January 27, 2017

Excerpt: "Lower earners find it cheaper to stay home with children because they can’t find work that covers the cost of child care. Meanwhile, many young parents struggle with student debt — never mind saving for college or retirement."

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US: How Vital Are Women? This Town Found Out as They Left to March
Source: The New York Times, January 22, 2017

Excerpt: "In their wake, they left behind a progressive bedroom community with suddenly skewed demographics. Routines were radically altered, and many fathers tried to meet weekend demands alone for a change. By participating in the marches and highlighting the importance of women’s rights, the women also demonstrated, in towns like Montclair, their importance just by their absence."

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AU: It’s 2017. Why is the cost of childcare still a joke?
Source: The Daily Telegraph, February 1, 2017

Excerpt: "That’s how much my husband and I would have to pay a year if we wanted to send our four children to childcare full time. -- $89,600. -- That’s $9833 more than the national average salary of $79,767. It’s $54,619 more than the minimum annual salary of $34,980.40. Translation: it’s pretty damn unaffordable. And that’s AFTER the government’s $7500 capped Child Care Rebate."

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ON: Ontario sets forth vision for childcare
Source: Inside Halton, January 25, 2017

Excerpt: "There are four pillars in Ontario's childcare strategy that the ministry is seeking input on. The first is access, which involves increasing childcare spaces as well as letting parents know about how Early Years Centres can help. Responsiveness involves the current system being able to provide parents with what they need. Affordability is a key issue for parents when childcare needs arise, as is the fourth and final touchstone, quality."

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ON: Average Toronto family could pay nearly $700 more in local taxes, fees
Source: CBC News, January 24, 2017

Excerpt: "Earlier this month, Coun. Janet Davis urged the budget committee to back away from a proposal that would eliminate the annual $4.1 million in occupancy costs paid to local school boards that have daycares in their buildings. School board trustees have already pointed out those daycares — about 350 schools currently get city money to help house daycares — would likely pass the increased costs on to parents. Eliminating the municipal subsidy would mean some parents may have to pay up to $350 more per year per child."

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ON: Proposed budget balances books with reserve funds
Source: Toronto Star, January 24, 2017

Excerpt: "Some 225 new childcare subsidies, promised by Tory after criticism of his poverty-reduction efforts, would be funded. But the budget would cut subsidies for 350 daycares in schools, potentially boosting fees for 8,400 young children. "

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BC: Kindergarten wait lists grow as enrolment rises in Victoria
Source: CBC News, January 20, 2017

Excerpt: "Nearly eight months before the start of a new school year, parents in B.C.'s capital region are concerned that their children won't have a kindergarten class to go to. Many who tried to register their kids this month for French immersion say demand for student spaces is outstripping supply. English-language parents say they're similarly concerned, especially because registration is set to begin on Monday."

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BC: Squamish needs more daycare spots
Source: The Squamish Chief, January 19, 2017

Excerpt: "Often parents looking for full-time childcare are forced to put their son or daughter in two part-time daycares, a situation that is less than ideal considering it can even be difficult for children to adjust to just one daycare. It comes down to feeling safe, and the stress caused to parents by not being able to find appropriate childcare – or any childcare at all, in many cases – must leave some of our youngest residents feeling uneasy, even if they are too young to say so."

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QC: CPE ou maternelle: 4 ans, 2 options
Source: La Presse, January 23, 2017

Excerpt (translated): "The Minister of Education Sébastien Proulx is juggling with the idea of gradually implanting kindergarten from the age of 4 on the Quebec scale. For many families in Rosemont, Côte-des-Neiges, Hochelaga-Maisonneuve or other more disadvantaged neighborhoods, in this registration season, the question already arises: nursery or kindergarten 4 years? Status quo or early entry to school? How to make the best choice for her child?"

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UK Thousands could miss out on free childcare, warns lobby group
Source: BBC, January 20, 2017

Excerpt: ""The Department for Education has been clear that the whole point of restricting the scheme to 'working families' is to encourage parents to go back to work, yet they don't seem to have factored even the most modest of adjustments into their figures, such as parents working a few more hours to become eligible."

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NZ: New Zealand children could start school at age four under cohort entry proposal
Source: Stuff, January 25, 2017

Excerpt: "Parents could soon be sending their children to school at the age four under a proposed law change to school entry arrangements. The proposal that schools have the option of "cohort entry" would mean children start primary school at the start of the term closest to their fifth birthday, rather than before their sixth. Parents would decide whether their children enter formal education at age four or five, and the Ministry of Education believed the scheme would offer greater flexibility to schools, limit early childhood education costs for families and give new entrants the opportunity to start school together."

