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    October 14
    Federal officials rethink wording of markers at gravesites of past prime ministers. OISE's Cecilia Morgan weighs in
    Federal officials overseeing prime ministerial gravesites in Canada are rethinking what should be done to reflect how the country views its past, specifically in light of historical mistreatment of Indigenous Peoples. Prof. Cecilia Morgan, a social and cultural historian from OISE, said the usual tension that surrounds commemorations can be exacerbated when the focus is on a historical figure who has taken on a larger symbolism in the public's mind, and whose actions or achievements are thrown under a more critical light. Read more.
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    October 08
    Meet Normand Labrie: 5 questions with OISE's new interim dean
    Get to know OISE's new interim dean: what keeps him motivated, how he became interested in sociolinguistics and why teaching underprivileged students in India became one of the most rewarding times of his life. Watch here.
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    October 08
    Cultivate curiosity, and really listen: How to persuade people whose politics you don't agree with: OISE's Megan Boler
    Polarizing words may be throwing progressives off course - but research might hold lessons for the left on how to have more meaningful conversations. For OISE prof. Megan Boler, her interest lies in the role social media plays in online polarization. For those on the left, pithy statements on social media like "check your privilege" amplify anger, and not always in useful ways, says Boler. To cut through a polarizing online ecosystem, you will need to find a way to unite. Read more.
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    October 08
    Shared experiences: How five international students are contributing to U of T's global outlook
    Suddene Stone, who plans to complete a master's and PhD in clinical psychology at OISE, says moving to multicultural Toronto from his native Jamaica expanded his worldview in unexpected ways. Now the future OISE student hopes to gain practical experience in the field of mental health while in Canada. "People who are seriously mentally ill often go undiagnosed or don't have access to proper care," he says. "I want to help change that." Read more about Stone's path to OISE. Read more.
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    October 07
    Home child care in Canada should be affordable, high-quality - and licensed: OISE researchers
    There are many issues surrounding oversight and quality of home child care in Ontario, including health and safety and provider qualifications, say Prof. Michal Perlman and OISE researcher Petr Varmuza - who add that roughly 80% of home child care arrangements are unlicensed. In a new article, Perlman and Varmuza create a case for modernizing the province's home child care licensing and supports and give a model for higher quality home care. Read more.
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    October 07
    From curious sociolinguist to accomplished educational leader: Normand Labrie's journey to becoming interim dean of OISE
    Professor Normand Labrie reflects on his journey to becoming interim dean at OISE - from studying the educational trajectories of Turkish-speaking children in Germany as an undergrad to lending his skills to European Commission, the Agence universitaire de la Francophonie, UNESCO and more. Meet Dean Normand Larbie. Read more.
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    September 30
    Two Indigenous scholars at OISE read a history textbook chapter on residential schools. This is what they would change
    National Day of Truth and Reconciliation: For generations, the subject of residential schools was absent from textbooks altogether. Although Ontario students are now introduced to it in textbooks, there is still much to be done, says OISE professors Jennifer Brant and Eve Tuck. They read through the pages of a Grade 8 history textbook and highlight changes that still must be made in the way Ontario students are taught about residential schools. Read more.
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    September 30
    Here's how OISE community members are honouring the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation
    'Actively working to understand my own complicity:' On the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation, we asked OISE community members how they are honouring this day. From virtual circles to learning from elders and supporting Indigenous organizations, here are some ways they are spending today. Read more.
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    September 30
    Pandemic led to rising homelessness, depression among Toronto's queer, trans people says alum Dr. Alex Abramovich
    'There's no social escape': Queer and transgender people in the Greater Toronto Area have struggled exceptionally in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, new research by OISE alum Dr. Alex Abramovich shows, from experiencing higher rates of homelessness to worsening mental health symptoms. Read more.
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    September 29
    Professor Jennifer Brant on how Canadians can mark the first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation
    Ahead of Canada's first National Day for Truth and Reconciliation to honour residential school survivors, Prof. Jennifer Brant says Canadians must do their own work to reflect on and understand what Truth and Reconciliation means. This involves learning about the country's role in the genocide of Indigenous Peoples and the history of colonialism. In U of T News, Brant discusses how Canadians can mark Sept. 30, where they should turn to learn about the ongoing impact of residential schools, and how, if at all, Canada is moving toward reconciliation. Read more.
