Faculty

Professor, Head of CERLL

Research focus:
French as a second and foreign language, the impact of the Common European Framework of Reference on language teaching and assessment, complexity theories and creativity, plurilingualism, and cognitive and emotional aspects of language acquisition

Associate Professor
Associate Chair, Student Experience, Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning
Program Coordinator, Language and Literacies Education Program

Dr. Gagné is also involved in research with immigrant teachers and learners along with colleagues in a number of immigrant-receiving countries including Scotland, England, Iceland, Norway, Sweden, Finland, and Australia. She has also been a member of the Advisory Board for Teach in Ontario, a bridging program for internationally educated teachers in Ontario.


Associate Professor

 Associate Professor in Language and Literacies Education in the Department of Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning.

Her research and teaching focus on language and power in conversational and intercultural institutional settings, particularly workplace ESL, and on second/additional language learning and the professional development of second/additional language educators.


Associate Professor

Program Coordinator, Language and Literacies Education Program

website: https://wordpress.oise.utoronto.ca/lpp2017/

His research includes three broad areas.: how language policies and language policy advocates construe the value of language education,  education policy reforms in Germany and their impact on racialized students there, and  language teacher education.

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Assistant Professor

Cassie J. Brownell is an Assistant Professor of Curriculum, Teaching, and Learning in the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto. Framed by her experiences as an early childhood educator in post-Katrina New Orleans and her role as an international research partner for the MakEY Project, Dr. Brownell uses qualitative modes of inquiry to critically consider how education might become more inclusive of children’s cultural and modal ways of knowing. In taking an interdisciplinary approach to her work, Dr. Brownell bridges scholarship from literacy and social studies education alongside critical childhood studies to examine children’s sociopolitical development and civic participation.

Dr. Brownell’s research has been funded by the National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation, the International Literacy Association, the National Council of Teachers of Education, and Canada’s Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council. Additionally, her scholarship has been recognized with awards from the American Educational Research Association’s Writing & Literacies SIG and the Language and Social Processes SIG. Samples of her research can be found in the pages of the Journal of Curriculum and PedagogyCurriculum InquiryThe Reading Teacher, and Language Arts.

Originally from Montana, Dr. Brownell earned a B.A. in Social Welfare and Justice Studies from Marquette University before she obtained a Master of Elementary Education (K-6) from the University of Notre Dame. She received her doctorate in Curriculum, Instruction, and Teacher Education from Michigan State University in 2018.

Assistant Professor

Her research expertise is in the areas of sociolinguistics, discourse analysis, French as a first and second language, French immersion, and second language education. Her current research examines the development of sociolinguistic competence by first and second language speakers of French in the Canadian context.

Professor
Program Coordinator, Language and Literacies Education Program

Her research interests focus on: supporting and assessing young children’s multimodal communication in play environments; action research; rural education; feedback on writing; writing assessment and instruction; and children’s literature.


Professor

Dr. Troper’s main interests focus on immigrant, ethnic and minority group history; intergroup relations; North American Jewish studies; history of film; American history; history of education and schooling.


Professor

Dr. Levine’s research interests include history of education with special reference to social modernization and economic change, the history of schooling in relation to demographic analysis and family history, the history of literacy, the social history of education in relation to popular culture, educational history in England, historiography of the history of education.

Assistant Professor 

Her main research interests focus on linguistic representation among language learners and on inclusion of linguistic and cultural diversity in teaching practice in primary and secondary school.

Professor
Associate Dean, Programs, OISE

Professor Normand Labrie has been appointed as Associate Dean, Programs, for a three-year term beginning July 1, 2019.

A professor at OISE since 1991, Professor Labrie has a long and successful history of leadership at our Institute. Highlights of his service include terms spent as Acting Associate Dean, Programs, as Associate Dean, Research, as Associate Dean, Research and Graduate Studies, and as Centre Head of the Centre for Franco-Ontarian Studies (CREFO). 

Alongside this wealth of administrative experience, Professor Labrie is a productive, internationally influential scholar with teaching and research programs in the areas of bilingualism and multilingualism, linguistic politics, linguistic minorities, language contact, and discourse analysis. 

 

Assistant Professor

Her keen interest in migration policy has led her to conduct research studies on issues related to multilingual education, particularly on the education of newly arrived migrant pupils in Europe (TRAM project, Taalschool project, EDINA) and indigenous pupils in Suriname (Meertaligheid in Suriname in collaboration with the Rutu Foundation). In 2015, her research report (Le Pichon-Vorstman & Baauw, 2015) was at the center of a debate on migrant issues and education in the Dutch parliament. In the last years, Dr. Le Pichon- Vorstman has served on boards of the Dutch Association of Applied Linguistics (2012-2017), of the Ethical committee of the Utrecht Institute of Linguistics (2016-2017) and of the Education Commission for undergraduate (2015-2016) and graduate students (2016-2017) of the Department of Languages, Literature and Communication in Utrecht.

 Associate professor

Academic Director of the Centre for Urban Schooling at OISE

Drawing on insights from practitioner research, critical literacy, and New Literacy Studies, Dr. Simon’s scholarship explores how educators develop understandings, curriculum, and pedagogy from students’ diverse cultures, languages, and literacy practices. The aim is to re-imagine schools and classrooms as places oriented to increased equity and educational opportunity for all students.

In 2015, Dr. Simon received the Early Researcher Award from the Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation for a project called “Addressing Injustices: Teachers and Adolescents Coauthoring Social Justice-Oriented Literacy Curriculum”. He is the principal investigator of The Minecraft Project, a recently completed SSHRC-funded study of youths’ perspectives on the educational affordances of the online game Minecraft for urban classrooms.