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NZ: Early education needs funding boost from Government
Source: New Zealand Herald, January 24, 2017

Excerpt: "Several issues need to be addressed to raise quality. There's a lack of leadership within the sector, exacerbated by its rapid growth. Current pay rates mean early childhood teaching is often not a first choice career. Salaries are not attracting teachers, and applicants often lack the skills and knowledge for infants and toddlers and/or leadership."

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ON: Minister vows 'focus on families' during visit
Source: The Whig, January 17, 2017

Excerpt: "Indira Naidoo-Harris, Ontario’s minister of women’s issues and the minister responsible for early years and child care, paid a visit to Davies Hall at St. Lawrence College Tuesday evening to host a public engagement session to discuss the province’s five-year plan to create 100,000 new licensed child care spaces over the next five years for children four and younger across the province, along with a broader plan to help working families find quality, affordable care."

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ON: Mayor John Tory announces child-care subsidies, asks province and feds for more help
Source: CBC News, January 17, 2017

Excerpt: "Mayor John Tory says 300 more families will be able to get subsidized child care in 2017, but he also called on the province to shoulder the cost of occupancy grants paid to local schools that house daycares."

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ON: Parents, early-childhood educators offer province suggestions to improve daycare
Source: CBC News, January 17, 2017

Excerpt: "The rising cost of daycare was the main concern at a provincial town hall at Ottawa's Shaw Centre Monday evening. Parents raised concerns about the increasing cost of sending their children to daycare, while early-childhood educators expressed worry about having enough money to hire sufficient staff to keep more daycare spaces open."

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ON: New Ontario daycare rules worry community after-school program
News: CBC News, January 16, 2017

Excerpt: "She said her staff have interpreted the legislation to mean they will no longer be able to offer care to anyone six years of age and younger because it's not a licensed daycare."

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CA: When inequality in Canada goes up, child well-being goes down
Source: The Hamilton Spectator, January 17, 2017

Excerpt: "Given that inequalities emerge early in life — and seem to persist — it is imperative and urgent that Canada invest, develop and sustain a high quality early child development framework. While the federal government has committed to working with the provinces on early learning and child care, conversations are centred on additional daycare spaces and addressing daycare cost. These two accessibility factors are important, but we must remind our leaders in government and the community, that traditional daycare services alone only constitute one piece of the puzzle."

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CA: How much does it cost to raise a kid in Canada?
Source: Global News, January 12, 2017

Excerpt: "While there are a number of factors that come into play when estimating the costs of raising a child, three main ones stand out as the most crucial and expensive: housing, food and child care. And all three are steadily rising in Canada."

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AB: Fort McMurray faces serious shortage of child-care workers
Source: CBC News, January 12, 2017

Excerpt: "Early child-care workers are in short supply in Fort McMurray, more than eight months after a wildfire forced the entire population from their homes, says the chair of one local task force."

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Early childhood as the foundation for tomorrow’s workforce
Source: The World Bank, January 16, 2017

Excerpt: "And data shows early childhood programs can have a profound impact. An overview of 56 studies across 23 countries found impacts on health, education, cognitive ability, and emotional development. A study by Nobel Laureate James Heckman found that participants in an early childhood program in Jamaica had 25% higher wages – 20 years later. Heckman says the return on investment in early childhood is even higher than the stock market from World War II through 2008."

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FI: How Finland’s youngest learners obey the rules — by fooling around in school
Source: The Hechinger Report, January 8, 2017

Excerpt: "Children’s brains work better when they are moving, the master teacher explains. Not only do they concentrate better in class, but they are more successful at “negotiating, socializing, building teams and friendships together.”"

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ON: Toronto's new budget won't ease its 'childcare crisis,' councillor warns
Source: CBC News, January 10, 2017

Excerpt: "Toronto mothers struggling to pay for childcare spoke out at city hall on Tuesday, as councillors warned this year's proposed budget could make it even more expensive to raise a child in the city. Charlotte Genoa waited months to get a childcare subsidy from the city, and said nearly all of her earnings still go toward paying for daycare and rent."