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    September 28
    Dr. Jeffrey Ansloos is addressing the structural issues that lead to suicidality in Indigenous communities
    Suicide rates are significantly higher in Indigenous communities because of systemic barriers. OISE researchers Dr. Jeffrey Ansloos and Shanna Peltier say Canada must decolonize its approach to suicide prevention and shift the objective from not only reducing deaths to enhancing the quality of life among Indigenous populations. Read more about Ansloos and Peltier's research and how they aim to improve suicide prevention policies and practices. Read more.
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    September 27
    What factors shape COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy in minority communities? OISE alum Dr. Notisha Massaquoi explores in new study
    A new U of T research project led by OISE alum Notisha Massaquoi and colleague Peter A. Newman is looking to understand the factors that shape COVID-19 vaccine hesitancy among racialized sexual and gender minority communities - with an aim to build trust in the healthcare system. The study's results will not only inform ongoing COVID-19 vaccination campaigns but also improve planning for future public health emergencies. Read more.
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    September 27
    To lead, you first have to learn: Henderson and Cairine Scott's gift for OISE students
    Henderson (Glenn) Scott, who graduated with three degrees from OISE between 1958 and 1965, and his wife Cairine have generously created a bequest to augment their OISE scholarship, the George Flower Award for Advanced Studies in Education. Learn more about their exceptional passion and commitment to our Institute's mission and its students. Read more.
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    September 21
    Indigenous graduates shared stories of self-discovery at First Nations House ceremony
    This past summer, with drums, song and air hugs, the University of Toronto's First Nations House -- founded by OISE alum Kahontakwas Diane Longboat (BEd '76, MEd '78) -- celebrated Indigenous students who either graduated in June or who completed another important milestone in their academic careers. Look back at the highlights, as students and their families cheer for the Class of 2021. Read more.
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    September 17
    OISE alumna Dr. Karen Edge tackles the question for school leaders and teachers: What would make this easy?
    How can we convince ourselves and others to improve our teaching, will it take a revolution or something more practical, and what happens if we imagine "what would make this easy"? In this podcast, OISE alumna Dr Karen Edge, a Reader in Educational Leadership at University College London, talks about school leadership and school improvement strategies. She is known for her ability to blend theory and evidence-based strategy with practical insights and humour. Watch here.
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    September 17
    OISE student tackles big issues of racism, diversity in online classrooms
    Learn how one Saskatoon teacher is tackling issues of racism and diversity in their online classroom. Meral Choudhry, who recently began her studies at OISE, wants to teach her young students to have "love for all, hatred for none," and is doing so by making issues like racism, multiculturalism and residential schools accessible to them in a unique curriculum. Read more.
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    September 16
    OISE's Perry King discusses his new book Rebound: Sports, Community, and the Inclusive City on CBC Radio
    Hear from OISE's own Perry King on CBC Radio as he discusses his new book, Rebound: Sports, Community, and the Inclusive City. In this closely reported exploration of the role of community sports in diverse urban centres, King, a Toronto journalist, offers a compelling roadmap for re-imagining neighbourhoods whose residents are active, healthy, and genuinely connected. Listen here.
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    September 15
    Hello, Bonjour, Boozhoo: Welcome (And Welcome Back!)
    #UofTBacktoSchool: Welcome (and welcome back) to OISE. This year will look a lot different - but we will get through it together as a community. In this video, our alumni offer advice on making the most out of your time here! Watch here.
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    September 13
    Social media, disability studies and blended learning: Here are four unique courses on offer this year
    The 2021-2022 school year begins and the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education is here to provide a large slate of course offerings for the community. To wade you into this year's course offerings, here is a list of four distinct and interesting courses (one from each of OISE's four main departments) that still have some availability. Read more.
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    September 08
    'Here we are, now it's our turn': OISE alum Ceta Ramkhalawansingh reflects on 50 years of women's studies at U of T and beyond
    The story behind one of the oldest women's studies programs in Canada begins with the tale of two courses launched 50 years ago. OISE alum Ceta Ramkhalawansingh, then an undergrad in U of T's Faculty of Arts & Science, played an instrumental role in a collective that started "Women in the Twentieth Century," one of the first interdisciplinary history courses at the University. The course and its advocates would help ignite women's studies not just in North America but around the world. Read more.
