Advisory Board

The Advisory Board of CMCE provides non-binding strategic advice and guidance in managing and steering the Center and planning its activities. Members of the board assist CMCE with governance, fulfilling our mission, help publicize our activates, lend professional, personal and institutional support in grant applications, and connect us to stakeholders and community members.  The commitment for board members is one monthly meeting at OISE for 1.5 hours in person, via skype or phone to discuss budget items, plan activities, network and create events that engage OISE students, faculty, teachers and local artists and activists in collaborations, and presentations, that promote arts and media literacy education in Toronto, in Ontario and beyond. Members of the board are invited to serve for one calendar year, however, they could choose to leave at any time. Board Members:

Miglena S. Todorova is the director the Centre of Media and Culture in Education

Todorova is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Social Justice Education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), University of Toronto. She is also the Director of the Centre for Media and Culture in Education at OISE. Todorova received her PhD in American Studies in 2006 at the University of Minnesota, United States. Her research and teaching are in the areas of media/cultural studies, transnational feminisms, globalization and education. Todorova is an international scholar with extensive experience in designing curriculum and pedagogies that support feminist and gender-based analysis and advance equality and social justice. Since 2003, she has taught courses on critical media literacy education, social relations in cultural production, globalization, and qualitative methods of research and analysis in Canada, Bulgaria, and the United States. Prof. Todorova is an experienced radio producer and the author of international youth media literacy projects dedicated to critical understanding of gender, race and sexuality. She is also an awarded teacher who seeks relational pedagogies that connect struggles and enable change.

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Catherine Lamaison
Lamaison completed her Ph.D in Social Justice Education at OISE, University of Toronto and her M.A. in American Studies at Université Paris Diderot in Paris, France. She is currently a Lecturer in the Department of French at the University of Toronto. Her research interests lie in the area of francophone cultural studies, ranging from transnational approaches to cultural production and identity formation, to social protests through popular culture in the African and Caribbean diasporas, to the question of translation and interpretation of fundamental francophone texts which sometimes lead to completely new theorizations in North American literature. She now serves as a member of the advisory boardToileDesArts, a national hub and network of 300+ organizations working in those fields, from 2014 to 2017.

Elizabeth Charles is an adult educator and PhD student in the department of Social Justice Education, she uses critical pedagogies to explore how Canadian popular culture reflects and perpetuates the dominance of white, able-bodied, masculinity. Her interest lies in the dominant social culture’s impact on the lived experiences of female racialized bodies in Toronto.  In her classroom, students explore how popular discourses of diversity, multiculturalism, inclusivity and tolerance found in the Canadian workplace protect the dominant social culture while alienating and marginalizing those who are “othered” in Toronto.  The radio program that she recently produced featured critical reflections about my life-long experiences with diversity in Toronto.

Eve Haque is an Associate Professor in the Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics at York University. She has also served on the board of the Association of Canadian Studies (ACS) and is currently on the Advisory board for the Canadian Association of Cultural Studies (CACS) and the journal Topia. Her research and teaching interests include multiculturalism, migration and language policy, with a focus on the regulation and media representation of racialized im/migrants in white settler societies. She has published in such journals as Social Identities, Journal of Multilingual and Multicultural Development, as well as Pedagogy, Culture and Society, among others. She is also the author of Multiculturalism within a bilingual framework: Language, race and belonging in Canada (University of Toronto Press, 2012)

Henrjeta Mece is an interdisciplinary scholar, artist, curator and educator. Working towards her Ph.D. in Social Justice Education and Diaspora and Transnational Studies, Mece’s current research focuses at the intersection of art, culture, transnationalism and higher education. Along her academic and professional career, for the past seven years she has been living a transnational life. During this time, she has regularly held talks, presentations, exhibitions, and has been a guest at world-class residencies at institutions including, International Studio and Curatorial Program New York (USA), the Banff Center for the Arts (Canada), Tirana Institute for Contemporary Art (Albania), Akureyri Studios (Iceland), Zweigstelle Berlin (Germany), and University of Lisbon (Portugal).

Maral Karimi is pursuing a PhD in Social Justice Education at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education. Maral graduated with a Masters degree in Interdisciplinary Studies at York University. Her master’s research on the impact of the discourse of the leaders of the Iranian Green Movement of 2009 is scheduled to publish in a forthcoming book in Winter 2018. Her study applies critical discourse analysis to the communications of the actors involved in the movement through the lens of YouTube to facilitate an understanding of the underlying causes and the origins of the movement. The study maps social movements in Iran since the beginning of the 20th century particularly focusing on the rhetoric of Ayatollah Khomeini in order to historicize the Green Movement and its aspirations. Maral also serves on the organizing committee for the Women and Gender Studies Association at Congress 2018 in Regina, Saskatchewan.

Mark Houghton is a Ph.D. Candidate in OISE’s Department of Social Justice Education at the University of Toronto with a specialization in workplace learning and social change through the collaborative program of the same name. His main areas of interest are Philosophy of Education, Rhetorical Theory, Subculture Studies, and how emotion affects young human beings in precarious forms of work, labour and identity. Mark looks to the technical side of the performing arts world, a world he has both trained and worked within for over twelve years, as a unit of analysis and microcosm for the study of precarity. Mark is particularly interested in the rising area of information-labor, a cultural work milieu no longer attached to the ideological Fordist models of twentieth century.

Raz Rotem is currently pursuing a Masters of Education in the Social Justice Education department at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education. Raz’s master’s research is focused currently on Canada Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) Call for Action on Language and Culture. Raz is interested in the implications of the TRC recommendations on formal and informal Art and Media Education programs. Raz has a Bachelors of Fine Arts from the Ontario College of Art and Design (OCAD University) Sculpture and Installation department, and is a graduate of Humber College Child and Youth Care program.

Rubén A. Gaztambide-Fernández is a professor at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education of the University of Toronto. His research and scholarship are concerned with questions of symbolic boundaries and the dynamics of cultural production and processes of identification in educational contexts. He draws on cultural studies, postcolonial and feminist theory, and critical sociology to inform his understanding of curriculum and pedagogy as encounters with difference. His current research focuses on the experiences of students attending specialized arts program in public high schools in cities across Canada and the United States. He is also Principal Investigator of the Youth Research Lab and the Youth Solidarities Across Boundaries, a participatory action research project with Latino/a immigrants and Indigenous youth in the city of Toronto.

Hayley Brooks is pursuing an M.Ed in the Social Justice Education program at the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE). After finishing her B.A.H. at the University of Guelph in International Development Studies with a focus on Gender and Development, Hayley worked for five years as an Executive within a high-paced retail environment. During this time, her experiences heightened her interests in the convergence of media and culture, feminism and critical media literacy. In her M.Ed and with aspirations for further doctoral research, she hopes to explore these areas and their contributions to media literacy scholarship, particularly within the context of the Ontario public school system.