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ON: Toronto urged to add more child care subsidies
Source: Toronto Star, January 9, 2017

Except: "Toronto would need another 5,000 child care subsidies at a cost of almost $50 million a year to make up for the growth of before- and after-school programs sparked by the introduction of full-day kindergarten in 2010, according to a new city report."

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ON: Toronto proposes ending daycare occupancy grant
Source: The Globe and Mail, January 5, 2017

Excerpt: "Toronto parents could be paying more for child care if the city moves ahead with a budget proposal to eliminate a grant that helps fund daycares in schools. City staff have proposed ending the occupancy grant that Toronto gives to childcare centres to help pay for the general maintenance of daycare spaces on school property."

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BC: Council mulls public hub with childcare, gathering spaces
Source: The Squamish Chief, January 4, 2017

Excerpt: "Can you imagine a public square in downtown Squamish that would include municipal hall, a childcare centre, offices and gathering spaces? Council envisions just that. The District of Squamish is waiting on an approximately $30,000 consultant’s Civic Block Feasibility Analysis that will outline possibilities and costs for a new municipal hall and public town centre."

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MB: Majority of Manitoba employers concerned about lack of child care spaces
Source: CTV News, January 5, 2017

Excerpt: "Seventy-six per cent of respondents to the Probe Research survey said the lack of child care in Manitoba is a serious issue for businesses. Meanwhile, 63 per cent of respondents said government should have no role helping companies open on-site workplace daycares. Only 24 per cent of respondents think government should help companies create child care for employees."

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NB: Changes to preschool autism services upsetting parents
Source: CBC News, January 9, 2017

Excerpt: "An announcement regarding these changes, was made on Dec. 20 and Autism Intervention Services of Fredericton was awarded the contract to provide the preschool service province-wide. Funding per child increased from $27,500 to $33,000. Parents will receive training to increase involvement. Other changes include working with the school districts to improve transition to school."

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DE: In Germany, Parents Can Sue the Government for Failing to Provide Child Care
Source: The Atlantic, January 10, 2017

Excerpt: "In 2013, Germany declared that every child over the age of 1 has the legal right to a space in a public daycare facility. This past fall, while America’s election unfolded, Germany’s highest court took this mandate one step further: It ruled that parents may sue for lost wages if they can’t find a place for their child in a public daycare center."

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RW: Why your child should not skip kindergarten education
Source: The New Times, January 11, 2017

Excerpt: "The early childhood development policy of 2011 states that interventions in the early years have the potential to offset the negative trends and to provide young children with more opportunities and better outcomes in terms of access to education, quality of learning, physical growth, health and productivity. The policy shows that early investment is critical as delays in the early years are difficult and costly to reverse later in life."

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ON: Parents urge Toronto not to cut daycare funding
Source: Toronto Star, January 4, 2017

Excerpt: "School-age programs, which serve another 17,000 kids, don’t pay rent during the school year. The cut, slated for July, would not affect low-income parents receiving subsidies, who make up about half of those using school-based centres. But parents paying full fees would see costs jump by $1.35 per day or about $350 per year, per child."

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ON: TDSB serves 136,000 meals to students each day as child poverty rises
Source: CBC News, January 3, 2017

Excerpt: "It costs about $1.50 to feed a child a healthy breakfast and about $2.50 for lunch, according to the board. The school food programs are funded by parents who can afford the fees, the municipality, the board and private donations."

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ON: While PA Debates Merits of Pre-K, Ontario Goes All-In
Source: 90.5 WESA, December 29, 2016

Excerpt: "It’s something that’s been commonplace in Ontario for the past few years, but before that, was thought of as a pipe dream: full-day, junior and senior kindergarten, open to all 4 and 5-year-olds in the province."

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ON: Wynne says benefits of Ontario's growth not evenly distributed
Source: The Globe and Mail, December 19, 2016

Excerpt: "The first will be creating 100,000 more child-care spaces over five years, in a move to make it easier for parents to join the work force. “We know that there is not enough participation by women, for example, in the work force in the way that they want to be engaged,” she said. “So getting our child-care investments right and making sure that we provide the range of options that families need.”"

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CA: Pierre Fortin: Now is the right time for a national childcare policy
Source: Vancouver Sun, December 16, 2016

Excerpt: "There is no question that the family should remain the bedrock on which child education is built. But for scientific and practical reasons, there is also a need for early childhood education and care programs."