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    September 08
    Bon élève! How French teacher Chrystal Smith created a community math program for kids
    When Chrystal Smith (MT '19) realized her community at the Boys and Girls Club needed help in math, she created an online school for them. Now she's completing an additional MA in her new favourite subject. As a skilled French teacher, Smith always had an interest in language. She often goes the extra mile to make her classes high-energy and fun-filled. But the 2020 pandemic led her on a different path - to STEM education. Read more in U of T Alumni News.
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    September 07
    PhD candidate Christine Alden gives 3 policy considerations for integrating the outdoors into Canada's early learning and child-care programs
    Research shows that outdoor early learning has significant developmental benefits for children. As early years educators reimagine learning and care post-COVID, governments need to contemplate a Canada-wide system that embraces outdoor learning, writes PhD candidate Christine Alden in The Conversation. Read more.
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    September 02
    Summer's over but COVID-19 is not. OISE experts discuss how Ontario should approach a new school year
    What should be Ontario's priority as schools reopen next week? Five education experts including OISE prof. Carol Campbell and researcher Beyhan Farhadi share their policy priorities for elementary and secondary schools. Read more.
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    September 02
    OISE alum Notisha Massaquoi, a renowned expert in health equity, joins U of T Scarborough
    Notisha Massaquoi, a 2020 OISE PhD graduate, has spent more than 30 years advocating for greater access to primary health care in Black communities across Canada. Now, she is joining the University of Toronto Scarborough's department of health and society as an assistant professor - and will teach a course on health equity and anti-Black racism. She recently spoke to U of T News about her research, teaching philosophy and what she's looking forward to most about being at U of T. Read more.
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    September 01
    Bon élève! Teacher Chrystal Smith's passion for language leads her to STEM class
    When Chrystal Smith (MT '19), a skilled French teacher, realized her community at the Boys and Girls Club needed help in math, she quickly completed an additional qualification to start teaching them. With the pandemic forcing students to stay home, Chrystal created an online math school, all while starting a math teaching position at the TDSB - helping her to become the STEM educator she never knew she would be. Read more.
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    August 31
    Did full-day kindergarten work? OISE's Jane Bertrand joins The Agenda to discuss
    What have politicians learned from Ontario's full-day kindergarten program when proposing their own childcare programs and is FDK a success? Watch OISE's Jane Bertrand, program director for the Margaret and Wallace McCain Family Foundation, discuss on TVO's The Agenda. Watch here.
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    August 31
    What does an anti-racist math class look like? OISE's Beverly Caswell shares her teaching strategy
    Ontario recently deleted anti-racist language from its math curriculum. But educators say that incorporating anti-racism into math education gives students context about how math has been used to perpetuate racism and how it applies to real-life scenarios that encourage equity. Ultimately, if we want children to see math as a "tool to help us understand the world," says Prof. Beverly Caswell of OISE's Robertson Program for Inquiry-based Teaching in Mathematics and Science, "[teaching] can do that by using math to understand issues of power and privilege." Read more.
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    August 31
    Why the oldest child in Syrian refugee families needs the most urgent support, and what schools can do: OISE study
    OISE researchers found that the oldest child in Syrian refugee families has the most responsibility and the lowest English knowledge compared to peers. These children face many unique barriers, like complex trauma, interrupted education, and racism. Read more to find out what schools can do to support them. Read more.
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    August 31
    'Hope and healing': OISE clinical psychology grad discusses her work with marginalized communities and a new self-help resource
    Jennifer Barbera (MA '09, PhD '13) decided to become a psychologist after working in homeless shelters and community organizations. The experience brought her to OISE for the career she always wanted, and the rewards of helping people find healing and joy continue to inspire her learning. Read more.
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    August 30
    How parents can be 'emotion coaches' as kids navigate back-to-school during COVID-19: OISE's Jennifer Jenkins
    Noticing, validating and managing emotions is an important part of family health and wellness. Professors Jennifer Jenkins and Mark Wade explain how Covid-19 stress "gets in the family" and how emotion coaching - a simple 2-step process - can help calm the emotional storm at the moment, and also teach children how to manage their own emotions in the future. Read more.
