Summer Institute (July 26-27, 2019)

Centre for Media, Culture and Education (CMCE) |  OISE Continuing and Professional Learning (CPL)

About

Join fellow PK-20 educators, students and activists for a 2-day professional learning institute designed to support the application of critical media literacy and social justice themes into your practice. Engage in academic discussions and participate in hands-on workshops that will enable effective transformative digital media literacy education in your curriculum design, pedagogical approaches, and teaching tools.

Through enhanced lectures, research-informed presentations and facilitated peer discussions, you will:

  • Appreciate the myriad of ways that engagement with digital tools and media platforms impact youth, children and adults
  • Apply these insights to deliver more impactful yet inclusive media and digital literacy education
  • Develop and hone skills in enacting media and digital literacy education that:
  • contribute to non-violent and non-oppressive social relations
  • speak to important issues of racial justice and equity
  • undermine Eurocentric knowledge paradigms dominating the field
  • Connect with other educators, learners and institutions and develop professional networks in the media literacy field
Who Should Attend?

K-20 education professionals who have accountability for student teaching and learning (ex: Teachers, Faculty, Principals, Curriculum Designers, Instructional Strategists)

Media and digital activists working with youth and communities

Schedule

July 26th, 2019 8:30 AM-5:30 PM
July 27th, 2019 8:30 AM-5:00 PM

Format
  • 7 Interactive Workshops with Critical Media Scholars
  • Open-Forum Round table Discussions
  • Education Panel with Q & A
  • Presentation Materials
  • Networking Reception

Breakfast, Lunch and Light Refreshments included
Please indicate any dietary restrictions and preferences at point of registration.

Registration Fee

Early-Bird Registration Rate (paid on or before May 31): $495 CAD

Regular Rate (paid after May 31): $595 CAD

Program Topics

Research shows that mass media and popular culture play major role in sexual and gender-based violence in all spheres of social life, including education. However, media literacy educators have been slow in conceptualizing media-based education that could address the issue. This workshop will present a media literacy platform for teaching sexual ‘consent’ among adolescent learners rooted in research on sexual violence prevention, best practices in media literacy education, and theories on race, gender, sexuality, and non-violent relations. Participants in the workshop will develop knowledge in the area of media and sexual violence and skill in fostering peer-led discussion and definitions of intimacy, dating, and consent, as well as creative media and digital productions allowing young people to engage in healthy relationships. Participants will also discuss ways to assess learners’ understanding of consent and non-violent communication in social media and digital spaces.

This workshop offers protocols, advice, practices, and guides to help find and authenticate Indigenous resources on the Internet and use these resources in media and digital literacy education. Rooted in decolonizing frameworks and transformative pedagogies, the workshop will introduce participants to Digital Bundle: an original Indigenous theory that examines the ethics and transference of knowledge into new digital platforms inspired by Indigenous media and digital activism, such as Indigenous Resurgence and the Internet, Decolonizing the Digital, and Lighting New Fires for the Internet.

Critical making is situated within a socio-constructionist approach to education. Here, the belief is that the process of coming-to-know is most effective when learners are actively engaged in making tangible artefacts, including digital content; and, importantly, there is an emphasis on making to solve real world problems connected to issues like sustainability, gender and social inequities, digital citizenship and community engagement, to name a few. The workshop will provide opportunities for participants to both hear about research in media and digital making with marginalized youth and attempt critical making as a vehicle for self-discovery, learning, change-making, and engaging in personally relevant making experiences. 

This workshop will translate into curriculum and teaching practice important insights pertaining to media users’ cognitive processes, emotional needs, behaviours, and identity formations. Participants in the workshop will learn about how and why young people choose media content, form views based on social media information, learn and practice racial and gender preferences and relations, and resist authority. The workshop will discuss the implications of this research for media literacy educators and invite participants to relate it to the particularities of their teaching contexts and learners. The workshop will also introduce participants to a practical pedagogical approach countering the cultural and psychological formation of stereotypes constructed in mass media and popular culture.

This workshop will translate into curriculum and teaching practice important insights pertaining to media users’ cognitive processes, emotional needs, behaviours, and identity formations. Participants in the workshop will learn about how and why young people choose media content, form views based on social media information, learn and practice racial and gender preferences and relations, and resist authority. The workshop will discuss the implications of this research for media literacy educators and invite participants to relate it to the particularities of their teaching contexts and learners. The workshop will also introduce participants to a practical pedagogical approach countering the cultural and psychological formation of stereotypes constructed in mass media and popular culture.

Educators, researchers, and activists dedicated to social justice often face resistance from students, school administrators, and even parents. Social justice teachers are accused of “liberal bias” or “politicizing education” and these perceptions mute discussions of important social issues in all levels of education. This workshop introduces media and digital literacy teachers and activists to effective ways to counter such resistance and engage learners in rigorous yet ethical conversations about social issues centered on the lives and knowledges of learners. Participants in the workshop will debate power relations in their classrooms, their ethical and moral responsibilities as teachers and citizens, and learn about concrete and potent media-based pedagogical approaches conducive to dialogue and understanding of difference.    

As part of 21st century learning, critical media literacy is an essential skill to help students become more informed media consumers and producers. This session will support the teaching of critical media literacy with specific considerations for Black students. Participants will develop anti-racist pedagogical strategies to interrogate the stereotypes of Black people perpetuated in the media and the long-term impact of these negative and homogenizing media narratives on Black students. We will examine representations of Black people in the media and the way(s) in which they shape how Black people are perceived and treated in society, including educational spaces. Participants will engage in critical conversations about race and racism and develop instructional strategies to disrupt stereotypical representations of Black people through counter-narratives that restore and affirm rather than destroy

Information

Wheelchair accessible and gender-neutral washrooms are available at multiple locations throughout OISE. An Accessible ramp can be found at the front entrance of the building. Accessibility requirements can be communicated at the time of registration.

If any additional accommodations are needed, please contact oise.cpl@utoronto.ca. Request should be made as soon as possible.

Co-Hosts

The Centre for Media in Education and the Office of Continuing and Professional Learning, Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), University of Toronto are pleased to be collaborating on this initiative.

Interested in sponsoring this institute? We’d love to hear from you!

We invite all interested sponsors to connect with the OISE Continuing and Professional Learning office directly at oise.cpl@utoronto.ca.