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CA: Minister Duclos reinforces the Government of Canada's commitment to children and families at a roundtable with key stakeholders to discuss early learning and child care
Source: Government of Canada, December 15, 2016

Excerpt: "While setting the stage for discussions to come, Minister Duclos reiterated the Government’s commitment to increase the affordability, quality, flexibility and inclusivity of early learning and child care. To achieve this objective, the federal government has been working closely with provinces and territories to develop an ELCC Framework. The Framework is expected to represent a significant milestone for national collaboration, with governments agreeing to work together to address some of the key early learning and child care issues across the country."

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BC: Syrian refugees face challenges accessing childcare in Kamloops
Source: CBC News, December 28, 2016

Excerpt: "The challenge to find childcare is not unique to refugee families. Janis Arner directs the Childcare Resources and Referral Early Years Centre with the YM/YWCA in Kamloops. She says there is a shortage of spots across the city."

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NS: Nova Scotians need $19/hour to keep heads above water, report says
Source: CBC News, December 22, 2016

Excerpt: "The living wage for a hypothetical family of four where both parents work full time, one child is in full-time daycare and the other needs after-school care is $19.17 an hour in Halifax, while in Antigonish it's $17.30. The province's minimum wage is $10.70."

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PE: Changes to Early Learning and Child Care Act now in effect
Source: CBC News, January 2, 2017

Excerpt: "The new act includes updated health and safety requirements for childcare centres, stipulations on equipment to be used and curriculum to be followed."

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US: Child Care Scarcity Has Very Real Consequences for Working Families
Source: NPR, January 3, 2017

Excerpt: "The answer boils down to the fact that child care, particularly infant care, is an extremely low profit field. Costs are high, factoring in real estate, supplies, insurance and, above all, labor. Many states require a ratio of one caregiver to every three or four babies."

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US: Screen Time Reality Check — For Kids and Parents
Source: npr, December 26, 2016

Excerpt: "And to complicate matters further — it isn't just kids' screen time that parents need to think about. A recent study by Common Sense Media found that parents spend, on average, almost nine and a half hours a day in front of a screen. And nearly 80 percent of those surveyed said they think they're modeling good media and watching habits for their kids."

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US: The days of stay-at-home moms are 'long gone,' report says
Source: Chicago Tribune, December 22, 2016

Excerpt: "Nearly two-thirds of American moms these days (64.4 percent) are breadwinners, the researchers found. That's a hop from 63.3 percent in 2012, the year of the last analysis, and a leap from 1970, when roughly a quarter could claim the title."

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US: Parents pay extra to find child care in the right place at the right time
Source: The Washington Post, December 18, 2016

Excerpt: "Many new parents describe a maddening search for child care, encountering wait lists 200 names deep or two years long and child-care administrators who do not return repeated phone calls, overwhelmed by requests from prospective clients who start knocking sometimes before they are even pregnant. After all of that, when a coveted spot becomes available, many parents seize on it, even if they don’t need it — yet."

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MX: Mexico: The Power of Early Education
Source: Aljazeera, January 2, 2017

Excerpt: "There is an increasing amount of evidence about the importance of early years education. UNICEF calls it one of the most cost-efficient investments in human capital leading to a country's sustainable development."

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Resources

Raising the Village twitter account
Source: Toronto Children’s Services, January 2017

Excerpt: "Announcing the launch of the official Raising the Village twitter account! @TOchildoutcomes In November Children's Services launched the Raising the Village population outcomes and indicators in an effort to measure the health and well being of children and families in Toronto. We have been able to incorporate and analyze a number of data sources to create baseline data. Much of the data has come from Toronto Public Health and the Toronto District School Boards' student census. The Raising the Village is a live data base that will be updated as new data is received. We are in the process of adding new data sets from recent partners. It is for this reason we have created a twitter account, to help raise awareness of the data base and keep you abreast of any new information."

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Family Literacy (video)
Source: Science for Early Child Development, January 27, 2017

Excerpt: "Around the world, reading together is a popular family literacy activity. The closeness and comfort of a caring adult along with the words and pictures in a favourite book provide children with a multisensory experience that supports early language and literacy development. It is also a way for adults to connect with children as individuals and build caring relationships. Simply put, it is a wonderful way for adults and children to enjoy each other’s company."