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    August 29
    Children and schools during COVID-19 and beyond: OISE's Scott Davies
    OISE's Scott Davies is one of 15 experts from the Royal Society of Canada's Children and Schools COVID-19 Working Group. The group has created a policy briefing intended to serve as a pandemic recovery resource for educators, administrators, support staff, school mental health professionals, and decision-makers in the education sector, as well as parents/guardians and the general public. It includes 10 recommendations for pandemic recovery in education. Read more.
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    August 19
    Progress for feminism in Afghanistan has remained limited: OISE's Shahrzad Mojab
    Canadians observing the Taliban's swift takeover of Afghanistan say they are skeptical of the group's claims that women's rights will be respected under Islamic law. OISE prof. Shahrzad Mojab, who specializes in threats to women's rights and education, agrees. Afghan women have managed to take advantage of four key funding programs over the last 20 years, "but the best analysis is young Afghan women are outraged by both the corrupt Western-backed government of Afghanistan, as well as fearful of a future under Taliban." Mojab adds, "there's no room for women's rights under Sharia law." Read more.
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    August 19
    OISE alum makes history as first Black president elected to a teacher union in Ontario
    OISE alumna Karen Brown, a Toronto teacher, is the first Black president elected to a provincial teacher affiliate union in the province - and quite possibly the country. As president of the Elementary Teachers' Federation, Brown says she will "lead with the passion and resolve necessary to ensure ETFO members are protected and supported." Read more.
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    August 19
    Alum Samantha Peters shares her initiative to support Black 2SLGBTQI+ women, combat workplace racism
    A recent study has revealed that 80 percent of Black Canadians feel racism has negatively impacted them at work. OISE alum and lawyer Samantha Peters discusses her Black Femme Legal toolkit which provides legal and educational resources and support to Black 2SLGBTQI+ women experiencing discrimination and racism in the workplace. Watch on Breakfast TV Toronto.
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    August 19
    Profs. Leesa Wheelahan and Gavin Moodie dismantle arguments for higher ed's latest craze: micro-credentials
    Microcredentials don't stack up, warn professors Leesa Wheelahan and Gavin Moodie. In a new paper, the researchers dismantle arguments for higher education's latest 'craze', arguing that micro-degrees are "gig credentials for the gig economy." Read more.
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    August 18
    Young and Navigating COVID-19: A Story of Resilience by the OISE Youth Research Lab
    In this digital story, a team of youth researchers working with OISE's department of curriculum, teaching and learning narrate their participatory research project about how a group of Latinx and Indigenous youth in Tkaronto (Toronto) navigated the COVID-19 pandemic. Watch here.
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    August 17
    Canadian election 2021: Will the national child-care plan survive? OISE's Kerry McCuaig discusses
    OISE Fellow in Early Childhood Policy Kerry McCuaig examines the fate of Canada's national child-care plan now that an election has been called. She points out the importance of affordable child care in staving off the "she-cession" brought on by the pandemic. Read more.
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    August 17
    Dr. Xi Becky Chen co-authors new paper on the impact of COVID-19 on language and literacy in Canada
    One of the most significant achievements of a baby's life is the emerging ability to understand and use language to communicate. In OISE prof. and co-author Xi Becky Chen's new paper, the team explores how the COVID-19 pandemic has impacted important aspects of language and literacy development, including multilingualism, language use during COVID-19, achieving literacy and more, with recommendations for parents, teachers, educators and policymakers. Read more.
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    August 13
    'What an incredible opportunity': OISE doctoral student takes virtual journey to Hiroshima to explore issues of peace education
    Even though she could not be in Hiroshima, Japan in person, PhD student Myuri Komaragiri had an immersive, deeply engaging experience as part of a lauded international peace education symposium, PELSTE 2021, of which OISE is an international collaborator. Komaragiri's background is in education and international development - specifically, at the nexus of education and conflict. "So, I've always been looking at issues of forced migration and how conflict impacts education," she says. PELSTE was the perfect place to deepen her knowledge in the field. Read more.
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    August 11
    550,000 Canadian Grade 1 students to receive OISE alum Nadia L. Hohn's picture book Malaika's Costume
    OISE alum Nadia L. Hohn's award-winning picture book Malaika's Costome will be delivered to every Grade 1 student in Canada this fall. An enchanting prose writer, Hohn blends English and Caribbean patois. The national book giveaway will provide 550,000 copies of Hohn's book to kids, an honour the former Grade 1 teacher says she is thrilled to receive. Read more about Hohn's award-winning stories. Read more.
