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Deepening Knowledge.

Geography

 

Lesson plans

Where we live - Who we are

Grade 7-10: Level Intermediate/Senior

From Parks Canada. 

From the website: "The heritage and history of some Canadians go back much further in Canada than those of others. These first inhabitants developed technologies that enabled them to live in balance with the environment in which they lived. In each region of the country, they developed different cultures and ways of life, depending in part on the climate and the natural resources available to them. This activity explores the history of how different Aboriginal groups interacted with the environment in which they lived. Aboriginal peoples of Canada adapted to change in the past, and continue to do so today."

 

Resources

Resources on water:

Watermark by Edward Burtynsky

From the website: Watermark is a feature documentary from multiple-award winning filmmakers Jennifer Baichwal and Nick de Pencier, and renowned photographer Edward Burtynsky, marking their second collaboration after Manufactured Landscapes in 2006. The film brings together diverse stories from around the globe about our relationship with water: how we are drawn to it, what we learn from it, how we use it and the consequences of that use. We see massive floating abalone farms off China’s Fujian coast and the construction site of the biggest arch dam in the world – the Xiluodu, six times the size of the Hoover. We visit the barren desert delta where the mighty Colorado River no longer reaches the ocean, and the water-intensive leather tanneries of Dhaka.We witness how humans are drawn to water, from the U.S. Open of Surfing in Huntington Beach to the Kumbh Mela in Allahabad, where thirty million people gather for a sacred bath in the Ganges at the same time. We speak with scientists who drill ice cores two kilometers deep into the Greenland Ice Sheet, and explore the sublime pristine watershed of Northern British Columbia. Shot in stunning 5K ultra high-definition video and full of soaring aerial perspectives, this film shows water as a terraforming element, as well as the magnitude of our need and use. In Watermark, the viewer is immersed in a magnificent force of nature that we all too often take for granted- until it’s gone.
 

The Water Walkers Documentary

From the website: Anishinabe women from Thunder Bay, Ontario are walking the perimeters of the Great Lakes in order to raise awareness about water issues like conservation, pollution and privatization. Walking an average of 40 miles a day, the women pick up supporters and meet with concerned people and activists as they go. Their message is simple: They want future generations to have clean water to drink. The Water Walkers will walk around Lake Erie in the summer of 2007. Josephine Mandamin's thoughts on being an Elder Water Walker.

Atlas Resources:

The Decolonial Atlas: The Great Lakes in Ojibwe

From the website: The Decolonial Atlas, started in 2014, is an attempt to bring together maps which, in some way, challenge our relationship to the land, people, and state. It is based on the premise that there is no such thing as 'truth' in cartography. Only interpretation. The orientation of a map, its projection, the presence of political borders, which features are included or excluded, and the language used to label a map are all subject to the map-maker's agenda. Because most maps in use today serve to reinforce colonial understanding of the Earth, we are consciously creating maps which help us to re-imagine the world--to decolonize. 

The Decolonial Atlas: St. Louis in Ojibwe 

From the website: The Decolonial Atlas, started in 2014, is an attempt to bring together maps which, in some way, challenge our relationship to the land, people, and state. It is based on the premise that there is no such thing as 'truth' in cartography. Only interpretation. The orientation of a map, its projection, the presence of political borders, which features are included or excluded, and the language used to label a map are all subject to the map-maker's agenda. Because most maps in use today serve to reinforce colonial understanding of the Earth, we are consciously creating maps which help us to re-imagine the world--to decolonize. 

The Decolonial Atlas: St. Louis in the Fox Language 

From the website: The Decolonial Atlas, started in 2014, is an attempt to bring together maps which, in some way, challenge our relationship to the land, people, and state. It is based on the premise that there is no such thing as 'truth' in cartography. Only interpretation. The orientation of a map, its projection, the presence of political borders, which features are included or excluded, and the language used to label a map are all subject to the map-maker's agenda. Because most maps in use today serve to reinforce colonial understanding of the Earth, we are consciously creating maps which help us to re-imagine the world--to decolonize. 

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