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Parent’s Physical Activity Associated with Preschooler Activity in Underserved Populations
Source: American Journal of Preventive Medicine, January 9, 2017

Excerpt: "In the U.S., children from low-income families are more likely to be obese. The impact of parent modeling of physical activity (PA) and sedentary behaviors in low-income American ethnic minorities is unclear, and studies examining objective measures of preschooler and parent PA are sparse."

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STEM Starts Early: Grounding Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math Education in Early Childhood
Source: The Joan Ganz Cooney Center, February 2, 2017

Excerpt: "STEM Starts Early is the culmination of a deep inquiry supported by the National Science Foundation that aims to better understand the challenges to and opportunities in STEM learning as documented in a review of early childhood education research, policy, and practice and encourages collaboration between pivotal sectors to implement and sustain needed changes."

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Technology in early childhood education
Source: Encyclopedia on Early Childhood Development, November 2016

Excerpt: "Screen media are increasingly common in young children's life. It is therefore essential to understand the impact of specific technologies such as tablets or e-books for literacy and the best ways to include these technologies in children's routine at home, in childcare or in the classroom. Emerging practices and their implications for parents, teachers and policy makers are reviewed in this topic."

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Response to the “Building A Better Future”: Ontario’s consultation on the Early Years and Child Care by Petr Varmuza and Laura Coulman, PhD Candidates at OISE, University of Toronto, Department of Applied Psychology and Human Development, Early Learning Cohort
Source: Atkinson Centre, January 20, 2017

Excerpt: "What is needed now, for the early years and child care system, can be achieved in a gradual, orderly transition following from the innovative work that was set underway when your government created the public alternative to private delivery of early childhood education and care in Ontario for children ages four and five years. The reality is that more than one quarter of families in which parents are working or in school for 30 or more hours per week, have no regular child care arrangements. They resort to split shifts and weekend work which results in poorer work-life balance, reduced family time, and increased stress. And, of the children who are in a care arrangement full-time, more than one third are in informal care arrangements."

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The relationship between teacher qualification and the quality of the early childhood care and learning environment
Source: Campbell Collaboration, January 20, 2017

Excerpt: "The objective of this review is to synthesise the extant empirical evidence on the relationship of teacher qualifications to the quality of the early childhood learning environment. Specifically, we address the question: Is there a relationship between the level and type of education of the lead teacher, and the quality of the early childhood learning environment, as measured by the Early Childhood Environment Rating Scale, the Infant Toddler Environment Rating Scale and their revised versions?"

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Vulnerability of families with children: experts’ opinions about the future and what families think about it
Source: FamiliesAndSocieties, January 11, 2017

Excerpt: "Problems with balancing work and family life are also linked to economic vulnerability. Limited access to affordable and good quality childcare, long-term care provisions, insufficient leaves or inflexible working arrangements often result in a decision to leave the labour market or to reduce one’s working hours (Lilly, Laporte, & Coyte, 2007; OECD, 2007). The “care penalty” negatively affects the economic position of (especially) women and their economic standing over their life course as well as their pension rights (Evandrou & Glasser, 2003)."

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New research suggests maternity leave is more important for mothers than it is for their kids
Source: Quartz, January 5, 2017

Excerpt: "How long should women take off from work after having a baby? It’s a charged question. Scandinavians think women should have a lot of time; Americans seem to think women need little or no time at all. At the heart of the question is the effect on children: Does it help or hurt them to have a parent at home?"

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Socio-Economic Impact Analysis of the $10aDay Child Care Plan for British Columbia
Source: Early Childhood Educators of B.C., January 17, 2017

Excerpt: "Notably, Canadian parents tend to have relatively high price elasticities of demand, meaning that changes in child care fees have a large influence on parents’ decision to use child care, compared to those found in other countries. The higher price sensitivity of Canadian parents could be because they are paying more out of pocket. In many countries, fees paid by parents represent a smaller share of total costs than for Canadian parents. In our analysis of the effect of prices on demand the price elasticity was assumed to be -1.0, which is similar to the estimate used by Cleveland et al. (2016) for their analysis of child care in the City of Toronto."

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Realizing Human Potential in the Fourth Industrial Revolution - An Agenda for Leaders to Shape the Future of Education, Gender and Work
Source: World Economic Forum, January 2017

Excerpt: "In Germany, every child between the ages of one to school entry age has the legal right to early childcare support in a public day care centre. Municipalities are responsible for the provision of day care facilities and the federal government provides extensive financial and qualitative support for the needs-based expansion of day care services for children under three. Starting this year, a federal programme will provide access outside of normal childcare facility hours to benefit single parents, shift workers and others working outside of usual childcare hours."