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    August 09
    U of T remembers Bill Davis, Ontario's 'education premier'
    U of T remembers William Davis, Ontario's 'education premier:' "The very ethos of OISE traces to the passion and leadership of Mr. Davis-as education minister, as premier, as friend of the institute," said OISE Dean Normand Labrie. "We hope we continue to make him proud." Read more.
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    August 09
    Statement on the passing of William G. Davis
    The Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, along with the University of Toronto, the Province of Ontario, and Canada, is feeling a deep sense of loss with the passing of Premier William Grenville Davis on Sunday, August 8th, 2021. We send our sincerest condolences to the Davis family. Premier Davis was a great friend to our community. He lent his insight and his heart as a friend to many who have worked and learned under the OISE banner. We will sorely miss his guidance and presence. Read more.
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    August 09
    OISE friend and champion of education William Waters passes away
    The Ontario Institute for Studies in Education is saddened to hear about the passing of our good friend and champion of education, William Robert Waters. Dr. Waters (BA '60, MBA '72, Hon LLD' 04), a tireless champion of education, made it his life's mission to help students overcome academic and economic barriers to education. The talented academic, visionary entrepreneur and generous philanthropist passed away on July 28, at the age of 88. Read more.
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    August 04
    Professor Paula Caplan dies: Feminist psychologist took on her profession
    Paula Caplan, an OISE professor and pioneering psychologist who exposed how her profession had pathologized a wide range of female traits and social responsibilities, including motherhood, menstruation and even shopping, died. Her work opened the door to a broader critique of her profession, specifically what she saw as an urge to pathologize everyday human emotions. Dr. Caplan argued doing so could do more harm than good by encouraging healthy people to think they were sick. Read more about her fierce feminist perspective and remarkable life in New York Times. Read more.
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    August 04
    A look at literary giant, OISE alum Dionne Brand's 2000 novel At the Full and Change of the Moon
    Award-winning poet and novelist Dionne Brand's 'At the full and change of the moon' is a novel about Marie Ursule, queen of a secret society of militant slaves in 1824 Trinidad, who is planning a revolt by mass suicide. Featured in CBC for Emancipation Day 2021, the novel features interconnected stories of the African diaspora, defiance, oppression and intergenerational trauma told through the eyes of six generations of Marie Ursule's descendants. Listen here.
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    August 04
    Canada's small businesses could be saved by converting them to co-operatives: OISE's Marcelo Vieta
    The COVID-19 crisis has demonstrated that our communities must be self-sustaining rather than reliant on volatile global value chains. Co-operatives bring resiliency self-determination to local economies, says Professor Marcelo Vieta. Read more.
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    August 03
    Book by OISE alumni explores how Canadian Black activism challenges systematic racism, "Canadian niceness" myth
    Until We Are Free, edited by Rodney Diverlus, and OISE alumni Sandy Hudson and Syrus Marcus Ware, explores issues facing the Black community in Canada. The collection of writing and photographs has been featured on CBC's list of 20 books by Black Canadian authors to read in honour of Emancipation Day 2021. Until We Are Free addresses how Canadian Black activism, alliances with Indigenous groups and savvy social media use have served to challenge systemic racism, state violence and question myths of "Canadian politeness and niceness." Listen here.
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    August 03
    Prof. Rinaldo Walcott featured in CBC's Black Canadian authors to read for Emancipation Day 2021
    In On Property, author and OISE professor Rinaldo Walcott examines the legacy of indentured servitude and racial slavery and casts an analytical eye on the complex concept of property. Featured on CBC's list of Black Canadian authors to read in honour of Emancipation Day 2021, the pamphlet book calls for systemic changes and sets forth the argument that owning property should be abolished. Listen here.
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    July 30
    Meet OISE's newest Vanier Canada Scholars
    Meet two of OISE's 2021 Vanier Scholars, Shanna Peltier and Sandra Osazuwa. These outstanding doctoral students are working to create safer, healthier, more joyful Black, Indigenous and marginalized communities through research and advocacy. In this Q&A, learn more about their achievements and plans for making an impact. Read more.
