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CIDE SEMINAR

July 2nd, 2020 - 11:30 AM-1:00 PM

" Comparing the Role of National Actors in Higher Education Policymaking in Senegal and Ghana" - Christian Noumi

"Peace And Conflict Resolution Through Science Pedagogy In   Bangladesh: Religious And Secular Students' Perspectives" - Pamelia Khaled

 

Christian Noumi is currently a PhD candidate at OISE (University of Toronto). His PhD dissertation examines the role of national stakeholders in higher education policymaking in Africa. He holds an MA in Higher Education Research & Development from the University of Kassel (Germany), a BA in History and a Teacher’s Diploma both from the University of Yaoundé (Cameroon), and is a certified Project Management Professional (PMP®) His research interests include higher education and society in Africa; higher education policymaking and governance; and change management in higher education. He has co-authored several book chapters and peer-reviewed articles on higher education in Canada and in several African countries. Christian has an extensive understanding of the higher education context in multiple African countries, having lived and studied in Cameroon, and conducted fieldwork in Senegal and Ghana. Currently, Christian works as a consultant for GIZ to support the implementation of the Strategic Plan of the PanAfrican University.

 

Pamelia Khaled is a doctoral candidate at the Department of Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning, OISE, University of Toronto. The title of her study is Peace and conflict resolution through science pedagogy in Bangladesh: Religious and Secular students' perspectives. Her thesis supervisor is Prof. Wanja Gitari, and committee members are Prof. Kathy Bickmore and Prof. Jack Miller. Her doctoral research was based in Bangladesh, and her study analyzed Grade 10 students' perspectives on their learning of science and students' reports of the use of science in their everyday life to negotiate peace and resolve conflicts. She has a keen research interest in holistic approaches in curricula for Bangladesh and other multicultural societies, such as those in other Asian countries and Canada. Currently, she is working as a Teacher Assistant at the Sociology

Department, UTSC. She completed Masters in Sociology (1983) and M. Phil in Anthropology (2000) from Dhaka University, Bangladesh. She also completed her Masters in Environmental Studies at York University (2011). She has published papers in peer-reviewed journals, and her two books have been accepted for publication by BRAC Press in 2020.  More than 200 articles (short opinion pieces) on feminist political economy and education published in Bangladesh and Canada. 

 

"Comparing the Role of National Actors in Higher Education Policymaking in Senegal and Ghana" - Christian Noumi

 

This presentation will explore the role of national actors in higher education policymaking in Senegal and Ghana. Specifically, it will examine the nature of these policy actors, their role and strategies to influence policies, as well the factors that influence their role in the policymaking process. This presentation is based on a qualitative case study research that used “neo-corporatist policy network” and “postcolonial theory” as analytical frameworks.For Senegal, findings revealed that while constituencies such as the state, faculty, students, and higher education institutions exhibited different levels of organization, they were able to influence policies using several strategies, including expertise and strike actions. The policy network in Senegal pointed towards neo-corporatism, with several functional groups representing specific constituencies. In contrast, faculty, students, and higher education institutions in Ghana had a higher level of organization, with more formal and institutionalized involvement in policymaking. The policy network in Ghana was comparatively more neo-corporatist with highly organized and sophisticated interest groups. In both countries, various factors influenced the role of national actors in the policy process, including the colonial legacy of each higher education system. In addition, national actors expressed strong agency, suggesting a postcolonial approach to policymaking. 

 

"Peace And Conflict Resolution Through Science Pedagogy In   Bangladesh: Religious And Secular Students' Perspectives" Pamelia Khaled

 

This ethnographic study based in Bangladesh analyzed Grade 10 students' perspectives on the learning of science concerning peace and conflict resolution, and the use of science in their everyday lives to negotiate peace and resolve conflicts. A conceptual framework was constructed from the literature on peace education, holistic curriculum and science pedagogy. Tagore's holistic learning models were juxtaposed with Gandhi's non-violent, Dewey's experiential learning, and Miller's holistic pedagogy. Purposive sampling was used to select 24 Grade 10 science students from the Religious and Secular streams. Data collection tools included classroom observations, interviews, focus group discussions, reflective field notes, and textbook analysis. Six science teachers and two headteachers were consulted for contextual information and to corroborate findings from the students. Data were analyzed using an inductive approach. The findings indicate that there was a lack of holistic pedagogical approaches to teaching science in Secular compared to the Religious stream. The predominant teaching approach is the teacher- and textbook-centred, echoing the need for Tagore's comprehensive models of learning that promote peace through science. A corresponding finding is the awareness of conflict and the exploration of the role of the science curriculum in peace, conflict resolution, and tolerance in society—this exhibit by both streams.

Chair: Kathy Bickmore

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