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Play, cognitive skills in kindergarten predict extracurricular activities in middle school
Source: Science Daily, January 10, 2017

Excerpt: "In civic engagement research there has been a focus on examining the gap in civic engagement among low-income communities and their higher-income counterparts. However, little research has focused on how civic engagement develops early in life, as opposed to in adolescence or adulthood, despite the fact that young children indeed are active citizens in school, home, and peer groups."

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CARE Lisbon Conference 2016 – Resources, Presentations and Papers
Source: CARE, January 8, 2017

Excerpt: "The final CARE conference took place on October 6th and 7th 2016 in Lisbon, and gathered more than 50 people, including researchers, European policymakers, and invited experts to discuss the project’s findings on early childhood education and care."

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Tapping a "Motherload" of Opportunity: How BC Can Gain from More Accessible Childcare
Source: Business Council of BC, December 6, 2017

Excerpt: "Access to child care is not just an issue for women and their families, it’s also a business and human capital issue. Some estimates suggest that, with greater access to child care, increased maternal labour supply could boost employment income by several hundred million dollars per year."

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Policies for Families: Is there a Best Practice?
Source: FamiliesAndSocieties, December 2016

Excerpt: "This policy brief highlights recent research findings of the project “FamiliesAndSocieties” on the current trends in social policies related to families in Europe. It focuses on crucial policy issues related to youth, gender equality and childcare arrangements. The brief also presents suggestions for policy interventions linked to the findings."

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Celebrating 60 years of philanthropy and community impact: Science of Early Child Development, Red River College of Applied Arts, Science and Technology, Manitoba
Source: Lawson Foundation, December 14, 2016

Excerpt: "The Science of Early Child Development (SECD) is a multi-media, multi-edition interactive educational resource designed to share the science and information about the vital importance of the early years. From the latest research into brain development and the social determinants of health to topics such as literacy and the importance of play, SECD shows how the foundations of individuals and societies are formed in the early years. SECD shows how the foundations of individuals and societies are formed in the early years."

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Scanning reveals what pregnancy does to a mother’s brain
Source: The Economist, December 24, 2016

Excerpt: "As any parent will tell you, once you have had children nothing is ever quite the same. Including, it seems, their mothers’ brains. In a paper just published in Nature Neuroscience, a team led by Elseline Hoekzema of the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, in Spain, describe for the first time how pregnancy alters women’s brains, rewiring them in ways that persist long after a child has been born."

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The “Dig into Play” Story: Reimagining Public Spaces for Play
Source: AECEO, December 20, 2016

Excerpt: "“Risky Play,” is a topic that is at the forefront of the play movement both in Canada, and internationally. The focus of Dig into Play isn’t directly rooted in “risky” play, however, this way of playing can be uncomfortable for some adults, and as such, needed to be addressed. After an on-site session at one of our gardens, an adult-lead expressed concern about a group of 4-5 year olds using adult-sized garden tools (long handled shovels and garden forks). She felt she couldn’t leave the area in which the children were working for fear that someone would get hurt by the tools. Observation notes documented that the children were cautioning one another about safety while the Garden Play Educator was present. Statements such as, “Back up guys! I’m going to try to lift this”; “Everyone move back! I’m gonna pry it up”; and, “This is a long shovel. You need to back up when I say ‘CLEAR THE WAY!’” were recorded by the observer."

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Determinants of Change in Physical Activity in Children 0–6 years of Age: A Systematic Review of Quantitative Literature
Source: Springer International Publishing, December 17, 2016

Excerpt: "By the age of 5 years, over one in five children are overweight or obese the UK and USA. Obesity in childhood is associated with a range of unfavourable outcomes including type 2 diabetes, hyperlipidaemia and psychosocial problems, with obesity known to track and be associated with unfavourable outcomes in adulthood. Early childhood is a period of rapid growth and development, and the preschool years (defined here as up to the age of 6 years) are therefore ideal to both prevent and reverse unhealthy weight gain, by establishing healthy habits and behaviours."

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Improving child-teacher interactions can reduce preschoolers' stress levels
Source: Science Daily, December 6, 2016

Excerpt: "A school-based intervention that promotes warm and caring interactions between a teacher and child can reduce the child's stress in the classroom, a new study has found."

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