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    July 30
    When kids lie, how should you handle it, when should you worry: OISE's Dr. Kang Lee
    Although dishonesty is understandably worrisome, scientists like OISE's Dr. Kang Lee emphasize that lying is a necessary part of normal development. In his research on 7- to 12-year-olds, Lee found that lying disturbs the connections between different regions of the brain. However, as kids age, their brains become better at handling cognitive tasks and this disruption decreases. Kids with poor executive function will have a harder time telling a good lie. Read more in the Washington Post.
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    July 29
    OISE alumnus Gary Pieters appointed to Ontario Human Rights Commission
    OISE alum Gary Pieters has been appointed to the Ontario Human Rights Commission for his commitment to community building, youth engagement, diversity, and social inclusion. Pieters brings over two decades of leadership roles in equity initiatives in the education sector. Read more.
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    July 28
    OISE alumna is one of six Canadian educators to receive prestigious National Geographic fellowship
    As one of six Canadian educators chosen to be a Grosvenor Teacher Fellow with the National Geographic Society and Lindblad Expeditions, OISE alum Sarah Gallah was selected to expedition to the Arctic. But, the coronavirus pandemic postponed that trip. Read more.
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    July 27
    Tokyo-bound athlete is balancing his teaching career with Olympic medal ambitions
    Crispin Duenas got his acceptance letter to OISE just as he was walking into the opening ceremonies of the 2012 Summer Olympics. "It was a really fun day that became better, because now I had a little bit of a path for my future to take," says Duenas, an OISE alumni who will compete in his fourth Games. Since graduating, Duenas has been working as a supply teacher and long-term occasional teacher in math and physics, with the Toronto District School Board. It has stayed that way as he continued to compete nationally and internationally in his sport. Read more.
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    July 16
    Professor Carol Campbell wins public education advocacy award
    During its annual general meeting on July 15, the Canadian Teachers' Federation (CTF/FCE) celebrated the accomplishments Dr. Carol Campbell with their Public Education Advocacy Award. This award recognizes dedicated, long-standing service, as well as major contributions to publicly funded education. Read more.
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    July 15
    Teacher, actor, wine-lover, friend: Professor Emeritus John Gilbert in memoriam
    The late Professor Emeritus John Gilbert's scholarly knowledge of theatre was intimately tied to his life on stage, the many and diverse roles he played and, importantly, the generosity characteristic of actors who uphold the words and worlds of playwrights. To a room of students, his teaching proposed that the imagined world of theatre had everything to do with the real one we were inhabiting. OISE's Dr. Kathleen Gallagher reflects on the life of her remarkable colleague and friend, John. Read more.
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    July 15
    As Dalla Lana's Indigenous health lead, OISE alum Angela Mashford-Pringle wants to create a safe and welcoming space
    As the first Indigenous health lead at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health at the University of Toronto, OISE alum Angela Mashford-Pringle says her goals are simple: "I want to create a safe and welcoming environment for Indigenous students, faculty, Elders and Knowledge Keepers and their guests." Read more.
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    July 14
    A tribute to Professor Alison Prentice: Vital OISE community member and influential feminist scholar
    Professor Alison Prentice will be remembered as a path-breaking feminist historian, a prolific researcher, writer and editor, an outstanding teacher, generous mentor and dear friend to many. Throughout Alison's impressive career, her interests in the history of education were closely linked to her focus on women and gender relations. Thus, she was the founding head of OISE's Centre for Women's Studies in Education. As her student, colleague and friend Elizabeth Smyth wrote: "Always humble, caring and thoughtful, Alison paired a brilliant mind with a compassionate personality. She was a legend. She was a star." Read more.
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    July 14
    Remembering Professor Margrit Eichler: OISE friend, mentor, scholar, activist and an adventurer
    Many in the community will remember Professor Margrit Eichler, who sadly passed away on July 8, 2021, for her tremendous influence at OISE and beyond. Interim Dean Normand Labrie remembers the frequent interactions they had in the hallways of OISE, in meetings or at OISE Council at a time when her activism, energy, and scholarship were as always, so present. A Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada, Margrit was a professor emeritus in OISE's Department of Social Justice Education and over the years served in a number of important roles across the University of Toronto. Read more about Margrit's path-breaking career, her scholarship and remarkable character. Read more.
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    July 13
    How can we use digital technology to address inequalities in higher education? Prof. Charles Pascal weighs in
    How can universities use their position to confront challenges posed by the digital revolution? In this episode of the Internationalist, OISE prof. Charles Pascal discusses the digital divide and creating equal access to higher education with digital technology. Listen here.
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    July 12
    Indigenous communities drive Connaught-funded research projects at U of T, OISE
    How can traditional knowledge be harnessed to help Indigenous people heal from the trauma of residential schools? This is one of the key questions being explored by the Land Education Design Project, a collaboration between Indigenous-led organizations and prof. Eve Tuck. Read more.
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    July 09
    Holding the Tokyo Olympics without spectators during COVID-19 emergency puts the IOC's 'supreme authority' on full display: OISE's Helen Jefferson Lenskyj
    With concerns that the Tokyo Olympics could become a super-spreader event, why then are the Games taking places? The answer lies in the power that the International Olympic Committee - the self-proclaimed "supreme authority" for world sport - holds over the cities and countries that host the Games, writes OISE prof. Helen Jefferson Lenskyj. Read more.
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    July 09
    Native children didn't 'lose' their lives at residential schools. Their lives were stolen: OISE's Erica Violet Lee
    Canada's term 'residential school' is deeply inadequate. These were not schools; they were prisons and forced labour camps, writes OISE alum Erica Violet Lee, a nêhiyaw poet and scholar. As unmarked graves of Indigenous students are uncovered across Canada, the outcome of this long-awaited reckoning involves "multiple Native nations across the land delving into their own soils, pursuing the stories we've all heard from our elders and knowledge-keepers," and building another world, writes Lee. Read more.
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    July 07
    OISE researcher explains how therapeutic writing can empower us without revisiting trauma
    Writing about trauma can make us upset but also help us heal. OISE researcher Elizabeth Bolton Cartsonas explains how writing can guide a chaotic mind in ways that do not involve revisiting trauma. In the Conversation, she shares three evidence-based tips for therapeutic writing. Read more.
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    July 06
    'Not just part of the past': OISE's Jennifer Brant on teaching the subject of residential schools in Canada
    Professor Jennifer Brant says one reason for many Canadians' seeming inability to fully understand the horrific legacy of residential schools is the way the subject has traditionally been taught in school - if it has been taught at all. "Residential schools are referred to as a 'process of assimilation,' when, in reality, they intended to 'kill the Indian in the child.' This wasn't just an assimilation project - this was a project of genocide." Read more.
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    July 02
    Teachers need ongoing anti-Black racism training, not Band-Aid solutions says Prof. Ann Lopez
    Rather than simply being a topic of a one-off workshop, explored only in an elective course or "something that you do if you want to," it's important for anti-Black racism to be highlighted amid wider conversations and discourse around racism and become "endemic and embedded" into everything educators are learning, says OISE prof. Ann Lopez. "Racism is systemic. Injustices are systemic. So you cannot change something that's systemic and structural with Band-Aids - and that's what we've been doing," she said. Read more.
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    June 30
    Shanna Peltier on convocation and having an unapologetic Indigenous lens
    #OISEGrad21: Shanna Peltier, who graduates with her master's today, has brought a collaborative approach to her research on mental health, wellness and life promotion among Indigenous communities. Learn about Shanna's journey-and her unapologetically Indigenous lens. Read more.
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    June 23
    Embodying adaptability: Athena Tassis on graduating, education technology, and the next steps in her teaching journey
    #OISEGrad21: Athena Tassis' work in OISE's Master of Teaching Program didn't just make her an adept educator who can expertly deploy ed tech in her classroom. It's made her a changemaker who is ready for the next chapter of her teaching journey. Read more.
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    June 21
    OISE alumna, YouTuber gives fun LGBTQ+ lessons for kids and teachers this Pride Month
    OISE alumna and educational YouTubers Brittany Cohen and Shawn Matts celebrate Pride Month in a new video for children, parents and teachers. It includes a short lesson about Pride and what it means to be part of the LGBTQ+ community, as well as a fun art activity. Watch here.
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    June 16
    COVID-19 school closures accelerate education inequities in Ontario: OISE's Lance McCready
    COVID-19 school closures accelerate education inequities in Ontario, finds new study by Prof. Lance McCready and colleagues. Barriers such as not having access to high-speed internet or computers and devices to follow along at school means that some students have simply stopped learning altogether. And, the loss of access to school-based health care services as well as the social benefits of routine and structure have all impacted students' mental and physical health. Read more.
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    June 16
    Three universities, one purpose: International scholars come together to discuss Black boys in education
    "Let us pray." As the virtual conference on Black boys in education began with prayer, it ended with takeaway points of action that scholars could take to their communities. The webinar, titled "Black Boys Education: Currency, Practices and Social Interventions," brought together scholars from OISE, the University of the Commonwealth Caribbean (UCC), Mico University College, as well as scholars from Kenya. Jamaica's Minister of Education, Youth and Information, Fayval Williams, was also in attendance. OISE Professor Njoki Wane also addressed the attendants. Read more.
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    June 14
    Prof. Jennifer Brant weighs in as calls mount for Ontario to bring in more residential school, Indigenous education curriculum
    "One course is not enough, especially when we consider the instructional time required to establish assurances for avoiding the harm of superficial reconciliation and safeguarding against cultural appropriation." Currently, Ontario teachers complete a 12-session course and are then expected to teach students about Indigenous histories in their own classrooms. This is ineffective, says Professor Jennifer Brant. Read more.
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    June 01
    Dr. Eve Tuck awarded Emily Carr University's 2021 honorary doctorate
    Despite the impressive list of honours and achievements under OISE professor Eve Tuck's belt, the first words she uses to describe being awarded Emily Carr University's 2021 honorary doctorate are "surprised" and "humbled." As a writer, teacher and researcher, her work centres Indigenous social thought and the ways it can be create more fair and just social policy, practice and approaches to decolonization. Read more about Dr. Tuck's scholarship and what this recognition means to her. Read more.
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    June 01
    'This recognition is richly deserved': Meet OISE's 2021 Leaders and Legends Awards recipients
    Meet OISE's 2021 Leaders and Legends Awards recipients. This year's winners - all OISE alumni - are making a difference in the social, economic, political and cultural wellbeing of individuals and communities in Canada and worldwide. Read more.
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    May 31
    A statement from OISE Dean Glen Jones
    The Ontario Institute for Studies in Education is appalled and devastated to learn of the discovery of human remains from 215 Indigenous children at the Kamloops Indian Residential School. We share in the anger and grief felt by our Indigenous faculty, students, staff and alumni, and pledge to lend our care and support to all of our community members as we navigate the trauma and loss from this grim discovery. Please read the full statement. Read more.
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    May 30
    Prof. Njoki Wane discusses reading, writing and her new memoir From My Mother's Back
    "Write something where you don't care how people judge you or how people rate what you're writing about because that's your story. That's your reality." OISE prof. Njoki Wane sits down with Room Magazine to discuss her new memoir, From My Mother's Back. Read more.
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    May 28
    Laminated notions of equity and diversity: Dr. Ann Lopez
    OISE's Dr. Ann Lopez joins Stephen Hurley at voicEd Radio to discuss what degree our notions of equity and diversity are "uncritical and laminated." In this conversation, Lopez shares about her early life and what influenced her work as a young student, educator, administrator and now, a scholar in the area of equity, decolonization and antiracist education. Listen here.
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    May 27
    PhD candidate Lucy El-Sherif writes about the high cost of advocating for Palestine
    PhD candidate Lucy El-Sherif writes about the high cost of advocating for Palestine. Drawing from her research which examines when Muslim Canadians challenge Canada's social order, El-Sherif discusses issues of racial profiling and censorship as she asks the question, when will Canadians stop punishing those who call for justice for Palestine? Read more.
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    May 26
    OISE launches the Institute for Student Mental Health and Wellbeing Initiative
    As a world leader in transforming lives through teaching, education research and evidence-based advocacy, the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education believes that the most promising pathway to mental-health system reform starts with education - reinventing the way our schools and educators prevent, identify, support and alleviate child, youth and young adult mental health concerns. Powered by philanthropy, we will begin our Mental Health and Well-Being Initiative by recruiting a globally-respected expert in youth mental health and then attracting key partners across the education, health and social service sectors to help jumpstart research and demonstration projects aimed at exploring innovative new practices and approaches. Read more.
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    May 25
    Sports and physical education: Meet OISE Professor Heather Sykes
    Include the excluded and marginalized-this is the guiding principle behind Professor Heather Sykes' innovative research. Learn how Dr. Sykes is bringing together anti-colonial, queer and feminist theories to inquire into sports and physical education. Read more.